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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-10-2018, 04:50 PM Thread Starter
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Wife "won" a bow hunt for me a few weeks ago. As far as I can remember, I don't think I have ever stepped foot in Kansas. The hunt will be 10-17 Nov 2019. Trying to do some prep work. Folks that have actually hunted there, what kind of weather should I expect. Will be hunting in the area of Glen Elder, KS. Have hunted Mississippi all my life (I'm 54 now) and bow hunted with a co-worker a few times in the U P Michigan in Oct. Left here fighting mosquitoes, wearing shorts and flip flops. arrived there, 3 inches of snow. 1st time to draw a bow wearing insulated coveralls!


Have seen some of the deer posted on the outfitters site and boy I am excited!!!! Any suggestions regarding boots, clothing, expectations, equipment will be appreciated. Thanks in advance!


Monte

Last edited by Monte64us; 12-10-2018 at 04:52 PM. Reason: Add information
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-10-2018, 04:59 PM Thread Starter
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I do shoot a crossbow...... and pretty dang good on a target, but that ole "Buck Fever" hits me awfully hard so I'm thinking max distance will be 50 yds. am horrified that I would wound one of those great deer stretching out further. I know I will be adding lumenocks to the bolts and will check my zero for sure.................
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-12-2018, 03:10 PM
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good luck on the hunt. I just never could get used to the idea of hunting with sticks.
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-12-2018, 09:16 PM
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The boots you have should be good. Buy a couple pair of medium weight merino wool hiking socks. One pair on your feet the other in your pack, in case your feet get cold change into the dry socks. Take extra steps to start every morning with bone dry boots and socks. Have camp shoes to allow time for drying boots. You want room in those boots to wiggle your toes. Too tight will mean cold feet period.

Think about a windproof layer. Iím envisioning wide open spaces and the occasional river bottom or shelter belt. That wind has about 400 miles of uninterrupted space to gain speed.

Be sure to ask the outfitter letting him know 105 degrees in 100% humidity is what you are accustomed to. Call a day or so before you leave and ask about expected weather.

Think layers. Silk weight long johns, lightweight puffy jacket maybe a vest too. If you have a quiet rain gear throw that over the top and you should be good to 35 degrees for a few hours. Iíd do 20 myself but my furnace runs hotter.

Gloves need not be a big deal. 3 pair of jersey knot that have gone through the wash a few times. As they get damp take them off and put on another pair. Buy the hand warmer packets and use them liberally donít freeze for want of opening a $1 packet. I love stuffing one under my shirt collar feels like the sun on my neck, I swear by it.


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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-12-2018, 10:49 PM
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I would suggest some synthetic knit military surplus glove liners or milsurp aircraft mechanics gloves with leather palms and finger faces combined with an insulated muff with a nylon belt(November UP deer hunting kit). Arctic mittens with wool mitten liners will work too, but you won't drop the muff if you put the belt on!

If you cannot find surplus glove liners, commercial liners and big puffy mittens or toasty ski gloves ($$) are available at REI.com. Consider adding thin wicking liner socks to the merino hiking socks as a base layer. Fleece hat with windproof liner(Mountain Hardwear). Good quality Goretex hiking boots large enough for liners and medium weight wool socks. If you have cold feet, consider insulated puffy fabric overboots to pull on at the blind. Mediumweight long underwear tops and bottoms. Neck gaiter or wool scarf can save the day. I use my cold weather waterfowling parkas with insuleated bibs when Michigan gets cold. Bibs a little longer than normal pant length will keep your ankle sand feet warmer; roll 'em up for the walk in Layers are good if you have to hike in to a blind. I wear a wicking orange turtleneck under an orange wool shirt under my camo.

High energy snacks help with a mid morning warmup....chocolate bars, fruit bars, nuts, take more rather than less. Non-caffeinated drink, piss bottle. Dense foam cushion if blind seat is not padded. Tuck binoculars, rangefinder inside your coat to reduce risk of fogging.

You should be able to find historical weather records for your hunting area on line. If you're not tech savvy, head for your public library and ask the reference librarian to help you get started.

Good Luck!
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 12-27-2018, 03:24 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks folks! I appreciate the info. Sure I will ask some more questions as I get closer to the hunt.
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-08-2019, 05:15 PM
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Just saw this so as a life long Kansan here is my .02 cents worth. CHECK THE FORECAST! Weather can be practically anything that time of year. Typically it will be highs in the 40s to low 60s with lows from the 20s to the 40s but can be much colder. Significant wind is common that time of year. About that time this year much of the northern part of the state was in near blizzard conditions.
A few years ago on opening day of pheasant season (Second weekend of November) the high was 90! So...once again CHECK THE FORECAST and have clothing for about any kind of weather. It can get really cold really quick up in a tree stand on a cloudy day with a 20-30+ mph wind blowing.
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