What is the "draw" factor of corn over planted food plots? - Page 2 - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #11 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-17-2018, 12:05 PM
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Wow Landowner, the deer in Tennessee and Virginia love plain rye GRASS. There must be something similar in Florida that naturally grows everywhere, so that the grass is not a magnet for your deer.

If the deer don't like salt blocks, they won't be attracted to mineral blocks either. You can check the glue-on labels on the mineral blocks. They are 99% salt.

White ladino clover is great, but I found that any extended drought (or 10 hours of direct hot sunlight per day) will kill it out. So, I found it best to plant it in long strips right next to the heavy woods line, so that it was fully shaded for at least half the day. Even then, a boon crop of it would only live for about 3 years and then had to be replanted.


Sounds like the hog issue is your biggest problem. We have virtually none in Virginia.

I guess that the only thing you can try is to plant your plots on the part of your land that is the farthest away from your boundary with the State Forest, and clear straight lanes from the edge of the State Forest across your land to get to it. That way, the deer will have to cross over your land to get it it, and believe me, they will used the cleared, bush hogged, roadways.

Planting even a 16th of an acre with high quality deer food will work, if you put metal t-stakes around it with heavy welded four-inch square, four-foot high animal wire. Run a steel cable along the very bottom part of the wire fence, wrapped around the bottom of each post and weaving in and out of the wire fence squares. Hopefully, this will keep the hogs out and the deer will just jump across the fence to get to the food.

If you do this, plus have a small water source on your land, the deer will use your land as a safety enclave to bed down in, to escape the hunters of the State Forest. Only hunt it once a week, for not more than 4 hours, from a stand, 30 to 40 yards from the food plot, and I believe you will kill deer. Only take 1 or 2, though, or you will drive them away.

Hope this helps.


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post #12 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-17-2018, 02:53 PM
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i would imagine that there are those who are hunting the
land in question when L.O. isn't there.
that's the case in every place i've ever hunted where there
wasn't someone living on the property full time.
the people in the neighborhood watch and see absentee
owners and lessee's come and go and use property as
their private playground when the rightful users are away.
i'm sure it's no different anywhere in the country than it
is here. i can't tell you at the shell casings and boot tracks
and toilet paper and cig butts that i've found on my own
property. there's really nothing to be done if you aren't there
full time, and you for sure don't want to start a feud with the locals.
(very bad idea )

The United States doesn't have a gun control problem.
We have a people control problem.

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post #13 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-18-2018, 11:04 PM
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True Ranger,

But, my family has always stopped this by being very present during the most obvious hunting days, and by co-opting a neighbor to watch the property by granting the oldest male member of the neighbor's household the exclusive right to cut fallen timber on the property, in exchange for him calling us every time someone parks or goes upon the property.

Twice, after receiving the neighbor's call, we have met a deputy sheriff at our land and had the sheriff go in a "remove" the trespasser, telling him he will be arrested the next time based on an affidavit of criminal trespass by us. We duly photograph him and his car and license plate as he is removed.

No, it isn't foolproof, but pretty darned close.

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post #14 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-19-2018, 08:19 AM
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Default Another observation.

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In the upstate and Western Piedmont of South Carolina there has been a change in law to allow the use of corn as bait for deer. Over the three season of the lawful use of corn in the upstate, I have noticed a marked DECREASE in the incidence of deer on the 318-acres of land I have hunted for 28-consecutive seasons that DOES NOT USE corn as bait. I question the Forum if there are any other similar occurrences or observations? I am a population of one in this non-scientific "statistical analysis". I am seeking other observations.
At my previous VA residence, I could immediately tell when the neighbors started baiting by the deer sightings or lack there of. I found one of the feeders, tripod mount, 55 gallon drum filled with corn. Illegal in Va. Here, I'm running a couple food plots of oats and clover. They attract deer but not like what I've seen corn do.

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post #15 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-19-2018, 01:52 PM
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Years ago, when it was legal, my brother had a big corn feeder to feed the deer.

