Author Topic: stone cannon ball  (Read 2036 times)

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Offline dobber1919a4

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stone cannon ball
« on: December 09, 2011, 03:04:29 pm »
a friend of mine just called me and said he has found a stone cannon ball that is about 2.75". He is wanting to know what cannon or mortar it might have been fired out of. any ideas?


Offline GGaskill

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2011, 03:39:38 pm »
If he found it in North America, it is probably something else as I doubt there were many small bore stone throwers used here.

What was the general area he found it in? 
GG
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Offline The Jeff

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2011, 04:40:22 pm »
What was the general area he found it in?


Downrange from the Mythbuster's abandoned runway.  ;D

Offline Cat Whisperer

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2011, 05:36:22 pm »
Dobber -

WELCOME to the forum!

I agree - just because it's a sphere doesn't mean it's a cannon ball.

BUT when you have the addiction EVERYTHING you look at is seriously considered for it's properties as a projectile.

What do you like to shoot?
Tim K                 www.GBOCANNONS.COM
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Offline rampa room artillery

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2011, 08:20:49 pm »
i know of at least one that has been found here in va along the water officially dated 1500's  theory is that they were used as ballast in ships coming to the colonys.  i have held the ball in my hand and seen the paperwork from the smithsonion. so yes depend on where it was found. and conditions found 

Offline Cat Whisperer

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2011, 04:51:34 am »
Good point Rick - you've rasied the issue of AGE as well as FUNCTION.

How would one establish either?

Comparison to known others is a start.
Tim K                 www.GBOCANNONS.COM
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Offline Artilleryman

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2011, 06:40:02 am »
I believe that the Spanish had at least one stone mortar in Florida.  I can't imagine why they would go to the trouble of making round stones for it.
Norm Gibson, 1st SC Vol., ACWSA

Offline Max Caliber

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2011, 08:16:05 am »
May be a kidney stone from an Apatosaurus.  ;D
Max

Offline IvarForkbeard

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2011, 02:18:02 pm »
I believe that the Spanish had at least one stone mortar in Florida.  I can't imagine why they would go to the trouble of making round stones for it.

Because labor was cheap and iron expensive.
Former US Navy, living in West Michigan

Offline phsarge

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2011, 02:37:47 pm »
I know my neighbor has some of what they call out here as " Missouri River cannonballs". They are perfectly round like a cannon ball and can be found along the Missouri river. Not sure how the are made but they are pretty heavy. Will have to see if I can get over to his place and take a picture.
PHsarge

Offline Artilleryman

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2011, 07:37:08 pm »
I believe that the Spanish had at least one stone mortar in Florida.  I can't imagine why they would go to the trouble of making round stones for it.

Because labor was cheap and iron expensive.

I figured that someone would go out and collect the size stone needed and not worry too much about the shape.
Norm Gibson, 1st SC Vol., ACWSA

Offline PaulB

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2011, 10:04:21 pm »
I have one that was supposedly picked up outside Tutbury castle in England. Tutbury castle was in use from the 12th century until it fell during the second siege on it during the English civil war in the 17th century. Is it real? Who knows but I like to think it is.
The ball is just under 2" which would have made it shot for a Falconette.
Paul

Offline YOB 1942

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2011, 03:58:44 pm »
To this very day you can see stone cannon balls embedded into the outer wall of Fortress Coburg. They are well more then 2 inchers
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Offline shred

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2011, 06:55:02 am »
To this very day you can see stone cannon balls embedded into the outer wall of Fortress Coburg. They are well more then 2 inchers
The stone cannon balls stuck in the walls at Rhodes are likewise much larger-- 20+ inches.  They date from the bombard era, so presumably cannon technology plays a part.

Offline Cannoneer

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Re: stone cannon ball
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2011, 05:15:05 am »
I believe that the Spanish had at least one stone mortar in Florida.  I can't imagine why they would go to the trouble of making round stones for it.

Because labor was cheap and iron expensive.

I figured that someone would go out and collect the size stone needed and not worry too much about the shape.


Large bore stone mortars fired a natural version of grape shot in a high arc. These stones would have been used as found, and they were probably around the size of a fist. The stones were placed in a woven basket, and the basket lowered down the bore. The U.S. even had a couple made; one bronze 16-inch M1839 stone mortar survives at West Point.
If the 2.75-inch stone ball is indeed carved stone shot, then in all probability it was made to be fired from a 'cannon'.
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