Can an electric car be charged in twenty minutes? - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #1 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
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Default Can an electric car be charged in twenty minutes?

With companies like gm saying that they are going 100% electric for cars, what does that mean to the consumer? I for one don't want to be like an iPhone user, always looking for a place to plug in. Is it even possible physically to charge a car fully in about the time it takes to get a tank of gas? And what about batteries? The Tesla model s battery weighs over 1300 pounds. Where is the material for those batteries going to come from?

I don't see much effort in building car charging infrastructure, but there are few places in the country where gas stations are more than about twenty miles apart.

I saw a much advocated Chevy bolt yesterday. It's about the size of a Nissan Leaf. Too small to be practical as an all around car.

Something seems unrealistic when car companies say they're going 100% electric, but most independent auto experts see the future of cars being dependent on gasoline for a long time.
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post #2 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 09:07 AM
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At this point in time electric cars are just a pipe dream. I'll concede if you lived in a large metropolitan area and your only use for a vehicle was driving about the city then I can see their usefulness.

But for the vast majority of the country they're not practical. The technology just isn't there.

The people pushing them have absolutely no idea how most Americans live. Once you get out from the metropolitan areas the distances driven for normal everyday things make an electric car impractical. And that's not even taking into account what people in rural areas tow and haul with their pickups. Anyone want to go on vacation with their travel trailer and stop every 25 miles and wait for an hour for the batteries to charge???? Shoot, where I live it's about a 44 mile round trip to get groceries, and 80 miles one way for one of my wife's doctor appointments.
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post #3 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 09:12 AM
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Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
With companies like gm saying that they are going 100% electric for cars, what does that mean to the consumer? I for one don't want to be like an iPhone user, always looking for a place to plug in. Is it even possible physically to charge a car fully in about the time it takes to get a tank of gas? And what about batteries? The Tesla model s battery weighs over 1300 pounds. Where is the material for those batteries going to come from?

I don't see much effort in building car charging infrastructure, but there are few places in the country where gas stations are more than about twenty miles apart.

I saw a much advocated Chevy bolt yesterday. It's about the size of a Nissan Leaf. Too small to be practical as an all around car.

Something seems unrealistic when car companies say they're going 100% electric, but most independent auto experts see the future of cars being dependent on gasoline for a long time.
No. No way. Absolutely not.

The technology for fast battery changing/recharging does not exist at this time. Also what about the Ecco hazardous waste of the batteries when they need to be changed for a new battery pack? Not to mention the cost.

The electric car at this point in time is a political joke on the buyer. you're better off with a small car. My 2019 Corolla gets a solid 40mpg on the road, and driving back and forth to Mission Viejo California a couple times a year I refuel in 5 minutes. From Georgetown Texas to Mission Viejo took 87 dollars of fuel. One tank of gas runs almost 400 miles, and takes a few minutes to replace, then I'm on the road again.

They have to make some kind of break through in battery technology for an electric car to be even halfway practical. And dump a huge amount of money into support like LOTS of charging stations all over.

Maybe as a second car for just around town if you don't plan on going far. But as a main vehicle, no way right now.

Don't over do it, just enough will do.
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post #4 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:20 AM
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Tesla has charging stations all over the country. Look up their map on their website. You can get fully charged in 45 minutes. The model S is a luxury car with all the bells and whistles. It now has a range of 330 miles at 70 mph before charging. Charging stations are located along the interstate highway system near hotels and restaurants. Idea is after 4-5 hours of drive, stop to eat and recharge. Makes sense. However no fast food quick pump and go. Tesla gave their plug design free to any other electric car companies. However, they will send a bill to the owner of the car, unless it is a Tesla under warranty.

Tesla is coming out with a pickup truck that has a 500 mile range and a 300,000 lb toeing capacity (on level ground). It looks to be about the size of a Toyota Tacoma.

