Winter gloves - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 02:30 PM Thread Starter
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Default Winter gloves

Those of you who are in the snow belt, what winter gloves have worked well for you?
As I wrote in the caps post, my fingers tips are my weak spot, and I need some flexible but warm gloves, that will last at least two winters.
I have had some gloves that seemed to work pretty well but usually they are falling apart after the first year and this includes true leather gloves.
I used to stitch some back together but I just want a pair that is good to 30 below but last years, not months.

RR

Last edited by Bob Riebe; 01-19-2020 at 05:00 PM.
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post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 04:18 PM
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I find gloves to be very situation specific. Keeping that in mind I get the most use out of a simple mechanics glove. But Iím working with my hands in a relatively dry environment. I can separate paperwork, tie my boot laces, use touch screen Ďputers.

For what most would consider warm gloves I like a couple of the Clam ice fishing gloves Iíve had. Suckers arenít cheap though. The traditional leather and wool lined choppers are pretty good if you can do mittens.


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post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 06:30 PM
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How long they last depends on what you're using them for. For handling/processing wood nothing beats heavy, tough leather, but even then getting through one season is problematic. If you're using them for shoveling snow or work similar to that I've found that gloves made out of cordura or a similar heavy duty fabric lasts a long time.

For warmth cordura, goretex, and insulated are the best, especially when a thin pair of polypro liner gloves are also used. Downside is they usually sell for about $35 on up for a good pair. I avoid leather if I'm looking for maximum warmth, but choose it if I want maximum durability.

Of course mittens are by far the warmest, but I can't stand to work in them - except for snowblowing where all you have to do is grasp the handles and squeeze the controls.
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post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 07:35 PM
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I've had these gloves over 20 years. Work, splitting wood, snow shoveling, you name it. These have been the best low cost insulated leather palm work gloves. I need to start breaking in a new pair just i case I loose them.

https://midwestglove.com/product-cat...lated-leather/

https://www.amazon.com/midwest-glove...midwest+gloves
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post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 09:40 PM Thread Starter
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Mid West are good, I have a pair but the fingers ripped open to a degree sewing is a waste of time.
When I rode a motorcycle, they were my riding gloves.

I probably will get another pair because I do like them; From your web site Dave, I may invest in a pair of the cold weather gloves listed; better to try and be not happy than put up with known misery.
Oddly I have put the hospital type rubber gloves on inside outer-gloves with better than expected results but your hands get sweaty. (Although with my eczema , that is a good thing to a degree.)

Now part of my problem may be, I do not have large hands, length wise, but I have wide hands, plus I want my gloves to be a snug fit, partly because I want to be able to do at least some work, starting nuts, putting hand into a tighter place, preferably without taking my gloves off.
I have had leather , semi-dress type gloves that work fairly well for this but hook them once or twice on something sharp than they rip, which is how I learned to do sewing up gloves to a fairly decent degree.
I once sewed up two fingers, to the base, on a pair of leather dress gloves and it did not look bad plus as I used fine synthetic thread it lasted till the gloves finally totally wore out.

RR
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post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 09:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Riebe View Post
Those of you who are in the snow belt, what winter gloves have worked well for you?
As I wrote in the caps post, my fingers tips are my weak spot, and I need some flexible but warm gloves, that will last at least two winters.
I have had some gloves that seemed to work pretty well but usually they are falling apart after the first year and this includes true leather gloves.
I used to stitch some back together but I just want a pair that is good to 30 below but last years, not months.
I use merino wool gloves and put chopper mitts over them if I need the protection of leather. No synthetics. No thinsulate especially. You will not find good merino wool gloves easily.

Last edited by conan the librarian; 01-19-2020 at 09:50 PM.
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post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 10:35 PM Thread Starter
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Having done a little searching, good gloves and liners, are going to cost close to fifty bucks, which I expected and those Merino wool liners look good especially if I put them inside a pair of Mid West gloves for shoveling.
Although a pair of Olson Deepak or American-made Buffalo, are worth checking into but I absolutely have to try on any pair of gloves I buy.

I have been checking on a pair of true dress gloves, but that are tough enough for more than looking good, if the shite hits the fan while on the road, and prices start right about 75 dollars but if you get the real foo-foo ones, prices starting at 130 some dollars, they need special treatments and from what I have seen , some of the best you are paying for name and country of origin, not better gloves.

The first pair of works gloves listed on Lt. Dave's first linked site looks real good as they have rough leather but you have to ask for a price quote, which is odd.
I learned some years ago, synthetic winter gloves are crap as they get slick if cold and wet, and when you throw a shove of snow, with a grip less shove, the whole sheban, snow and shovel goes flying out of your hands, so I will never get a non-leather outer glove again.

RR
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post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 11:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Riebe View Post
Having done a little searching, good gloves and liners, are going to cost close to fifty bucks, which I expected and those Merino wool liners look good especially if I put them inside a pair of Mid West gloves for shoveling.
Although a pair of Olson Deepak or American-made Buffalo, are worth checking into but I absolutely have to try on any pair of gloves I buy.

I have been checking on a pair of true dress gloves, but that are tough enough for more than looking good, if the shite hits the fan while on the road, and prices start right about 75 dollars but if you get the real foo-foo ones, prices starting at 130 some dollars, they need special treatments and from what I have seen , some of the best you are paying for name and country of origin, not better gloves.

The first pair of works gloves listed on Lt. Dave's first linked site looks real good as they have rough leather but you have to ask for a price quote, which is odd.
I learned some years ago, synthetic winter gloves are crap as they get slick if cold and wet, and when you throw a shove of snow, with a grip less shove, the whole sheban, snow and shovel goes flying out of your hands, so I will never get a non-leather outer glove again.
Bob,

I think the Midwest Glove website caters to the wholesale market. The Amazon link had a few of their gloves from retail sellers. I think I bought mine from a Walmart back in the last century when they proudly sold Made in America items. I'm going to order a new pair from Amazon.

Dave

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post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-19-2020, 11:19 PM
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I kinda like the looks of these:




All of my favorite creatures have white bottoms.
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post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 01-20-2020, 11:19 AM
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Most of the time in Alaska I wore military surplus wool glove liners. Of course I was not in the Arctic in winter. But if it was above zero thatís what I usually wore.

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