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Although I have hunted for over 25 years, I am new to reloading. I bought a 22-250 last year and would like to try it on deer. I have read many differing views on using the .22's for deer, but have read a couple of articles by Layne Simpson that say in his experience the 22-250 loaded with good bullets is good for a little over 200 yards. I am an experienced and ethical hunter, so I will definitely keep my shots below 200yds; less than 100 is likely. I just received my Nosler 60 grain partition bullets. I will be using H380 powder. I can't find any reloading information for the 60 grain partition. From what I understand, seating depth and overall length are dependent on each bullet. If anyone has the time to fill me in on what I should be doing to reload this cartridge properly I would be grateful. Please include any load data for this bullet and powder comination.
Thanks,
Good Hunting,
Swamp
 

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In Hornady's 6th addition they list H380 with their 60 grain bullet. Starting load 34.1 grains - max load 39.1 for a velocity of 3500 fps. They were using Hornady cases, 60 grain V-MAX and Winchester WLR primers for this data. If you use the Hornady loading data for a 60 grain bullet...start at the 34.1 grains and work your way up in .5 grain increments until you hit the sweet spot for accuracy. If you have access to a chronometer, then stop when you reach 3500 fsp no mater what your powder charge is. If you do not have access to a chronometer, then watch for pressure signs very carefully. When you get flattened primers, it can mean you have over reached your pressure limit or may just mean there are other problems...not a real good way to tell. If your cases get "sticky", you have definitely went over the pressure limit, back off your powder. With different bullets, different results can be found, but it gives you a general idea where to start. If you seat the bullets into the lands, you will find pressures go up, back off the powder. In a hunting rifle, even a 224 caliber, it is best to use standard loading lengths and good bullet grip to ensure reliability. Hornady lists OAL to be 2.350" Good luck to you, the 60 grain partition should be a good bullet for deer. One other suggestion, the 55 grain Trophy bonded bear claws from Speer is a premium bullet that should work well in your 22-250. They are not cheap, they are around $40 - $45 per 50, but they are a very good bullet for deer.

edited out Nosler 22-250AI information, I represented it as 22-250 data. 11/3/07
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info. The Nosler site refers to "load density" does that refer to the percentage of case capacity used?
Any other information greatly appreciated.
Thanks again,
Swamp
 

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Here is the data out of Nosler 5th edition for the Remington 22-250; H380...Starting load 34.5 grains (load density 84%); max load - 38.5 grains (load density 94%) for 3605 fps. They list H380 as "Most Accurate Powder Tested" for this particular bullet. This was using Winchester cases and Winchester WLR primers with an OAL of 2.350" They say that IMR 4895, H380 and Varget are excellent powders for the 22-250. Varget is of course an extreme powder, meaning it is resistant to pressure changes in a wide variety of temperatures. Yes...load density is the % of the case being full. So a 90% load density means the case is 90% full. It gives you an idea how well the powder will work in your particular application. Generally (not always) a full case of powder performs better that one that is less full. This is because some powders are position sensitive or they have less consistent pressure build up when not full. I said generally, because there is nothing that is a constant. If it were that easy then everyone would be using the same powder. i think you have made some excellent choices in bullet selection and powder selection. Be aware that if you develop your load in the summer, then shoot it in the winter, pressures may drop off and you will get different velocities. Vice-versa if developed in the winter (cold) then shoot in the summer that pressures could go over recommended limits. Varget helps with this a little. Develop loads carefully. Start with recommended levels of powder and work your way up in .5 grain increments. When the accuracy reaches it's smallest point then starts opening back up, you know when you reached that "sweet" spot. If you go through the whole range (do not exceed recommended powder weight) and never reach the point of getting accuracy acceptable to you, then you need to start over with a different powder or bullet. You have made good choices, so I think you will find some where between 34.5 and 38.5 grains an acceptable load. Good luck to you.

