Late 70s through 80s cars - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 07:03 AM Thread Starter
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Default Late 70s through 80s cars

The dark ages for cars, especially American brands. What POSs. The Mustang II, K-Cars, Corvettes with 185HP, etc. I bought a new Dodge Turbo Colt in 85. It had a Mitsubishi engine and drive train that held up fine but the rest of the car fell apart by 30K miles including ripped seats. Glad those years are a distant memory.
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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 07:54 AM
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You're absolutely right. Worst collection of junk that was ever pushed on consumers by American companies. Foreign cars were "discovered" by Americans, and the trend still continues albeit to a lesser degree.
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 09:47 AM
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I'm thinking that Toyota is real thankful for those 80's crap cars! That's about when the VW Jetta became the rage too.

Fox body Mustangs were junk. You sure don't see many of them still on the road. They made the scrap pile early! They were light and the ones with a 5.0 ran pretty good until they didn't!
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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 11:10 AM
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Detroit has not built good cars since the late 60's. New cars all look the same with different badges. Way overpriced too!
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 11:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpa&hisguns View Post
I'm thinking that Toyota is real thankful for those 80's crap cars! That's about when the VW Jetta became the rage too.

Fox body Mustangs were junk. You sure don't see many of them still on the road. They made the scrap pile early! They were light and the ones with a 5.0 ran pretty good until they didn't!
Perusing the local Craigslist netted me the following cars for sale......

1978-1993 Fox Body Mustang - 10 for sale. Average asking price $8639
1978-1993 Toyota (All car models) - 7 for sale. Average asking price $4518

Apparently the market does not agree with your analysis. I had an 83 Mustang. Wish I still had it. One of the best cars I have had.

"And the government promised me a posse, which I figure will be long on promise and short on posse." - Rooster Cogburn
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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 11:58 AM
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With the makeshift carburetor and distributor modification the factories put out during that era to meet EPA rules, horsepower and drive-ability could be an issue, particularly for foreign made cars but those problems were easily solved if you lived where modifications such as a Holley carb, aftermarket manifold and a distributor spark advance recurve could be made. Most of the highly desired Classics come from that era. Chevy and Ford trucks of the 70's and 80's tops Hagerty's list of fast rising vehicles. Blazers, Suburbans, Nova's, Chevelle's, Monte Carlo's, Mustang's, Cougar's, T'Bird's, even Pinto's and Falcon's all have strong followings. I guarantee, no one will be preserving and restoring today's cars (with possible exception being the limited addition, super high horsepower models)
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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 11:59 AM
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Honda, toyota, and volkswagen saved the US car industry. Detroit couldn't figure out how to build cars, and the foreign makes showed them the way. The light truck emissions exemption made an even bigger difference for them. It enabled americans to buy the big cars they wanted, but in the form of a mini van. Except for rapid death by rust, the pickup trucks were still good because they were allowed to use old technology and no emissions technology.

I agree that mustang 2 was one of the biggest pieces of crap ever built.
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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 12:03 PM
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As for antique cars, i prefer to judge the value of cars relative to the market and era they were built for, not for collector value. Often, collector value is based on notoriety not excellence. Edsel and mustang2 cobra come to mind.
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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 02:46 PM
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NEVER buy a 1980 Corvette... This was the coming together of bad things all at once. Chevy was trying to deal with emissions etc and decided to "smog" a 305 V8 instead of the traditional 350. It was the perfect storm of no power. I had a 1981 and it was great, they learned from the 1980 and went back to the 350. I kind of wish I still had that car... but insurance for 2 drivers over 30 was $200 month back in the late 80's-90's!!!
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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 09-20-2019, 03:51 PM
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I prefer the looks of the chiseled earlier Fox bodied Mustangs over those with the rounded look later as the roof always looks like it was tacked on.
The Pinto Stang was a bad idea but thank God Chevy did not kill the camaro or the Fox Mustang would not exist.

Bad Corvettes the 1993 , first totally computerized Corvette; my cousin has one and if it can go wrong, it will.
The seventies rwd cars can be made to handle as well and perform as well as most of those today for a fraction of the price of a new Mustang or Camaro and they are cheaper to fix.

RR
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