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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-04-2018 06:06 PM
mannyrock Wow Rid. You really know your stuff!

Thanks for the info.

The Minwax I have always used is the oil based stain, not the one-step product. But, the can says the product "stains and seals."

Mannyrock
11-04-2018 05:39 PM
rfd minwax offers raw water or oil based stains, and one step stain finishes - there is huge difference and you know what you need to do with each, yer choice.

there is such a variation to all all genus of wood that you'll NEVER know PRECISELY how a stain will look on YOUR wood. that's just the way it is. you can always test stains in barrel channels and lock mortises where they won't be seen,

*IF* you want a quality stain, use a laurel mountain forge (LMF) stain color of yer choice, followed by either true-oil (TO) or minwax wipe on polyu. LMF also offers permalyn finish. if i had my choice of these 3 finishes, and i do, i prefer true-oil. this will be a great looking and durable, protective finish that pretty much finishes itself quickly. i've done MANY trad muzzleloaders this way, LMF and TO, quite easy.

*IF* you have a hankering for a "period correct" gun stock finish, heat in aqua fortis then spend a few weeks rubbing in raw linseed oil. beware that you need to know what yer doing with aqua fortis as it's a serious acid! been there, done that, works well, but a waste of my time and effort when i could get a great finish with LMF and TO.

ymmv.
11-02-2018 08:39 AM
mannyrock I have used Minwas alot in my ten years of home repair, all for staining quality pieces of hardwood for different projects.

And unfortunately, I have always found that the color of the stain on the label NEVER matches the color of the wood after you apply the stain. No matter what I do, it always comes out much lighter.

So, what I have had to do is always test the first can of stain I buy on an identical piece of wood, and then go back and buy another color of the stain a shade darker. A few times, I have had to go back twice and get a third color.

Since I would never return an opened can, I end up with lots of cans of unused product. But if you reseal the lid real tight, the stain will stay good for 5 years or so.

It also helps to put the first coat of stain on really thick, to the point where it is almost dripping off, and let it sit for 20 minutes, and then wipe it off with a heavy cotton rag. The reason is, if you put the first coat on thinly, then a second coat applied later will not absorb very much at all, since Minwax is not only a stain but also a sealer. The second coat wants to sit on the surface and run off the wood.

Above all, test everything first.

Hope this helps.

Mannyrock
11-02-2018 08:15 AM
rfd a few kit flinters ...
11-02-2018 08:00 AM
rfd i've assembled no less than 8 investarms flintlock rifles. investarms guns are rebranded as lyman, dixie gun works, cabelas, and a few others. they're all essentially the same. these are pretty good "screwdriver" kits, they pretty much go together by themselves. some thoughts, if you will allow ....

i never brown or blue the barrels, but allow them to patina on their own, that's the way most guns were done back in the day.

i stain the stocks with either laurel mountain forge stains or minwax, and clear coat with either true-oil or minwax wipe on gloss ployu. the key is to prep the wood smooth to at least 320 grit. any and all imperfections will show up in the finishing, so look it all over carefully in good light and whisker the wood between sandings.

after the wood is stained and before the clear coating, i wick in water thin CYA (cyanoacrylate super glue), using pieces of paper toweling as brushes, to the barrel channel and lock mortise - this helps with bp residue fouling getting into the wood. any hobby shop grade CYA will work fine, i use 'hot stuff'.

*if* you have the tools to do so, scratch a witness mark on the breech plug and barrel, remove the plug and anti-seize grease it (permatex @ auto stores, works fine). before screwing in the touch hole liner, do the same to it as well. bp residue WILL get into all those threads and make it really hard to remove them, anti-seize grease will allow them to easily screw out. if you can't remove the breech plug, no sweat, at least do it to the liner.

drill out the liner's touch hole with a 1/16" drill bit, that'll be a big help with ignition. no drill press required, just chuck the bit into a hand drill and push slowly - there's only about 1/16" of metal at best to drill out.

drill a 1/16" hole into each of the ramrod's brass ferrules, lightly countersink the 4 holes with a larger drill bit twizzled in yer hand, drive in a 1/16" brass or iron brad, clip the ends close, peen the ends into the countersink with a hammer, file the peened ends flush with the ferrule. not doing this will almost guarantee the glued-in ferrules will pull out sooner than later. some of the wooden rods have threaded ends to fit the ferrules - just a bad as glue, they all need pinning.

the investarms lock geometry is ok but not great and can use some help. do NOT use the cut flint that comes with the kit - throw it away, it's junk. buy and use only english black or french amber REAL flints. with the [email protected] set to half and hammer steel (frizzen) closed on the pan, set the flint in a wrap of thin leather (NOT lead) in the [email protected] jaws so that the flint's edge is either a hair away from touching the frizzen face, or at least as close to it as possible. this may mean flipping the flint so that its bevel is down and not up. the idea is to strike the frizzen face as high as possible, for the longest scrape of the flint, to cut off as much hot sparking metal as possible.

all bets are off unless you use real black powder in the pan at the very least. for many decades all i use for flinters is quality 3f in both the tube and pan, there is no need for 4f in the pan. with a .54 i'd start off with 50 grains of 3f and work up from there as need be.

99% of all offshore trad muzzleloaders have patent breeches, the GPR is no exception. the touch hole is drilled into an ante-chamber who's bore is smaller than the bore of the barrel. when you run a patched jag down the tube to clean out the bp residue between shots, it will never get into the ante-chamber. this requires swapping out the jag for a .30 or .32 caliber brush, drape it with a patch, and use it to get into the ante-chamber. if you only clean the tube, you will be pushing bp crud into the ante-chamber and that might be a serious issue for reliable ignition.

the above is for starters, have fun!
10-26-2018 06:50 PM
Josh McDaniel I have been browsing Lowe’s website and So far I have found these candidates:

https://m.lowes.com/pd/Minwax-Wood-F...l-oz/999913869


https://m.lowes.com/pd/Minwax-Wood-F...l-oz/999913775
10-26-2018 06:41 PM
Josh McDaniel
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamnelson View Post
I have done plum brown and blue, and I do like the plum brown best on traditional muzzleloaders. And I concur on the minwax for this application, although I did one just with linseed oil, and its going on 30 years without needing a touch up.

I would love to see some pics of that! Yea the plum brown looks good imho.
10-26-2018 06:21 PM
teamnelson I have done plum brown and blue, and I do like the plum brown best on traditional muzzleloaders. And I concur on the minwax for this application, although I did one just with linseed oil, and its going on 30 years without needing a touch up.
10-26-2018 05:12 PM
Josh McDaniel
Quote:
Originally Posted by DEACONLLB View Post
I have found the minwax brand stains the best for stock work walley world carries a good line of it in our area but all woods react different to the same color of stain so you may need to find some scrap wood same as the gun and experiment. If you lifted the pictures off the net by any chance did it mention color and brand of stain also contact the company that makes the kit they may have some color recommendations for you. go real slow on the fitting don't remove all wood at once remove and try remove and try you can always remove more you cant put back.



Deaconllb
I will do that for sure. I am not much of a wood worker, but i do alot of blacksmithing, and grinding metal is very similar. you take it slow, once you take it off, you cant put it back.
10-26-2018 04:22 PM
DEACONLLB I have found the minwax brand stains the best for stock work walley world carries a good line of it in our area but all woods react different to the same color of stain so you may need to find some scrap wood same as the gun and experiment. If you lifted the pictures off the net by any chance did it mention color and brand of stain also contact the company that makes the kit they may have some color recommendations for you. go real slow on the fitting don't remove all wood at once remove and try remove and try you can always remove more you cant put back.



Deaconllb
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