Author Topic: Silhouettes, creedmore position and hunting......  (Read 983 times)

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Offline BLACK BEAR

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Silhouettes, creedmore position and hunting......
« on: May 04, 2004, 07:30:49 am »
:-) Clyde

A few years ago I wrote a tale for the IHMSA News titled "Creedmore in the Cactus". I discribed my qwest for dinner on the high plains of Wyoming. I managed to fill my antelope doe tag from a true creedmore position using my UAS Rampro in 6BR.

My contention is the "on your back" posistion is a viable tool in hunting the rolling grass land country of North Eastern Wyoming. In the years after that first creedmore kill I have downed a number of antelope and mule deer using "Unlimited " class weapons while laying on my back. The position is rock steady and the long eye relief scopes work best when they are the proper distance from the eye.

Yes, I have also used my backpack, sagebrush and other objects to steady the pistol, one must be ready to addapt to the hunting situation in a hurry. Even managed to pop a couple bucks standing up like a man but I prefer laying down on the job.

Bill


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Re: Silhouettes, creedmore position and hunting......
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2004, 09:27:59 am »
Hi Bill

You will have to admit that Creedmoor is virtually worthless when hunting with a Revolver and though it can work in special circumstances in most situations the barrel is too close to the ground in creedmoor to clear the debris that interfers with sighting.  It is as you said rock steady, as good a prone with a rifle and a sling, but even rifle shooters rarely shot prone in the field with a few notable exception such as rolling hills with little or no vegetation to get in the way.  Sitting or kneeling is generally much more practicable.  

While we are talking hunting how many folks actually hunt small game with a high rise mounted 24x scope standing like our PAS FP entry?  I can't usally find a small game animal in a scope of that magnification off hand with a rifle standing  :wink:   The vast majority of handgun hunters that use scopes have them in from 2X-4X with a small amount going all the way up to 6x or 7x.   Of the Big Game handgun hunters here in Alaska the majority are using 7.5" FA's and Redhawks/Blackhawks chambered in Big stuff.  A few are using bolt guns in .308 or larger.  I would bet you a beer that less than 1 in 50 guns used for silhouette ever make it to the hunting fields.  Not that they couldn't but for the most part silhouetters shoot steel with their handguns and game with rifles with a few exceptions.  Many don't hunt period.  The need to get ready in a hurry means no blast shield in the field.  Which leads nicely to a good question do you use a blast shield when shooting U, UAS?  Do you use a blast shield when hunting?  te="BLACK BEAR"]:-) Clyde

A few years ago I wrote a tale for the IHMSA News titled "Creedmore in the Cactus". I discribed my qwest for dinner on the high plains of Wyoming. I managed to fill my antelope doe tag from a true creedmore position using my UAS Rampro in 6BR.

My contention is the "on your back" posistion is a viable tool in hunting the rolling grass land country of North Eastern Wyoming. In the years after that first creedmore kill I have downed a number of antelope and mule deer using "Unlimited " class weapons while laying on my back. The position is rock steady and the long eye relief scopes work best when they are the proper distance from the eye.

Yes, I have also used my backpack, sagebrush and other objects to steady the pistol, one must be ready to addapt to the hunting situation in a hurry. Even managed to pop a couple bucks standing up like a man but I prefer laying down on the job.

Bill[/quote]

Offline BLACK BEAR

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Antelope and silhouette pistols cont..
« Reply #2 on: May 04, 2004, 11:35:43 am »
It will be another couple months before we know about our Wyo. permits. We are trying to draw an area a little closer to home.

To add a bit of a chalenge this year Roger suggested on the first day or so of the hunt we draw names to see what gun, rifle or pistol we hunt with. It will not be our own gun but one of our hunting buddies.

If we draw an iron sighted weapon a spotter will be manditory, you sure don't want to waste an ether sex tag on a doe and damn well better not shoot a young buck on a doe, fawn tag.

I must be one of the nuts that likes to hunt with my latest UAS or US pistol. Hunting with a high mounted US pistol is like using a rifle with no butt stock. A bit tricky but it will work, at least on antelopoe. Took a thick horned fellow two years ago with my 6.5BR and the Leupold turned up to 20X. Bill Jr has bagged a nice buck with his 357 FA, says that white stripe makes a great aiming point. May be I will draw the FA this season. Many times we have used the spot and stock method so if I had the iron sighted FA I am sure I could pack along the blast shield, either to put on top of a rock to protect the gun or slip it over my knee to protect me.

Bill

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Re: Antelope and silhouette pistols cont..
« Reply #3 on: May 05, 2004, 09:33:47 am »
Hunting with a gun you are not familiar with or giving someone a pistol to hunt with if they are not a good pistol shot is not being respectful of the animal you are hunting.  If anyone takes a shot and isn't 100% certain when they break the shot that it will be a clean kill they shouldn't be taking the shot.  Hitting a steel Pig or Ram in the butt is a lot different than hitting a game animal in the butt.   Maybe you fellows shoot each others equipment and know it well in which case I guess the game is ok, if not you need to re think this one.  

Anyone who hunts should absolutely know his limits with the equipment he is using.  This is a sore subject with me as I know too many hunters that can't hit a paper plate at any distance without a bench to rest the gun on.  Get em off the sight in bench and they should limit their shots to about as far as they can throw a good size rock.   We just had a guide mauled because his client couldn't hit a Brown Bear well at under 100 yards with 3 shots and the wounded bear ran ito the thick cover as they most often do!   Sorry folks but if you can't drop in with shot #1 don't take shot #1.  
Quote from: BLACK BEAR
It will be another couple months before we know about our Wyo. permits. We are trying to draw an area a little closer to home.

To add a bit of a chalenge this year Roger suggested on the first day or so of the hunt we draw names to see what gun, rifle or pistol we hunt with. It will not be our own gun but one of our hunting buddies.

If we draw an iron sighted weapon a spotter will be manditory, you sure don't want to waste an ether sex tag on a doe and damn well better not shoot a young buck on a doe, fawn tag.

I must be one of the nuts that likes to hunt with my latest UAS or US pistol. Hunting with a high mounted US pistol is like using a rifle with no butt stock. A bit tricky but it will work, at least on antelopoe. Took a thick horned fellow two years ago with my 6.5BR and the Leupold turned up to 20X. Bill Jr has bagged a nice buck with his 357 FA, says that white stripe makes a great aiming point. May be I will draw the FA this season. Many times we have used the spot and stock method so if I had the iron sighted FA I am sure I could pack along the blast shield, either to put on top of a rock to protect the gun or slip it over my knee to protect me.

Bill