Turkey necks, pig ears, etc. - Graybeard Outdoors
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-21-2017, 11:57 AM Thread Starter
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Default Turkey necks, pig ears, etc.

There's a whole universe of cooking that I don't know about, and that's the one that uses bargain meats. I see them for sale a lot in southern supermarkets. Cut up turkey necks, pig ears, and some others. Low cost compared to other meats. What are they used for, and is it any good?
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-21-2017, 12:24 PM
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-21-2017, 04:37 PM
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We used to butcher 20 pigs a year when I was a boy, and had our own smokehouse...Pigs ears, noses, etc were made into souse, held together by a gel, this with cracklins, and sweet potatoes made a good meal...We also ate the hog jowl or jaw, pigs tail, and of course the intestines or chitlins...So for us at least, it was more than seasonings...Very little was wasted, the fat was rendered into lard which was used all year...
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-21-2017, 05:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flintlock View Post
We used to butcher 20 pigs a year when I was a boy, and had our own smokehouse...Pigs ears, noses, etc were made into souse, held together by a gel, this with cracklins, and sweet potatoes made a good meal...We also ate the hog jowl or jaw, pigs tail, and of course the intestines or chitlins...So for us at least, it was more than seasonings...Very little was wasted, the fat was rendered into lard which was used all year...
We didn't kill but two or three, but it was like you said, eating wise.
loved them cracklins, and breakfast the next morning was brains and eggs.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-22-2017, 09:24 AM
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-22-2017, 10:40 AM
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Don't forget about smoked ox tail. Mighty tasty eatin'.

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-22-2017, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
There's a whole universe of cooking that I don't know about, and that's the one that uses bargain meats. I see them for sale a lot in southern supermarkets. Cut up turkey necks, pig ears, and some others. Low cost compared to other meats. What are they used for, and is it any good?
what should belong in that list (and used to be) is wings of any kind, ribs and briskets.
i still use the turkey neck to boil along with the wings for gravy for dressing.
i'd never pay good money for wings like so many thousands do these days.
it'd take a five gallon bucket full for a meal.

a lot of trendy foods these days are kind of a twisted carry over from the days
when the common man didn't have much of any money to feed the family, and
they utilized things that would otherwise be fed to the dogs or the hogs.
wings, ribs, tripe, poor cuts of meat, bitter greens, funky odd looking vegetables, etc.
there are also many traditional dishes that are would be considered a delicacy
in modern times. chili is one. chili was invented by the old ladies in the market
in san antonio de bexar to utilize the old tough stringy beef that was available
in the region at the time. the spice was used to cover up the funk. in the 1800's
a man bought chili if he was relatively poor and couldn't afford a steak when
in a town. if i remember reading right, it was a nickle a bowl in the cattle drive days
of the late 1800's

there's a lot of things i'd never consider eating unless i was very hungry and
didn't want to starve.

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-22-2017, 02:59 PM
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Bought a bag of pig ears for my dog once. Looked like rawhide to me.
I might have borrowed a biscuit once or twice, but would've never taken one of his pig ears.

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-22-2017, 04:47 PM
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flinklock, when I was a kid my grand mother cooked chitlins but they boiled them about a half away mile away. They were an acquired taste. And turkey necks were fried for us to pick out the meat like an appetizer. Those were good days.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-27-2017, 10:03 AM
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It's funny how sometimes bargain meats can become fashionable then suddenly get expensive. Ribs were once considered a bargain meat. If you come across a person in their 90's in the coastal New England area they are old enough to remember when Lobster was considered a poor man's food.

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