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Discussion Starter #1
For some time now I've been researching all aspects of the manufacturing of Browning's BPCR and have previously posted production data provided to me by Browning. At my request Browning recently checked their production records once again and in more detail than they had previously done. The following is what Browning found and is an update to the production data I previously posted. To summarize the data below the quantity of "standard rifles" (not including prototypes) produced and sold were:
2,504 rifles made in .45-70
1,329 rifles made in .40-65
316 rifles made in .45-90 Creedmore
All together totaling 4,149 rifles

The details:
Per the factories production records, BPCRs were only manufactured from 1996 through 1998. The total quantity of rifles produced in .45-70 Government was 2,504 (543 in 1996, 1481 in 1997, 480 in 1998). Total .40-65 Winchester production was 1,329 rifles (459 in 1996, 870 in 1997). No .40-65 rifles were manufactured in 1998. Browning noted the production data was not exact but should be close. It was taken from historical sales data, which listed total sales numbers and remaining inventory for each of the years involved. A more accurate number would require a detailed search of the purchase orders held by Miroku, Browning’s contract manufacturer in Kochi, Japan, who manufactured and assembled the rifles. The totals do not include several prototypes made in Browning’s USA facilities, and several more made by Miroku.

In addition to the “standard” .40-65 and .45-70 rifles, 316 Creedmore-Type Long Range rifles were manufactured. 300 were assembled with a windage-adjustable front sight specifically designed for the Creedmore. Shortly afterwards, 16 Creedmores were assembled from spare barrels but additional windage-adjustable front sights were not available. The 16 extra 45-90’s were made up using the standard BPCR front sight, not the windage-adjustable sight. These were sent to Browning's Morgan, Utah facility and later sold.

Wayne
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

TexasMac: Thanks for the information on this rifle. I bought one of the 1996 rifles in .45-70 still NIB at a gun show a couple of months ago. I know prices on these have inflated recently but made a trade on a gun I no longer wanted and was happy with the transaction. With the holidays I've had limited time to use it and shot some smokeless that I had on hand. I intend to switch to black powder as soon as I can shoot up what I have. Even though these have gone up in price I think they're still a bargain compared to what the Shiloh and C Sharps rifles cost. The only drawback that I can see is the trigger which I understand can be rectified by Lee Shaver. Mine isn't too bad but would probably like it even better if it was lightened a bit. Is the trigger hard to remove? I'm not particularly mechanically inclined so hope this is a fairly straightforward job. Have you had Shaver work on any of yours or have you heard from others if they are happy with the results? Thanks
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

Bridger, as a part of my research and my own personal need for a better trigger, I tried both "Dale McGee" trigger modification, the trigger modification kit sold by J&B Innovations, and had Lee Shaver work at 5 triggers for my Browning's. I can tell you Lee's work beats the McGee and J&B mods hands down. Lee says the triggers will break in the range of 1.5 to 2 lbs, which I verified on my rifles.

To answer your main question the trigger is very easy to remove. All you have to do is remove the stock and push out a pin that hold the trigger in place. No hammer is required as the pin should come out easily. Call Lee and he will send you the details and where to sent the trigger. He charges only $25 for the work, which I feel is quite reasonable. It may be a couple of weeks or more before you get the modified trigger and new trigger spring back as Lee waits for a quantities of trigger to work on all at once.

Lee can be reached at Lee Shaver, Gunsmith, 559 NW 7th Road, Iantha, MO 64759, (417) 682-3330. Lee also has a web site at http://www.egunsmith.com/
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

Well I thought I'd see how difficult the stock bolt would be to remove and sure enough it is stuck tight. Couldn't budge it. Any ideas on how to get it loose? Thanks
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

Bridger, I've never experienced a problem removing the stock bolt from my rifles. I suspect your's is just tight. Use a wide blade screwdriver that properly fits the bolt head slot, and be sure the head of the screwdriver does not become wedged between the bolt head and the stock, otherwise you will likely crack the stock. To insure the screwdriver is centered, slip a thick piece of rubber tubing over the shank a few inches above the blade, or wrap the shank with tape until the diameter is slightly smaller than the hole.

Since I did not have the proper screwdriver I made one from a length of steel rod. I ground the tip to perfectly match the bolt head slot and ground the other end flat. This is easy to store in my gun cleaning and tool kit. I also keep an adjustable wrench in my took kit and use it as the lever arm to remove the stock bolt. Therefore I may not have realized how much the stock bolt was tightened by the factory. I also caution you to not overtighten the bolt during assembly as this can lead to cracked stocks also.

Maybe others can comment if they have experienced similar problems.

Wayne
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

Just thought I'd let you know that I did get the stock off. Shined a flashlight down the bolt hole to see where the screw slot was and had no trouble getting it loosened so you know what was happening with my first attempt. Glad I didn't try to force it. Sent the trigger to Lee Shaver and had it back in 9 days. That's good service. Quite an improvement and well worth the minimal cost. Now if it would only warm up so I could get out to the range!!
 

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12/30/02 Browning BPCR Production Data Upda

Bridger, glad everything work out. I sure would have hated to hear you cracked the stock. Lee does do a good job on the trigger sears.
Best regards,
Wayne
 
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