Going to SC. - Graybeard Outdoors
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-16-2017, 09:26 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southeast MO.
Posts: 453
Send a message via Yahoo to justonemorear
Default Going to SC.

Looking in the area south of the Spartanburg area for a possible home. Tired of the MO. winters.
Any odd gun laws I should know about? Here we can do pretty much anything, I do have a CCW.
Checked several sites but they seem to conflict.
Thanks for any input.

When it absolutely needs to be there, reload

Pareo Nullus (Obey None)
justonemorear is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-16-2017, 07:34 PM
Senior Member
 
bugeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Morrow Ga.
Posts: 12,628
Default

You "cannot" carry your handgun in SC unless you're a resident.

democrats are in favor of the wholesale slaughter of God's most precious; unborn babies.
bugeye is offline  
post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-16-2017, 07:37 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,583
Default

Don't rule out NC. A great state as well.

If you hunt in the southeastern part of South Carolina, one word: rattlesnakes! Including 6 foot canebrake rattlers.

Mannyrock
mannyrock is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-17-2017, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southeast MO.
Posts: 453
Send a message via Yahoo to justonemorear
Default

Thanks of the response.
I will look into NC

When it absolutely needs to be there, reload

Pareo Nullus (Obey None)
justonemorear is offline  
post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-17-2017, 10:55 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,583
Default

NC is a really great state. Although it is has lots of rural land, mountains and forests, it also has extremely high tech research and medical facilities. These are primarily located in the Research Triangle, which is a geographic triangle created by Duke University, NC State, and North Carolina University. It also has the wonderful beaches and fishing at the Outer Banks on the Atlantic. In terms of education, jobs and housing, it is way way above South Carolina.

NC can get very hot and humid in the summer, but it doesn't compare with the tropical heat and humidity of South Carolina, or the palmetto swamps of South Carolina. South Carolina has beautiful Myrtle Beach, but other than that, I can't see any reason to live in South Carolina over North Carolina. The cost of living may be slightly lower in SC than NC in most areas, but not all.

SC does have some very large retirement communities, centered around golf, but that is only a plus if you like living in small tract housing and want to play golf every day with a bunch of old frts, and put up with the incredible heat and humidity.

Plus, NC has alot of different cities, spread throughout the state, which are all different and have a different feel to them. Greensboro, High Point, Raleigh, Charlotte, the list goes on and on. NC also has two world class Universities, Duke is consistently ranked in top three and NC University is consistently ranked in the top 20 by U.S. News and World Report.


SC has, . . . .er, Clemson. (Also known as Tiger High.)

SC does have a really high whitetail population, and probably the longest deer hunting season in the U.S. Approximately 8 weeks. But, the deer there are small! I spent a week there, near Dillon SC, back in the mid-80s. and although one nice sized buck was brought in, all of the rest of the bucks were about the size of Great Danes.

And then there was the cane-break rattler, shot below a guys tree-stand. Measured ten feet. A giant. As thick a fire hose. The guy who shot it actually hung it up and spent two hours skinning it. (The last skin I would ever want.) After that, I was afraid to leave my deer stand and walk through the waist high palmetto plants. (You couldn't see the ground you were walking on.)


Mannyrock
mannyrock is offline  
post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-18-2017, 08:13 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southeast MO.
Posts: 453
Send a message via Yahoo to justonemorear
Default

thanks mannyrock
i'm coming out that way in the next couple weeks
looking for rural like here in semo, i'm 30+mins from any large shopping areas but 5 mins if milk or eggs are needed
looking for a place w/ a little land like i have 10< acres, maybe have a cow or 2
has to have close fishing and hunting ground but not too near others
i don't want sidewalks or neighbors in a stones throw, born and grew up in the ny tristate area until my mid 20's
deer here are not very large but larger than those described, racks are horrible unless you get corn fed.
local hill deer lack a mineral, same reason we don't have pheasant

When it absolutely needs to be there, reload

Pareo Nullus (Obey None)
justonemorear is offline  
post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-18-2017, 11:28 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,583
Default

My suggestion would be to look at the western third of the state, as close up against the Appalachian mountains as possible. Also look up where the border of NC comes up close to the border of Virginia, in the western part.

Ashville is gorgeous, but is a huge retirement city, so it has gotten too expensive.

Stay away from the Lenoir and Hickory areas (both cities). Extremely destroyed by the big recession, and have never recovered.