Every car manufacturer is coming out with electric cars. It is headed that way. Plug in hybrids for sure. I've read California has lithium, but environmentalists have held up mining it. So we have to buy from South America and Asia. Oh, Tesla has a 10 year warranty on their batteries.

Here is a map of their charging stations. Use the +/- to zoom to where you live.

https://www.tesla.com/findus?v=2&bou...tion%20charger

If you have half a charge, you can top it off in about 20 minutes. Of course this means stopping every two hours to top off the charge. The idea from Tesla is you can now cross the country and not worry about charging. If you click on the location, it will tell you where it is. It also shows the Tesla maintenance dealers.

I did a cost of a Tesla model S vs a comparable lower cost Chevy Impala. It would take 8 years to pay for the Tesla with the current cost of gasoline. However, this doesn't include oil changes or other gasoline car maintenance.

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post #5 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:35 AM
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Itís very dependent on how many electrons your moving. Short answer nope not yet, probably not any time soon either.

Watched a very interesting YouTube vid on the subject. long and short of it is you need to plan your life. Guy went from coast to coast as I recall. Tesla has a charging app, for lack of a better description. You set parameters like speed, destination, routing, and your comfort level on depletion of your battery. Itíll calculate stops and times required to charge. The interesting thing to me was charging to 100% was not a big deal. You charged till you had enough to get to the next waypoint with a satisfactory safety margin. Time was from 45 minutes to 70 minutes (again all from memory). Ate a meal and read a bit it sounded like.

I think a person would use them as commuters, 2, 3 trips to work hit your home charging station overnight. Get the big SUV out for the weekend trip. The electric will be a 15mm wrench in a world used to crescent wrenches. Better at some tasks, but poor for others.


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post #6 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:37 AM Thread Starter
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How long do you think it will be before there is useful charging infrastructure, and fully electric cars that are practical? That map shows that I can hardly go anywhere i want to go. Model s is $80k. Bolt is nearly $40k after government incentives. Home fast charger is required. Is high cost and low versatility the future of personal transportation?

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post #7 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:43 AM
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So how do we generate all of this CLEAN electricity to charge all of these CLEAN lithium batteries ????? Yep still need fossil fuel to do so! And a toxic dangerous material dump site! so far no recycling of spent lithium
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post #8 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:48 AM
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Electric cars are pushed by the left because they don't want people to have the freedom of lifestyle choice. In their world they desire large huddled masses concentrated in urban environments. Much easier to control than people traveling about unsupervised!
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post #9 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 10:56 AM Thread Starter
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I don't mind the idea of electric cars. I don't care about the technology at all. I only care about the application-- does it do what I want it to? Have you seen anything from the big car companies or anyone else about the time horizon they expect to use before all electrics become mainstream?

To read GM news, you'd think they were going to be ready to do it in just a few years. But that doesn't seem realistic. I understand that developing fully reliable and durable cars based on new technology is expensive and it takes time, but I think we should be given a realistic set of expectations about when the electrics will be able to replace most of the functionality of a petroleum based car.

As I see it now, it's like one of those technologies that's always ten years in the future. In other words, it was ten years in the future ten years ago. Now that ten years have passed, it's still ten years ahead. Before you know it, 50 years are passed and little progress is made.

A couple of years ago Volvo claimed that they would be all electric in 2020. That's not going to happen. They've changed their message at least twice. Now they're saying all of their 2019 and later cars will have some electric power, with hybrids being the first.

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post #10 of 49 (permalink) Old 09-16-2019, 11:02 AM
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Originally Posted by spruce View Post
Electric cars are pushed by the left because they don't want people to have the freedom of lifestyle choice. In their world they desire large huddled masses concentrated in urban environments. Much easier to control than people traveling about unsupervised!
spruce, I don't think you're very wrong with that. Theres no doubt that if al we had was electric cars, our freedom movement would be greatly hampered.

They used to say "God, guns and guts" made American strong. Maybe they have to add, the internal combustion engine to that.

Now if they started to put small bio diesels in cars, that would be good!

Don't over do it, just enough will do.
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