Author Topic: Plum Tree  (Read 760 times)

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Offline CannonKrazy

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Plum Tree
« on: May 29, 2011, 08:22:48 pm »
I planted a plum tree 3 years ago. I don't remember the variety but I remember it said it was self pollinating. It is over six feet tall and hasn't bloomed once.
Do plum trees have a dormant period before producing? Or do I have a bad tree that needs to be cut down and replaced?


Offline Graybeard

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2011, 09:48:50 pm »
Six feet isn't a very tall tree. By three years most of those that spring up around my oldest are more like 10' to 12' tall. Some times they just don't have fruit. This year mine was loaded with blooms but I don't see any fruit at all.

I've had little bushes not much over 2' tall with blooms. Not knowing what ya have I guess you'll just have to wait and see.


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Offline CannonKrazy

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2011, 07:19:50 am »
The tree is a Santa Rosa. I bought 2 trees and planted one at my daughters house. Her tree had a few blooms on it last year but no fruit. Both trees are strong and healthy.  I plan on cutting down 3 old apple trees this fall that are in bad shape. I was looking at the plum tree trying to decide what to do with it. Maybe waiting another year will prove to be fruitful. Thank GB.

Offline blind ear

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2011, 11:12:31 am »
If you see a plum tree that bears fruit that you like, You can usually just cut off several small limb ends and stick them in the ground where you would like to have a tree and have good success in getting them to root. Just soak the ground and stick more limb in the ground than is above the soil line. ear
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Offline LunaticFringeInc

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2011, 12:25:59 am »
Mine isnt a Santa Rosa, and while I cant remember the name off hand it too is self polinating suposedly.  But it too is about 8ft high and two years old and it hasnt had a bloom one yet either.  Its a very healthy looking tree though.  I was just chalking it up to being too immature to produce yet.

Offline Rex in OTZ

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2011, 12:08:43 pm »
My relative had one by her garage that for the most part never produced, I do remember it produceing a couple times, there was allot of family speculation about the almost non existant productivity of the tree, could be its placement, mabe the grafted branch thats to pollinate the female blossoms died or is streile?
This is definately a question for Gurneys or Burpees seed companies
http://gurneys.com/default.asp?eid=081506&sid=506238&gclid=CJ3R4r2llakCFYRa7AodgzyHfQ

http://www.burpee.com/

Offline CannonKrazy

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2011, 08:44:46 pm »
There was an old tree in the exact same place I planted the new tree.The old tree died from damage after a wind storm. It was a Santa Rosa also.
I talked to a couple friends that have trees that were planted about the same time and they have mixed results. Some produced fruit the first year and some hasn't produced at all. Maybe it's just a maturity issue.

Offline ratdog

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2011, 01:59:29 am »
i planted a santa rosa plum last year ive got a lot plums of it since i had to pick alot of it off early because it was sagging bad i like them and so do the birds here in utah.

Offline reliquary

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2011, 01:57:47 pm »
I have a three-year-old Santa Rosa that's about 12' tall, 8" in diameter, and has produced fruit the last two years.  I fertilize my trees quite heavily and irrigate.  It actually bloomed its first spring, but I don't let them fruit the first year; that's for putting down roots.

Sometimes a tree just isn't healthy, or may not be in the right spot.  If you planted that where an old tree was, without digging out the roots, they may be interfering.  I had an Ozark Premier that I just cut down that was about 6 years old, never got more than head high, and had probably a dozen fruit its best year.  Never did figure out its problem.  Now it is helping flavor smoked meat and is doing okay at that.

Plums like at least a foot of soil over clay, so that there's drainage.  Most fruit trees don't like to have standing water around their roots.  Try another SR in a different place?  Dig up the rootball and move that one?

I've kept a small orchard, about a dozen trees, mixed varieties of plums, peaches, and apples, for about 25 years.  They don't last forever, even with regular spraying and maintenance.  I plant new ones every 2-3 years, so that when an old one dies, a replacement is at hand...they're good to have but can be really frustrating.

Offline CannonKrazy

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2011, 09:28:11 pm »
When I cut the other tree down the stump and big roots were dug up and removed. Before planting the new tree I dug the hole out big enough to add 2 large bags of potting soil. After reading here and talking to other folks I think it's more of a maturity issue than bad tree.

Thanks guys for all the info.

Offline reliquary

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2011, 06:50:48 am »
CannonKrazy-

One last thing about your tree...this fall, put some Jobe's fertilizer spikes (or equivalent brand) in the ground under the dripline of your tree.  That may "shock" it into some growth & production. 

I mix garden fertilize (12-12-12) with cottonseed meal or compost (keeps it from burning any root it comes in contact with) and punch holes in the ground as deep as a heavy steel crowbar will reach, under the dripline of the tree, about every 2' apart. I put the fertilize mix in these holes...nutrients go to the roots rather than grass.  Gives great results for me.  Do this in the fall during dormant season.

During growing season, I scatter the fertilize on the ground under the trees as soon as they start leafing out, and mulch them with leaves and grass clippings as I mow & clean up.

Blessings.

Offline CannonKrazy

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Re: Plum Tree
« Reply #11 on: June 05, 2011, 08:42:32 pm »
Thanks for the tips.