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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-05-2020 10:32 AM
doublebass73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkgael View Post
Trying unsuccessfully to wrap my head around "146 inches of snow".
It was pretty crazy. Snowshoes were mandatory for going in the woods. It took forever to melt too. I remember scouting for turkeys during the last week in April, the week before the season started and there was still 2 feet of snow on the ground.
02-04-2020 07:34 PM
Bob Riebe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkgael View Post
Bob: what is it like this year?
We have about 6 incheson the level where I am at after the 40 degrees two days ago.
Even with supposed above average amount, according to the weather service, pretty much an average year except this winter, starting in Dec. with the below zero it has been far from a cold one.
Any winter , in the true middle of Minn. without any at least -20 days is to me a warm one.
The snow came before the ground froze hard so the frost is not very deep in the ground which means a lot went into the ground before it froze hard.

A few years back we had a truly cold winter , with snow falling after the frost was already inches deep and then we never had more than a foot or so on the level so the frost went deeeep.
Even where I am at and the water pipes are six feet down people were told on the coldest nights it would be good idea to leave faucets trickling.
I had to put an electric heater on on the water main in my home town.
/At that, where I am now, there is a hill on the boulevard that during the late aughts to turn of the decade, was NEVER snow covered all winter; I was so glad when real winter returned and it has been snow covered now since around 2012.
02-04-2020 07:17 PM
Bob Riebe That is one thing , up here in Minn. we get record cold but our snow fall, even in record years tain't nothin compared to Michigan and New York.
Our deepest ever measured is only 154 inches while Michigan and New York are over 100 inches deeper but then they get the Great Lakes effect -- NOT that I want even 100 of inches on the level.


I do remember as a teenager out by my Grandpa's farm standing on top of a snow drift and looking down at the cab roof of the snow plow that was stuck there; I also remember going hunting and walking carefully on packed snow drifts then finding a soft spot and suddenly being up to the middle of my chest in snow, but those really WERE the good old days and I miss them.
02-04-2020 04:24 PM
Darkgael Trying unsuccessfully to wrap my head around "146 inches of snow".
02-04-2020 09:05 AM
doublebass73 The most snow I've seen in my lifetime was the winter of 07-08, my town got 146 inches of snow. None of the storms that winter were that big but it snowed what seemed like every day. We got a lot of snow the following year as well.

Last winter we got a lot of snow as well, we had 4 feet of snowpack on the ground for most of the winter. This winter has been mild with not a lot of snow. The snowpack is probably only a foot right now.
02-04-2020 04:39 AM
Darkgael
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Riebe View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkgael View Post
I wonder about that. Further East in PA, during the years 2005-2015 I was able to ski regularly on slopes with natural snow. During the last four years those slopes have had no snow and no skiing.e
Well Pete; I am approx 15 miles from a ski hill, in the early eighties there were several years where they were only open part time as it was too warm to make snow and when they did it melted.
I hitched hiked home in Feb. in a fall jacket.


A short time later we had -40 in winter and ten years after that we again had record sub-zero weather state wide.
Bob: what is it like this year?
02-03-2020 07:09 PM
Bob Riebe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darkgael View Post
I wonder about that. Further East in PA, during the years 2005-2015 I was able to ski regularly on slopes with natural snow. During the last four years those slopes have had no snow and no skiing.e
Well Pete; I am approx 15 miles from a ski hill, in the early eighties there were several years where they were only open part time as it was too warm to make snow and when they did it melted.
I hitched hiked home in Feb. in a fall jacket.


A short time later we had -40 in winter and ten years after that we again had record sub-zero weather state wide.
02-03-2020 06:52 PM
Eyegor Another anecdote: 30-40 yrs ago in central N.Y. we had an annual ice fishing derby that out several thousand folks on the reservoir. Having sufficient ice wasn’t even a question. Over time the event got pushed later into the winter to ensure safe ice. Now every year the question has become “Will we have ice?” This year doesn’t look good. No idea what it means big picture.
NYS Almost Annual Crappie Derby.
02-02-2020 05:23 AM
Darkgael
Quote:
Further examination from around the country revealed that this was not the exception, but the rule, as snow has generally been on the increase dating back many decades. My colleague’s recollection was equally flawed and records indicate that five of the top ten snowiest Februarys in his hometown
I wonder about that. Further East in PA, during the years 2005-2015 I was able to ski regularly on slopes with natural snow. During the last four years those slopes have had no snow and no skiing. Perhaps it is only a local effect but it does start one wondering.

About that CO2 statistic of 0.039% concentration. That was in 2011. (concentrations are normally expressed as ppm/parts per million. 0.039% corresponds to 391ppm). Be careful with that. As is, your interpretation is flawed. You are apparently reacting to the apparently small amount of CO2. The current statistic is 407ppm. Back in the time of the Ice Ages, it was 300ppm.
The flaw is your assumption that such a tiny amount cannot be a problem.
Pete
01-30-2020 08:34 PM
teddy45 The 11 worse snow storms in US history. We only remember the bad winters and forget the average ones.

https://www.thoughtco.com/worst-bliz...istory-1140776
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