What is the "draw" factor of corn over planted food plots? - Page 3 - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #21 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 05:09 AM Thread Starter
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Concluding, I am planting too much plus the hogs were getting into it. I can learn and try something new. I would like to NOT have to work so hard, plant so much, or pay the cost of 3 acres for fertilizer, inoculant, and lime just to try to kill a few deer.

I have noted that a 10-foot swath at the edge of the field, a thick swath, gave the deer great confidence and emboldened them to come out into the field. However, I had to drive ACROSS THE STATE to find a supplier with sorghum. It wasn't found locally at all nor could our local suppliers come up with a distributor that had any. Earlier planning may be in order and temporary storage of seed, lime and fertilizer a requirement. Certainly these are more "doable" in much smaller quantities.

I have noted that when the fields and strips are germinating, that doe tend to permeate the property, until they eat ALL of the food source. Where the does are the bucks follow. The doe tend to check back from time to time also to see if new shoots have germinated.

Planting with iron and clay peas or soy beans is a one off. If they have ready access to that they eat it to the dirt line, which kills it. The clover was sparsely nipped. They were OK with the WGF sorghum, and "standard" sorghum that makes for a very hardy edge swath. I never saw the deer eating the sorghum. They really LIKED the rye GRAIN but it was expensive and scarce. What wheat I had germinate was nipped. New foods were nipped but not "attacked" readily.

I put an 8' wide chain link Tee Pee in one year. That did OK. The deer could eat the mature shoots through the fence but not kill them. They also had the rest of the acreage, so it wasn't really a "strip test" through that fencing material.

I will still probably bush hog the full 3 acres of strips and fields to keep down the advance of "roughage", trees, and forest regeration, but plant more sparsely, more high quality, and more protected.

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post #22 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 03:09 PM
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With grain sorghum, I found that the deer did not really go for it until the middle of winter, when most other food sources were depleted. Then, they would go up to the stalk and eat the grain head right off of it.

An added feature of grain sorghum was that it attracted turkeys very well.

Planting a full crop of beans or peas is tough. When the deer discover it, they will go in and eat it to the dirt in just 3 or 4 days. Then, there is really nothing left.

Clover is hard to grow, but it loves to be "mowed." The deer would eat the top half off of it, and then it would grow right back. But, it does take a full year to grow a good stand of it. If you plant it in the early fall, it will not really grow in thick until the following spring. Then, the following fall it will really take off.

You are right, that planting good food plots is expensive. I use to spend about $500 on it all told every year. I started out by planting three every year, but learned later on that one really good one is all that you really need.

All I ever used for planting was a 4 foot tiller on the back of a small tractor. I tilled the ground 3 times, to get it to a powder, then hand spread the seed, then lightly ran over it again real fast with the tiller to toss 2 inches of dirt on top of it. After that, I would raise the tiller with my lift and spend 45 minutes just driving back and forth over the plot to compress the soil Everything always seemed to grow well when planted like that.
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post #23 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 06:14 PM
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My method for getting the deer to come to our corn feeder regularly is to feed them regularly. I start a month or more before gun season to get them in the habit of visiting the feeder. I have acorns, walnuts and hickory nuts from the trees on the ground all around the feeder so they are eating very little corn right now. One 50 # bag of corn lasts about 2 weeks. 2 does and 3 fawns are regulars every morning and night with one buck lurking around as we are in the rut. Sometimes get a few more bucks but mostly does. Not a herd but enough to keep my family entertained. After winter sets in there will be a dozen deer every night. Lots of coons and possum too.

All of my favorite creatures have white bottoms.
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post #24 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-21-2018, 09:14 PM
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In the upstate and Western Piedmont of South Carolina there has been a change in law to allow the use of corn as bait for deer. Over the three season of the lawful use of corn in the upstate, I have noticed a marked DECREASE in the incidence of deer on the 318-acres of land I have hunted for 28-consecutive seasons that DOES NOT USE corn as bait. I question the Forum if there are any other similar occurrences or observations? I am a population of one in this non-scientific "statistical analysis". I am seeking other observations.

May be they are "hunting" with the Apple Flavored Corn from Walmart.


That would have to be a proud day for pappa to have a father son hunting moment over a real trophy laying in a pile of Apple Flavored Corn. Just think of the REAL HUNTING stories they can share over the years about sitting in their plastic outhouse blind over a gas heater, learning all about hunting and staring out at the corn pile.

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post #25 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 07:00 AM Thread Starter
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I hear you Jack Ryan. Good sportsmanship, Fair Chase, and ethics are a real part of the hunting experience that is robbed by luring them into a pile of corn - unless perhaps it is for purposes of eradication. After all, there are different types of hunting along with different expectations - though I get where you are coming from and eradication is not the wholesale use of piles of corn.

