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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question for those of you who know how single action revolvers work. I recently bought an 1860 Colt clone with a problem. When you bring the hammer to half cock the bolt drops into the cylinder notch, locking it in place so the cylinder will not turn. Can anybody tell me how to correct this? :(
 

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1860

The bolt may be misfitted. Try prying the leg that rides the hammer's cam out a bit from the other, into a slight "Y" so it hugs the hammer harder, it should be a spring pressure fit between the frame wall on one side and the hammer on the other. Don't overbend, it can break. If the legs are weak or cracked, there won't be enough pressure to stay atop the cam. Slowly cock the gun, if the bolt drops too soon (before the half-cock notch, it may be the above problem, or you may need a new bolt, it may have had the legs cut too short. Also inspect the hammer's cam that it is not rounded at the top edge or otherwise misshaped and dropping the bolt early.
 

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Thanks for the information, Flint. I think I have a spare bolt around in case I ruin the one in the gun. This revolver has been cut down to a 3" bbl. to make a Porter Rockwell type piece, and I'm lookin' forward to shooting it, but not in the -12 degree weather we're having today.
 

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springs

Aftermarket bolt springs will fit. I noticed that a real Colt spring is often too long for an Italian gun, and needs the tip shortened. Aftermarket same also. However, a percussion needs a stronger mainspring to be reliable. Even the Ruger Old Army has a heavier mainspring than the Blackhawk/Vaquero.
 
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