They came every day all right, but at 9 0'clock at night. Never in daylight.

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post #16 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-19-2018, 02:36 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyrock View Post
True Ranger,

But, my family has always stopped this by being very present during the most obvious hunting days, and by co-opting a neighbor to watch the property by granting the oldest male member of the neighbor's household the exclusive right to cut fallen timber on the property, in exchange for him calling us every time someone parks or goes upon the property.

Twice, after receiving the neighbor's call, we have met a deputy sheriff at our land and had the sheriff go in a "remove" the trespasser, telling him he will be arrested the next time based on an affidavit of criminal trespass by us. We duly photograph him and his car and license plate as he is removed.

No, it isn't foolproof, but pretty darned close.

Mannyrock
that'll work if you can find someone to cooperate with you.
in my area it's as liable to be the neighbor that smiles and
shakes your hand. about the only way to stop it is to be there
yourself full time. i was mainly thinking of the days when i
used to hunt public land a lot, and the adjacent landowners
would have to run off trespassers in droves, and about 50%
of the time the adjacent land owners would have stands on
the fenceline facing into the public land, or fence gaps where
they could access the public without having to have a permit
or register at the authorized entrance and have the wardens
know that they were there. (even though they knew)
i was also thinking of my own situation that is probably some
what like the OP's. my small piece of land is surrounded by
similar sized pieces of land and several much larger parcels.
even though everyone has enough land to do a hunt on,
there are quite a few that will still trespass to hunt on another's
land. grass is greener and all that i guess. after a decade of
having my land, i've resigned to the fact that i can't really do
anything about trespassing unless i'm there all the time, and
i sure don't want to start a feud with anyone in the area.
that would suck to be fixing fence at the far back and get a
bullet in the back, or have something catch afire, and the
VFD was just a bit slow in getting there, or someone were to
scatter deer repellent over the property, or some similar mischief.
it happens, and i can sure sympathize about bad neighbors,
urban and rural.

The United States doesn't have a gun control problem.
We have a people control problem.

Honor the Texas flag;I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas,
one state under God, one and indivisible.
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post #17 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2018, 05:22 AM Thread Starter
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I used to "walk about" on the State's property, twice finding illegal tree stands there. A call to the FL Wildlife Commission (FWC), a friendly meeting on my land, a short walk to the illegal stands, and those stands became theirs. Then that land (and mine) was watched. I do not know their results but incidences of poachers on my land dropped to zero.

I do know that one morning I was sitting in my West Road stand when three armed hunters trudged by on the State's side - they didn't even know I was there. I called FWC, who were far away but would meet me within the hour. Right! They showed up in 45 minutes with three officers and two tracking dogs. I showed them where the men had "staged" to get picked up on the highway roadside. I was asked if I had heard the sound of an airboat in the early dawn, which I had. These men were dropped off from the lake, a mile away, had walked through the State property hunting illegally, and then hunkered down until their catch vehicle got there. The officers found their "lair" and afterward watched their lands for a while.

I don't go over on the State's side any more since the State hired Hog Trappers for the 4K-acres adjacent to me. I have a sixth sense of eyes on the back of my neck and I don't want to see the broadhead, all red and gooey, sticking through my chest from back to front. Know what I mean?

In retrospect, I should not say that hogs have been our "bane" while deer hunting, even though they mostly drive the deer away. Truth be told, we've had a TREMENDOUS amount of trigger time shooting hogs (500+ off my land in 28 years).

In the days of my Pop Warner Football side-line coaching, when the incidence of hogs was greatest, I used to invite Fathers and Sons and Grandfathers and Sons to revisit hunting (for some) and start hunting for others, especially to start their Sons (mine had already killed quite a few). I would put them on stands not 35 yards from feeders and ask them to kill as many as they wanted.

One Grandfather and Son watched a truly HUGE hog of an estimated weight nearing 500#'s for 45 MINUTES at the feeder and did not shoot it. Grandpa said he didn't want that much meat. I said, what about me and bragging rights for a hog of that magnitude? Nope, not on his radar, even though Grandson wanted him to shoot it.

Two times I saw that big boy swiftly crossing a shooting lane, a 245 yard shot, 12-feet wide, and that hog FILLED the crossing end-to-end for about two seconds, but it never slowed down enough for me to get my rifle up or take a shot. Never have we seen it since, so the State Trappers must have had their hands full with it.

Last edited by land_owner; 11-20-2018 at 05:25 AM.
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post #18 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2018, 06:10 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyrock View Post
I guess that the only thing you can try is to plant your plots on the part of your land that is the farthest away from your boundary with the State Forest, and clear straight lanes from the edge of the State Forest across your land to get to it. That way, the deer will have to cross over your land to get it it, and believe me, they will used the cleared, bush hogged, roadways.
There is very good food for thought in that. QDMA has suggested Hinge Cutting around the edges of a field for manipulating the deer to come and go through proscribed paths, rather than "just any opening" the deer picks. That works too, if there are a sufficiency of trees to fell. A lot of work for this old man though - either way - and you are right that wildlife will choose the path of least resistance.

When planted, it is about 3-acres in total of 19.44 acres.
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post #19 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2018, 06:22 AM Thread Starter
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Perhaps a "look around" would be "telling" too. Not a lot of "development" on the south side of the road where I am located with two sides adjacent to the State's land - a HUGE wildlife pump (ordinarily).
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post #20 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-20-2018, 11:58 AM
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Landowner,

In your case, I would not plant multiple food plots. I think I would try planting only one, small, very high quality food plot, as far away from the state land as possible.

If you don't over-hunt the plot, the deer will keep coming to that one place almost every day. Just make sure your stand is 30 yards away from it, in some open woods, so you can maybe see a third of the plot. The goal is to get them feeling really comfortable walking out into the middle of the plot to feed. Once your crop is up, and deer season opens, do not go to that plot more than twice a week, and no more than 4 hours at a time. First week of muzzleloader season can very easily get you two nice deer.

I had a few seasons when I only wanted to shoot a big buck, so I would watch from my stand as 6 or 7 does or small deer would come into the plot and eat. They would generally stay 20 minutes or so. Then, one of the large nervous ones would smell me, get jittery, and bolt away. All of the rest would follow.

Often if this happened, and I didn't react, they would wait in the edge of the woods for 30 minutes or so, watching the plot, and then go right back into the plot, about 15 minutes before sundown.

Also, I always left about 10 feet of high grass/light brush around the entire edge of a plot, instead of planting the entire plot. The deer like to stand (hide) in the grass, looking out into the plot for 10 minutes or so, before they feel safe enough to go out into the plot. And, they will naturally cut their own trails in that little bit of brush, so that there are only 2 or 3 trails into and out of the plot. The large bucks would often stay in that brush, for another 15 minutes or so, "watching" the other deer feed in the plot, until they felt safe enough to tip-toe into the plot. Small does and yearling bucks always came out first, then large older does, and then the large bucks.

Here is another thing I found: Once they have established a large trail through the grass into the plot, you can go through that trail, and step 5 feet into the plot, and put a mineral block or food block down. What happens is that the deer (big bucks) who are leary about going into the middle of the plot soon get comfortable just stepping out 5 feet to eat or lick the block. They can't resist it. I shot many bucks this way, just 5 steps from the end of their trail.

My most successful plot was very small. About 10 yards by 25 yards, but always high quality stuff like grain sorghum or Imperial Whitetail Clover. I hand fertilized it and hand "limed" it every year. One year I planted millet, and they liked chewing off the top of the grain stem of that. Maybe the hogs would leave the grassy millet alone.

The general theme is this: If the deer do not feel safe standing in the middle of the plot during sunlight, you are not going to kill a deer there. They will just wait until an hour after dark to go in and feed.

Hope this helps.

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