There is certainly a lot of farmland in the eastern part of the state, but it is flat tobacco and bean land. Not what you want.

By the way, I would highly recommend that you look at the town of Bristol, Virginia/Tennessee. It is on Interstate 81. Half the town sits in Virginia, the other half in Tennessee. The land thirty miles north and south of the town, along the interstate (and particularly on the west side of the interstate) are still rural. Beautiful mountains.

Tennessee has no state income tax. But has a very high sales tax. The area south of Bristol is called the Tri-Cities area, because there are three small cities within about 60 miles of each other, that form a triangle.

Tennessee is without question the most gun friendly state in the U.S. I lived there for 30 years. I use to joke and say that the difference between a conservative and a liberal in Tennessee is that the conservative already has his handgun when he applies for his carry permit, and the liberal waits until he gets his permit in the mail before he buys his handgun. And, it goes without saying that they both have a rifle or shotgun in the back of their closet, even if they have never fired them.

All in all, I think Tennessee would be the best bet for you. Cheapest cost of living and lowest real estate taxes. The most rural land. One problem is that you would be really far from a good beach. If you stay on the eastern side of the Appalachians, in western Virginia or NC, then you would be within 4 hours of Virginia beach and probably the Outer Banks.

You would have no problems whatsoever in finding 10 to 20 acres, in a rural setting, in any of the three areas I have discussed. Great deer hunting in all three states, but with Tennessee and Virginia having the biggest deer. Tennessee would have the longest seasons.

By the way, all three of these areas are primarily Republican, and all three have minimal racial tensions and issues. Of the three states, NC, particularly the Charlotte area, would have the greatest race problems. But, Charlotte sits right on the border of NC, and really feels like it is part of SC instead of NC.

When it comes to fresh water fishing, you've got me there. I know nothing. All three states have trout fishing on their major rivers, but I am sure that they are put there by the state, on a catch and release basis. None of the states has anything to compare to the trout fishing in Northeast Arkansas, like the White River. As far as bass and bluegill, they are probably all about the same.

If you are going to drive out here to take a look, then you can route your trip so that you go east to Nashville, and then pick up I-40 East. It will take you straight over to Interstate 81. You can then go north on I-81, up through the Tri-Cities area of Tennessee, and straight into Bristol.

You can then stay on I-81 in Virginia for about 60 miles, and then pick up Interstate 77 going south, right down into the western half of NC, on the eastern side of the Appalachians.

By using this route, you can look at all three areas I have mentioned.

One thing to get ready for, all of these areas have more people in them, and feel more crowded, than Missouri. They have been inhabited by settlers for a 100 years longer than Missouri, and consequently the land has been cut and recut into smaller parcels for a 100 years longer than Missouri. An 80 acre farm in any of these areas would be considered very large. Forty acre parcels that have not been been turned into fenced cow pastures are hard to come by, unless you have a working corn, bean or tobacco farm.

Hope this helps.

Mannyrock
mannyrock is offline  
post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-18-2017, 11:31 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 3,583
Default

P.S. My wife grew up in NJ. I laugh because up there, they call any 5 acre parcel a "farm."

Its worse in southern Connecticut. Up there, any 3 acre parcel with a house on it is called a "farm," and they even name it and put a fancy sign up in their front yard.

What a joke!

Mannyrock
mannyrock is offline  
post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-23-2017, 08:58 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Southeast MO.
Posts: 453
Send a message via Yahoo to justonemorear
Default

thanks, just got back from Bama, going out that way in a couple weeks

When it absolutely needs to be there, reload

Pareo Nullus (Obey None)
justonemorear is offline  
post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 03-24-2017, 11:01 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Frisco, NC
Posts: 3,247
Default

I live on the NC Outer Banks. Way out on the Outer Banks. You sure can't drive from the foothills of NC mountains to here in 4 hours. Takes that long from Raleigh. Nothing in Virginia Beach but herds of people. They come down here for recreation.


NC is a long state east to west. Over 500 miles in width. Not much tobacco left. Only grown by large producers under contract with tobacco companies. No quota any more. Seen a lot of farming changes in my life.


My NC state income rate last year was a fraction over 5%. To my knowledge we have only one toll road, no toll bridges, and only two ferry routes that have tolls. Those rides are about 3 1/2 hours each to and from the mainland to Ocracoke Island.


Be happy to share any info you wish about NC. Been here 70 years. I live at one end and my son lives in Asheville on the other end.
charles p is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Graybeard Outdoors forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome