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Any practical difference in real world hunting situations?
 

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I dunno... :tango_face_plain: 'specially since you didn't specify what use for the rounds you are envisioning! Hi-ebber, and day is always a hi-ebber, let's give it a bit of a go just for the sake of argument. :tango_face_devil:

I've long heard that the 375 H&H made it's reputation with the 300 grain bullet. And the "standard" weight bullet for the 9.3, is reportedly 286 gr.. We're talking 14 gr. difference here!

Next, I've always lauded the exponentially increased killing effectiveness of a larger diameter bullet diameter when two cartridges are compared. There is no doubt that the larger the bullet's diameter, the greater the killing efficiency of a round! :cool:

Take for example the 243 Win. and the 250 Savage; both with 100 gr. bullets. There is a total diameter difference of .014 in favor of the Savage. Comparing the effectiveness of the two, the 243 is a pretty good (albeit marginal) coyote round while the Savage is probably the best deer cartridge on the market! :tango_face_glasses:

Likewise, when we compare the 9.3 at .366 inches and the H&H at .375, we find the difference is only .009 inches!

They say a picture is worth a thousand words so here is a visual comparison of the two on Ammo Guide. http://ammoguide.com/cgi-bin/aicompare.cgi?sn=LFAEbBKuAt&in=1&xl=1&xxsetindex=160&xxglbl=1

Then here's the ballistic comparison: http://ammoguide.com/cgi-bin/bcompare.cgi?sn=LFAEbBKuAt&docompare=1&xxpms=0|420|60|

I'm sure that if I were to invest the time I could come up with a mathematical formula using the above variables to express the difference in the two cartridges, but you did say any "practical" difference and this here's all been technical difference! :tango_face_sad:

But then I'm gonna be loading up some 9.3x74R's today for use in my Handi this deer season. And, while I can't say for sure, my gut tells me there won't be any "practical" difference between it and a 375 on our South Jawja white tails! :tango_face_wink:
 

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Likewise, when we compare the 9.3 at .366 inches and the H&H at .375, we find the difference is only .009 inches!

I'm sure that if I were to invest the time I could come up with a mathematical formula using the above variables to express the difference in the two cartridges, but you did say any "practical" difference and this here's all been technical difference! :tango_face_sad:

I'll help you out Richard, after all, anyone preparing to use a 9.3x74R's on a South Jawja white tail probably needs all the help he can get.;)

First off a bullet is round, so we need to consider circumference as its true measurement, which by the way possesses the formula c = d x pi.

X = .366 x 3.14 Circumference therefore is 1.149 inches
X = .375 x 3.14 Circumference therefore is 1.178 inches

Can't stop yet, as that bullet is going to create a wound cavity and as Richard knows, a wound cavity is cylindrical - what that means is we have to now determine the volume of that cylinder. That formula is pi x radius squared x height. What we need to know now is - what dangerous animal are we killing? Let's take Richard's ferocious South Jawja white tail possessing 10 inches of vital tissue.

3.14 x (.183 x .183) x 10 = 1.052 cubic inches
3.14 x (.188 x .188) x 10 = 1.110 cubic inches

Therefore that 375 H&H destroys more vital tissue, which I was taught, is very significant when it comes to incapacitation. So there you have it - may the ballistic gods guide you in your quest for that perfect killing machine.
 

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Operating pressure of those two?
BTW I had the 375 H&H and It seemed to me the popular bullet weight was 270.....................however at my vintage I could be mistaken.
 

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Never felt the "need" for an English ladies rifle AKA 375 H&H, but I opted for the Weatherby non-ported 378 throwing 300 grain chunks of metal around. While moose hunting in Ontario, I took quite a ribbing from a few Canuks when comparing the 378 Weatherby cartridge to their 303's but then again, I would just pick out the best Canadian hockey player and tell them that hockey player looked like a Yank - that was always good for a laugh seeing & hearing their reaction.;)
 

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Good evening
Interesting that the game regulators in Africa deemed the 375 H&H as the minimum cartridge to be used there to take the Big 5. Granted they had to draw the line somewhere but obviously the 9.3 was just enough below the "margin" to not be included.
Being a 375 H&H shooter for awhile now have to write it is not the shoulder crushing monster many think it is. But then I do not "lay on a bench" to shoot ours. Cross sticks work much better permitting the body to recoil with the rifle.
 

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Both are fine cartidges. I have the 375 h&h because I got a great deal on a cz550. If I find a 9.3x74r for the same money I will have that one too.

Richard, you using that "Yankee" 9.3x74r brass I sold you?

BB
 

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Good evening
Interesting that the game regulators in Africa deemed the 375 H&H as the minimum cartridge to be used there to take the Big 5. Granted they had to draw the line somewhere but obviously the 9.3 was just enough below the "margin" to not be included.
Being a 375 H&H shooter for awhile now have to write it is not the shoulder crushing monster many think it is. But then I do not "lay on a bench" to shoot ours. Cross sticks work much better permitting the body to recoil with the rifle.
OK I will throw the BS flag on this.
"Africa" setting the minimum of 375 H&H for the Big 5? What is your referance?
 

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He probably didn't mean the entire Continent of Africa but several countries within Africa have a minimum caliber rule relative to the taking of the Big 5/Top 5/Dangerous Game.

"The 9.3x62mm Mauser and the .375 Ruger are also very capable medium bore cartridges and can also be counted on during a dangerous game hunting safari in Africa. However, keep in mind that some countries have a .375 caliber minimum for dangerous game hunting, which means the 9.3x62mm (.366 caliber) would not be legal in those countries. For instance, Botswana, Tanzania, and most provinces of South Africa have a .375 caliber minimum. On the other hand, Zimbabwe has a 9.2mm minimum and you are not subject to a minimum caliber at all on a Mozambique hunting safari."

Taken from this article:https://biggamehuntingadventures.com/best-caliber-for-an-african-safari-hunt/ Plenty more articles from where that came from.
 

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Those Countries that do have a minimum .375 caliber rule do not specify the 375 H&H as the minimum. Just the 375 caliber. Is there any African Country that specifies the 375 H&H as a minimum. Not that I know of.
 

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I've shot quite a few rounds of both of these cartridges... Mostly because I mfg.'d both of those diameter bullets...

ALSO, I was the guy that got the Valmet 412 double rifles, chambered in 9.3x74R brought into this country, so I have worked a LOT with that cartridge.

Anyway, SOME places in Africa DO have a .375 min. on the big 5, but plenty of guys go there and kill buffalo with their 9'3's every year and report them being just fine for that job.

286 is the std. bullet weight for the 74R and for BIG game 300 is the std. for the H&H, both have other weights available from time to time.

For ANYTHING but the biggest big game, they perform very much alike, with the H&H having a slight edge at longer ranges because of it's slight velocity edge.

Back in my wildcatting days, I "improved" the 9.3 case and did chamber one DR for it, here it is, compared to the factory case, both loaded with 286 NP's...



I did not work with it enough, to be quoting any improved velocities here though, so i'm not going to quote any here...

DM
 

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In one of my African hunting books, the author preferred the 9.3 in a Mauser rifle for elephants.
I don't know his bullet weight, and he only described it as hardened lead.
 
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