Sharpening knife to razor sharpness - Page 2 - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #11 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-10-2018, 05:30 PM
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Sharpest knives I ever used were finished on a felt wheel with rouge. Whole different level....shaving sharp. Probably too sharp for kitchen work.

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post #12 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-10-2018, 05:36 PM
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It appears Kwik Sharp Crock Sticks are no longer made, they're much longer than others I've tried, I have a set of shorter sticks than have two angle choices as well as course and fine rods that I've carried when elk hunting, they work Ok, but not as well as the longer Crock Sticks similar to the one in the ebay link, it's real easy to maintain the angle by keeping the blade vertical while stroking down on the sticks and alternating sides, just a few strokes on each side gets you a very sharp blade, I clean the rods with Barkeeper's Friend or Comet.

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post #13 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-10-2018, 06:34 PM
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I have found out that if You wont to keep a knife sharp, don't show your wife where it is stored.
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post #14 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 11:00 AM
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I have 6 years on a kill floor in a beef plant, thank goodness I'm not.doint that anymore!!! We generally used a high carbon blade made by Green River, they also had what they called high carbon, stain free. I didn't like those as much, we mostly used a two sided stone like the one in the pic above. Every morning on the way to the floor we stopped at the knife shop and got fresh knives that had been run through the hollow grinder. Then we used the stone to put an edge on, and a steel to keep the edge straight. Now I'm lazy, I use a lansky tool. Put a 20 degree bevel.with a super coarse diamond stone, then a 25 degree edge with a medium and fine, steel it between stone changes.

I'm glad you're not doing that anymore either. It's not good long-term work. Did you happen to use burnishing steels?

Not sure what you mean by burnishing steel, everyone generally had two, one with fairly course lines on it from the factory, then a smooth one you would put lines on with a piece of Emery cloth, for fine work.
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post #15 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 11:06 AM Thread Starter
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The way I've heard burnishing steels described for people working in meat packing houses is that they people that do the first big cuts of the carcasses that are still hanging use them. They need the knives to be very sharp or it slows them down too much, so they reach over and use a fairly smooth steel to restore maximum sharpness multiple times per day.
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post #16 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 11:16 AM
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The way I've heard burnishing steels described for people working in meat packing houses is that they people that do the first big cuts of the carcasses that are still hanging use them. They need the knives to be very sharp or it slows them down too much, so they reach over and use a fairly smooth steel to restore maximum sharpness multiple times per day.

Yes, everybody had a smooth steel, not everybody used the rough one. I had both, and a ceramic on a handle, didn't use the ceramic, or the rough steel too much. Rough steel when.you accidentally banged your knife on something, ceramic as a final after stoning, depending on the job you were doing that day. Use the ceramic if you needed a super fine edge
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post #17 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 11:19 AM Thread Starter
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Yes, everybody had a smooth steel, not everybody used the rough one. I had both, and a ceramic on a handle, didn't use the ceramic, or the rough steel too much. Rough steel when.you accidentally banged your knife on something, ceramic as a final after stoning, depending on the job you were doing that day. Use the ceramic if you needed a super fine edge

Do you happen to know the optimal type of sharpening for filleting fish? I would assume razor sharp mirror smooth is best, but I really don't know. I'm wanting to get to a new normal where I can make very smooth slices to do the job. In other words, improving my technique.
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post #18 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 12:14 PM
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I once read an article on knife sharpening which drew a contrast between a "razor" edge and a "slicing" edge. He said that a razor should have a very smooth edge to cut the hair without lateral movement. The slicing edge however benefited from a slight (microscopic) roughness kind of like a serrated edge, but very fine. I am not sure what he said to achieve both, but I think he left out stropping for the slicing knives. Also on working knives he wanted a slightly heavier bevel so the edge wouldn't roll like a very fine edge (straight razor) will do.
That has been my own experience, for dressing game and cutting up to package a finely polished edge such as a hard Arkansas stone or leather strop is more hindrance than help. I much prefer the edge I get with the fine waterstone or even a fine carborundum stone.
Again, I really like this knife.
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post #19 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 12:56 PM Thread Starter
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That is a beauty!

It is. I see that Damascus steel is quite popular now. What are the advantages? I also have seen layered steels where there's a thin layer of hard steel sandwiched between layers of softer steel.
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post #20 of 37 (permalink) Old 04-11-2018, 12:58 PM
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Yes, everybody had a smooth steel, not everybody used the rough one. I had both, and a ceramic on a handle, didn't use the ceramic, or the rough steel too much. Rough steel when.you accidentally banged your knife on something, ceramic as a final after stoning, depending on the job you were doing that day. Use the ceramic if you needed a super fine edge

Do you happen to know the optimal type of sharpening for filleting fish? I would assume razor sharp mirror smooth is best, but I really don't know. I'm wanting to get to a new normal where I can make very smooth slices to do the job. In other words, improving my technique.

To me how fine an edge you want for filleting fish would depend on your style. Do you cut.around the ribs, or through them? If I am doing a few fish, I go around them. If I'm cleaning a bunch, like for instance myself and a couple of the kids catch a big mess of perch I cut through the ribs, but I use an electric knife, then after I get all the fillets off, I take the ribs off. My lansky tool has a fairly fine stone like an oil stone, indo use it on my fillet knives, but only go medium fine with the knives i use for feild.dressing and skinning.
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