Author Topic: Stevens SxS 1915 patent  (Read 1199 times)

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Offline Kragman71

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Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« on: February 17, 2008, 02:13:15 am »
Hello
I have a shotgun marked:
"J.Stevens Arms Co.Chicopee Falls Mass. U.S.A."
"PatentedApr 20,1915"
"HighPressure Compressed Steel" "Barrel and Lug Forged in One Piece"
I can find no serial#.
Iwoud like to know the Model and the date of manufacture.
Also,is it a boxlock,or what?
Thanks,
Frank
Frank


Offline Rangr44

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2008, 02:13:46 pm »
[Also,is it a boxlock,or what?]

That's a little like saying: "I have a gun - can anyone tell me what it is, when it was made, etc ?"

It's just waaaaay too little information.

Pics are best, along with physical specifics, like - does it have external hammers ? Does the action have side lock plates ?  Are there any markings on the barrel undersides, between the hinge & forearm stud ? Are there any markings inside the action ? What  GAUGE is it ?

Generally, although not always, if the rear of the action metal is squared-off, where it meets the buttstock ears - it's usually a boxlock action.  Floorplate actions look the same from the outside, but Stevens didn't make any of those.
Sidelock shotguns have side plates for the locks - ala L.C. Smith's & higher-grade European shotguns.

AFAIK, L.C.Smith was the only US sidelock maker - which should make your Stevens a boxlock.

1915 is when Stevens advertized that they are now making their own shotgun barrels, with the lug integrally forged - instead of buying barrels from Belgium, as did most others - since World War I was looming, and the barrel supply was disappearing as countries fell to aggression.
At that time, Stevens was one of the largest, if not the largest firearms manufacturer in the world- so they were able to do things that other companies couldn't/wouldn't.

Stevens would have marked the barrels with that statement for a very long time - but I don't know if/when they stopped marking them such.
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Offline Kragman71

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2008, 04:37:15 pm »
Ranger 44
Thanks a bunch,for the advice.
There IS a serial# number inside;on the barrel and on the receiver bottom."H5013"
Also a tiny "G" on the receiver.
The gun is a 12 gauge SxS.
There is also a flying goose on the side of the receiver with the "STEVENS"markin
Frank
Frank

Offline Rangr44

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2008, 08:51:40 am »
"G" is the Savage date code for 1955.

AFAIK, The "H" prefix means it's a heavy - i.e., for heavy loads - a waterfowl gun, and probably has full choked long barrels (unless shortened by someone).
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Offline Kragman71

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2008, 12:57:10 pm »
I rechecked;it is a small "G".However,It was used by my Uncle,with Me,in 1946.He probably bought it in the 1930's.
The "H" is for heavy.It is heavy,with long barrels.
I have exhausted my search for a book with a schemetic of this gun.I located the NRA Firearms assembly #5-Shotguns.It is not in there.
I just put 40 miles on the car to get a pair of  12 gauge snap caps,to no avail.
I need to uncock the gun to check the recocking feature .How bad would it be to do it with an empty chamber?
Frank
Frank

Offline Rangr44

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 04:48:50 pm »
[He probably bought it in the 1930's.]

FYI - The 1929 Savage Price List shows Model 330 & 335 Stevens Double hammerless shotguns.
The 1939 Price List only Stevens double listed is the Model 530/530T.
These were made at the same time as the Model 311, listed in both Price Lists - but I don't know if they are renditions of the older Stevens double or a 311 clone.


If it was mine, I wouldn't take the chance of breaking a lock part, by snapping on an empty chamber.

If you don't have any 12ga fired shells, I would cut two live shells in half just forward of the brass, throw away the shot charge & powder & snap on the primed,shortened case - which you can later punch out the primer & fill the primer recess with pencil eraser to make your own snapcaps.
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Offline Kragman71

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2008, 05:11:13 pm »
Good idea,Ranger
I was considering that;now,i'll do it.
FYI I have an "E" on the front of the trigger guard on my Model'99 R. That is year 1953
Letters inside the gun have a different meaning.whatever it may be.
I've been busy.I have information on 47 Savage/Stevens/Springfield shotguns.
Nothing on mine.
Thanks for your help
Frank
Frank

Offline Kragman71

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2008, 02:03:29 pm »
Thanks,Ranger
I am also seeking help on a different website.
A knowledgeble  Fellow there,opined that I have a Model 315,which is father to the Model 311.
He also states that many Savage SxS were based on it,also;even the Savage Fox model.However the Model 315 is not mentioned in the catalog.
Can you give me a clue as to the advisability of removing the buttstock.The gun is working just fine,after all the work that it had done.
Frank
Frank

Offline Rangr44

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Re: Stevens SxS 1915 patent
« Reply #8 on: February 22, 2008, 07:13:26 am »
I've only had buttstocks off M-99's, M-24's, M-219's & M-311's - the 311 being about twenty years ago.
IIRC, they were all through-bolted, under the buttplates - maybe needing a little penetrating oil on the threads to start it turning (especially w/Tenite), and a soft bump on the stock comb to nudge it rearward.
On some, I've loosened the through-bolt only a few turns with a long-shanked screwdriver, then tapped on the screwdriver while clamping the butt wood, to start driving the action forward, out of the inletting.
There's a Place for All God's Creatures - Right Next to the Potatoes & Gravy ! !