What then is the morality of hunting the deer over intentionally planted high quality (supplemental) food plots in places where nothing of that nature exists?
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post #26 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-22-2018, 09:15 AM
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I can't say it's logical, but I've always felt the same way about hunting over a pile or corn, or even a corn feeder. You feed them every day, they come every day. You've turned a great game animal into just another type of livestock on you place. I feel like I am just slaughtering, not hunting.
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post #27 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 01:16 AM
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I hear you Jack Ryan. Good sportsmanship, Fair Chase, and ethics are a real part of the hunting experience that is robbed by luring them into a pile of corn - unless perhaps it is for purposes of eradication. After all, there are different types of hunting along with different expectations - though I get where you are coming from and eradication is not the wholesale use of piles of corn.

What then is the morality of hunting the deer over intentionally planted high quality (supplemental) food plots in places where nothing of that nature exists?

People know the difference. It is a ridiculous comparison and people who try to make it know it is.


Any more about the very first thing people will do any more as soon as they have anything on the ground they are proud of, take a picture.


Show me one of those "Look at what I killed" pictures with anything nice in the picture and it is take with the corn pile there in the fore ground with the deer, hunter, shotgun or the rest and right there front and center is their corn pile.


Then I'll entertain the possibility that even in this day of idiot Walmart shoppers there may be someone who really doesn't know for himself the difference. Then they move their kill to keep the corn, the fence, their spot light out of the picture, they know darn well they are a liar and a cheat.

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post #28 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 01:09 PM
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Well, . . .hmm, . . . interesting discussion.

With food plots, you are tilling the soil, planting, and putting the entire thing at the risk of nature. Sometimes, there is too much rain, and nothing comes up. Sometimes, there is too little rain, and nothing comes up. Sometimes, the whole thing comes up, and grasshoppers wipe it out. Sometimes, it comes up great, and for some reason we don't understand, the deer will never come to it. Sometimes, it comes up great, and the deer or other animals totally wipe it out 5 days before rifle season.

Now, lets compare that to the average "corn feeder." You walk out into the field, drop a piece of 4ft x 4ft exterior grade plywood on the ground, tear open a 40 pound bag of corn, and dump it out on the plywood. Repeat every 5 days, from October 1 through the end of the season.

To me, that is a big difference.
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post #29 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-24-2018, 02:33 PM
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actually, in some places i've hunted in far south and in west Texas, if it weren't
for the hunters putting out a feeder, there wouldn't be much of any deer over
small dog sized, and you being able to count the ribs on those.
there are places i've hunted where there wasn't any natural food to speak of
other than a few mesquite beans and prickly pear cactus. you can look at the
cactus "leaves" and see all the little semi-circle cut outs where the deer have
been taking bites out of it so as to have something in their bellies.

just me- i don't really care how anyone else chooses to put their deer away
as long as they leave me alone to do it how i wish to legally do it.
i've "meat shopped" on large ranches from a high rack, we've done some
"daniel boone" hunts back in the days when it was feasible to do walk around
hunting, hunted in minimal hang-on tree stands with a bow, hunted in luxury
box blinds that had a bunk and solar powered fans and television and a potty
in the corner, i've sat in a brushpile while sleet was dropping all over me.
my problem is with these folks these days that want EVERYONE to shoot only large
"trophy" bucks and don't want to allow those that want a doe or young buck
to take one by however they legally able to.

The United States doesn't have a gun control problem.
We have a people control problem.

Honor the Texas flag;I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas,
one state under God, one and indivisible.
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post #30 of 32 (permalink) Old 11-25-2018, 04:17 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mannyrock View Post
With food plots, you are tilling the soil, planting, and putting the entire thing at the risk of nature. Sometimes, there is too much rain, and nothing comes up. Sometimes, there is too little rain, and nothing comes up. Sometimes, the whole thing comes up, and grasshoppers wipe it out. Sometimes, it comes up great, and for some reason we don't understand, the deer will never come to it. Sometimes, it comes up great, and the deer or other animals totally wipe it out 5 days before rifle season.
Been there and done that in every instance including forest fire (1998) and no sub-freezing weather (E. Central Florida in any hunting season) to turn the sap to sugar. Mine was a rhetorical sort-of question and to each his own in the pursuit of game and meat for the table if the pursuit is legal. You cannot eat the antlers, at least I don't think so anyway. Maybe mice and other woodland creatures scrape off some calcium from them.

I could be envious of those with an abundance of chances and choices in which deer to kill. Pass this 8-point and that, which deer to me would totally be trophies. See large groups of deer every day. For me, a little success has to span a lot of time

It has been nice to have hunted regularly in a state which allows the taking of multiple deer (2 a day up to 8 in hand) in a single season rather than a limit of one or two, which must seem overindulgent to those with very small State limits. It has been nice to hunt where hunters are welcomed rather than loathed. It has been nice to sit with conservative friends around the camp fire and share experiences. I think the cumulative laughter has been good for the soul as well as community stewardship in support of the wildlife.
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