Edited 11/3/07
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Warning noted LaOtto222. Thanks for the information. How important is it to have a chronograph? We don't have one yet, and don't really want to buy things that we don't need. If it is a really good idea, can you recommend one that is cost effective?
Thanks,
Swamp
 

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A chronograph is nice to determine what your velocity is. There is no real good way of telling when you approach recommended top pressures. If you look for signs and find them, you are probably over pressure by the time you note them. Primers are a poor way to tell about pressures for a variety of reasons. You can measure case head diameter before and after firing, but again if there is case head expansion you are over the limit, probably way over. Same with sticky cases. By the time you note a sticky case, you are way over the limit. In extreme cases you will have pierced primers or primers falling out of the pocket. Pierced primes do not necessarily mean over pressure, it can be from other causes, but generally too much pressure. The best way to determine over pressure situations is to have a chronograph to measure your velocity as you increase the powder charge. Once you reach the top velocity in a reliable loading manual (or two or three) then you are probably at the upper pressure threshold, no matter what powder charge you are using. It is not real scientific, but probably the best you can do. Some use a chronograph to determine extreme spread, thinking that it will tell them the most accurate load. The theory is the lower the extreme spread, the more accurate. I shoot what is the most accurate on paper and pay no attention to velocity or extreme spread. If the velocity I am getting with my most accurate load is way too low ( I do not worry about 100 fps), I then work up another load, switching powders or bullets. I personally do not own a chronograph. I have a friend that has one that I borrow when I am developing a load. His is a Chrony Beta. They make an Alpha and a Gamma model too. I am not sure when I get one for myself if I would get that one or another brand/model. It is very touchy about lighting conditions, but I think they are all that way to a certain extent. You can purchase chronographs on sale for under $90 or you can pay $250+ for one. It depends on the brand you get and how many bells and whistles you want. How important are they? If you stay with in recommended limits from reliable loading data and use the same components, work up from the lower limit and stop before you exceed their recommendations, you will probably be safe. Chronographs are relatively cheap now, but there was a time when the cost so much no one could afford them, except the rich. When I was early in my relaoding, I had no one to mentor me, there was no internet and I made plenty of mistakes. Even though I had reloading manuals, I would start at the top loads and seat the bullets into the lands causing over pressures. I gas cut the breech face of my T/C through blown primers. I learned through such experiences and now I do not push the limits so hard. I developed a dandy load for my BDL 700 VS 222, it was 24.9 grains of BLC2, WW cases, Hornady 50 SXSP seated .020" off the lands, and Rem 7 1/2 primers. It was not near top pressure, but it shot lights out. I could put 5 into .3 every time if I did not do something dumb. I learned from that too. Good luck to you. and keep us posted on your progress
 

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LaOtto222 - edit your original post so there is no confusion. Either delete the text in its entirety, or substitute your new post. That way someone who does not read the entire thread will not be at risk.


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Be warned, there are LOTS of hunters who think ANY 22 CF is to small to reliably kill deer. I know better. Done it with the .223 a few times. I worry more about accuracy than velocity when working up a load. Hope you have almost as much luck as me !
 

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Lone said:
LaOtto222 - edit your original post so there is no confusion. Either delete the text in its entirety, or substitute your new post. That way someone who does not read the entire thread will not be at risk.
Excellent suggestion, should have thought of it myself ;) :-[ I was so worried about swamphunter using that data, I forgot someone else might use it. Thank you for getting me out of a sticky situation. The bogus data has been edited out. ;D ;D ;D

Swamphunter - I think Tim is saying that you need a Chronograph and that I need to buy one of my own. ;D ;D ;D
 

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I once killed five Kodiak Island blacktails with six shots from my CAR-15 in .223. I used the Nosler 60grain Solid Base bullet, and only recovered one bullet as I recall. The one deer that I shot twice didn't need it, I was just nervous since it did not fall over at the shot. The rest were hit in the lungs and traveled from 10-30 yards before tipping over. One thing I noted was that the deer usually did not give any indication of being hit - they continued doing what they were doing then just tipped over.

All that said, I would not do that again. With precision shot placement the .223 worked fine, but experienced hunters are well aware that you cannot always count on precision shot placement. There are times when you shoot poorly or when the only shots presented are angling ones requiring more penetration than the .223 can give. The .22-250 will deliver a lot more energy than the short barreled CAR-15 did, and it may kill better. But I would not count on successfully penetrating much deer if an angling shot is presented.

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