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  Topic Review (Newest First)
04-06-2017 05:45 PM
doublebass73
Quote:
Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
It was a revolutionary time indeed. Nothing else like it. You're right about the constraint situation. It wasn't just the music industry, it was society at large. Just looking at the pop charts of the day is remarkable. The beatles et al were making hits, but there were also hits like Purple People Eater and the theme from Love Story. You don't see much of that today.


I'm reading this book now. If you like jazz and similar genres of music, you will probably like it too, even if you're militantly against or phobic of saxophones. It's really well done. The guy that wrote the book did great research, and got a lot of his information from people who hung out with the jazz greats. There are a lot of stories in there that I've never seen elsewhere. If you like the Ken Burns videos on jazz, this complements them nicely.


https://www.amazon.com/Devils-Horn-S.../dp/0312425570
That looks like a good book, I loved the Ken Burns documentary. I definitely love playing with sax players.


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04-06-2017 05:41 PM
doublebass73
Quote:
Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
I play baritone sax, and I remember getting used to it. I'd practice for a half hour and then needed to go lie down for a while. 16 pounds of plumbing around your neck like that is an acquired skill in itself. The bass sax is much larger than the bari, and a lot of performers don't use a stand with them. I don't know how they do it. Interestingly, most bass sax players seem to play in the bari range.


I assume you're familiar with the band Morphine?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWKYxhyKja4


There's a good documentary about them:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3743374/
I'm a huge bari sax fan, I like it even more than bass sax. I like Morphine too, I wish I could've seen them live. Bari sax definitely sets my soul on fire. I've played in a jazz band on and off for almost 20 years. We have an excellent tenor player, during one gig he borrowed a bari and I made him play it the entire gig. He wasn't allowed to switch to tenor.

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04-06-2017 03:27 PM
conan the librarian It was a revolutionary time indeed. Nothing else like it. You're right about the constraint situation. It wasn't just the music industry, it was society at large. Just looking at the pop charts of the day is remarkable. The beatles et al were making hits, but there were also hits like Purple People Eater and the theme from Love Story. You don't see much of that today.


I'm reading this book now. If you like jazz and similar genres of music, you will probably like it too, even if you're militantly against or phobic of saxophones. It's really well done. The guy that wrote the book did great research, and got a lot of his information from people who hung out with the jazz greats. There are a lot of stories in there that I've never seen elsewhere. If you like the Ken Burns videos on jazz, this complements them nicely.




04-06-2017 03:20 PM
conan the librarian More in that genre include Monique Ortiz, Bourbon Princess, and Twinemen.
04-06-2017 03:18 PM
conan the librarian
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublebass73 View Post
It's my favorite time period in music, the artists were unconstrained by the record companies so all sorts of interesting music came out of it.

I love all bass instruments, especially the sax. That was a trippy and very cool video! I also love bass trombone and bass clarinet especially. Eric Dolphy played quite a bit of bass clarinet. My son plays clarinet in his high school band so I'm hoping he'll migrate to the bass clarinet at some point.

I play baritone sax, and I remember getting used to it. I'd practice for a half hour and then needed to go lie down for a while. 16 pounds of plumbing around your neck like that is an acquired skill in itself. The bass sax is much larger than the bari, and a lot of performers don't use a stand with them. I don't know how they do it. Interestingly, most bass sax players seem to play in the bari range.


I assume you're familiar with the band Morphine?


There's a good documentary about them:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3743374/
04-06-2017 02:54 PM
doublebass73
Quote:
Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
I like that first one, Lazy Smoke, especially. Both are quite a nostalgia trip. Speaking of trips, pass the chianti and a hit of acid. That seems to have been a great time to learn music because there was so much creativity and competition and hope.

Now, if you've had two hits of acid, you might want to try this bass of another kind...

https://youtu.be/1r96rjfqTgA
It's my favorite time period in music, the artists were unconstrained by the record companies so all sorts of interesting music came out of it.

I love all bass instruments, especially the sax. That was a trippy and very cool video! I also love bass trombone and bass clarinet especially. Eric Dolphy played quite a bit of bass clarinet. My son plays clarinet in his high school band so I'm hoping he'll migrate to the bass clarinet at some point.
04-05-2017 09:19 PM
conan the librarian
Quote:
Originally Posted by doublebass73 View Post
Conan, since I know you're a music geek here's a salty song for you:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-TvbSiIzUQ

The band is an obscure 60's rock band from Massachusetts named Lazy Smoke, they only pressed about 500 copies of this album so it goes for big money on the collector's market. The singer sounds exactly like John Lennon. The guitarist still plays locally to this day in the New England area.

The guitarist was also in this band called Euclid with a good friend of my father, they cut this album in 1970. My father's friend Gary was the singer. I have a beat up copy of the album that my parents played to death when I was a kid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kmEIQt4KXh8

The guitarist was later in a band with the guy who taught me how to play bass, I don't think they ever recorded though.

I like that first one, Lazy Smoke, especially. Both are quite a nostalgia trip. Speaking of trips, pass the chianti and a hit of acid. That seems to have been a great time to learn music because there was so much creativity and competition and hope.

Now, if you've had two hits of acid, you might want to try this bass of another kind...

04-05-2017 01:42 PM
conan the librarian I'm sorry about your Dad. I hope he did alright after that.


In our case, we have just generally reduced use of salt over time. Our most recent gradual change has been that we don't put much salt into our cooking, but just sprinkle a little on the surface when we serve the food. We just stumbled on it because some of the food was too bland and needed a little salt. I've since read that it's a good technique because the salty flavor hits your tongue first, and that makes it seem saltier than it is.
04-05-2017 01:38 PM
doublebass73
Quote:
Originally Posted by conan the librarian View Post
I looked them up. They were a touring group for quite a few years, and all of them are accomplished musicians.


I remember when that was a normal hair style. Wow. I never liked that style, but have always liked the beehive hair style that was popular around the same time.




Well, maybe not this particular "bride of Frankenstein" one...
http://www.viraltales.com/wp-content...140421bc2a.jpg


But more like this...
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com...ac6a942a28.jpg
I always thought Dusty Springfield looked good with the beehive.
04-05-2017 12:23 PM
nanuk-o-dah-nort my Dad had a heart attack back in 1980.... Mom cut out all the salt from our food.

in a year to two, I could hardly stand fast food, and restaurant gravy.

I started asking if the cooks smoked, as it seems smokers use ALOT more salt than the rest of us
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