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Is the .243 enough gun for hogs?

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a Tikka Stainless Synthetic in .243.

People tell me that the .243 is enough gun if you shoot 'em in the ear, or right behind it. I normally like to use my .30-06, 300 Win Mag, and .338 Win. Mag on hogs with Barnes X bullets, but I have heard many people take hogs, even big ones, with the .243.

Do you guys think that the .243 is enough gun for hogs?

Zachary
 

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one of uncle ted's video's, his son rocco shoots a nice hog with a 223. dropped that hog like a stone. i think rocco was 6 when that was filmed(although i could be wrong about the age). anyway, my pointis after seeing that, i dare say that a 243 would do the trick (watching a few videos is the only hoggin' experience i have,unless you count that one night when i had a few too many...). so take that for what it is worth.
 

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It is just like using a 243 for deer. Yeah, it will get the job done, but you'd better be able to hit where you are aiming at and be patient enough to wait for the right shot. You start trying to shoot through a lot of bone with a light bullet, and you might get into some penetration problems. Other than those considerations, go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just noticed from remington's website that they now offer the a 100 grain core-lokt ULTRA in the .243. This is a bonded bullet that retains 85% to 95% of its weight. Of course shot placement is everything, even if you are using a 300 Win. Mag., but the smaller the bullet diameter and weight, the greater the need for a well constructed bullet.

As such, once I get my rifle and have the scope mounted, I will give these bullets a try. If they are accurate (meaning sub MOA) then they will give me a little more confidence on shooting pigs.

Keep in mind that I normally like using my .300 and .338 on hogs. However, where I hunt in Texas, we primarily hunt for deer (in which case the .243 should be fine for shots 100 yards or less), but I may need to take a shot at a hog with whatever gun I have at the time. That's why the 100 grain core-lokt Ultra should give me a bit better insurance.

I understand that I should try and shoot hogs in the head or right behind their "armpit" as the bullet will slip right behind the grisle plate into the vitals. Patience is key, but the reward should be great! :toast:

Zachary
 

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ribs

Them ribs are too darn delicious. You should attempt to pop them in head whenever possible anyway. Go with the weapon you shoot the best.
 

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I have only limited experience in using the .243 and am yet to fully convince myself it is a capable deer round much less hog round. While I've never used it on hogs and likely never will unless one just happens by while I have it in hand for other use I suspect I'd use it only if I could place the bullet in ear or neck on a hog or if the hog was an under 100 pounder.

I've used it on only one deer even and wasn't impressed with the performance but honestly cannot be sure of the bullet placement. I didn't recover the deer. No blood trail and I eventually gave up the search. It was found a few days later by following the buzzards. I wasn't the one who found it and so didn't see the deer but it was over 1/4 mile from where I expected it to be. The buck moved just as I shot and from the last view I had thru scope when the shot went off it should have been a liver hit not lung hit as planned.

I have to assume the 100 grain Hornady bullet didn't exit as I knew where he was standing, found his tracks but never found any blood sign anywhere.

I've not been able to make myself use it on deer since even tho I really like the little rifle I have chambered for it. Sure is wicked on smaller stuff.

GB
 

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On your poll for deer I voted yes. Hogs, now that is a different subject. NO, not enough cartridge[/color]. There is a world of difference between a 250 lb. deer and a 250 lb. hog. Hogs are way tougher. I've seen too many hogs shot with a .243 using 100 Nosler Partitions that ran off, head shots are not always possible. A wounded hog in the brush is nothing to take lightly. I know many a good dog that never reached old age because of tangling with a hog. Pound for pound a hog is as tough as a bear and a .243 IS NOT [/color]a bear gun. Lawdog
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have seen, with my own two eyes, my brother shoot a 200 pound boar with my 7mm Rem Mag and 150 grain power points. (My brother doesn't know much about hunting, just shooting. I told my brother to go to the store and get the 160 Nosler Partitions, but some idiot at the gun store told him that the 150 PPs were better. :roll: )

In any event, he shot that hog on the grisle plate and I literally believe that the bullet, or part of it, BOUCED OFF! [/color]:eek: The hog spun into a wide circle and then ran off. We went to the site and saw ACTUAL PIECES OF BONE! :eek:

Since then, I got a .300 and .338 Win Mag and loaded them with 180 and 225 grain Barnes X respectively. I have shot big boars in the grisle plate and, at least with the 225X, the bullet penetrated both grisle plates.

I would never attempt to take a shoulder shot on a boar (of any size) with a .243. Keep in mind that this is not my primary hog gun. I wanted this .243 because I have 14 other guns and never a .243 caliber. Plus, I think that it will serve its purpose on whitetail deer within 100 yards and, in a pinch, smaller hogs within that same distance.

You guys are right about the ear and neck shots though, they can be tricky because those rascals are always on the move.

Zachary
 

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.243 hogs

I have some nice pictures of delicious hogs that were whacked with a .243
can any one help me with the procedure for posting them?
 

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Assuming that you use a strong bullet, I can't image that a 243 wouldn't kick the crap out of any hog.
I shot a 200lb boar with a measily 44mag and a 265gr jacketed bullet. The bullet hit him just behind the shoulder and went zipping right out the other side. The boar fell right over. The 243 is a powderful cartridge when compared to many pistol cartridges.
Shot placement and bullet design outweigh all other factors IMO.
VH
 

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pig guns......

The Wild Boar hunting guide I hunted w/last spring said they won't guide someone using a .243 Win. or .357 mag pistol!! Said they have lost to many pigs to those rounds to allow it any more, some of these were shot at near point blank range and they still ran off to never be found!

They say a .270 Win. is minimum for hogs, prefer a .30-06, and the guide carried a 7mm Rem. Mag w/premium bullets! My hunting partner shot a nice 200 lb. sow right behind the shoulder at 25 yards w/a .35 Rem and Federal factory 200 grn round nose ammo. The pig went about 50 - 75 yards, half of that in thick brush, before it piled up. We found a piece of the lead core that weighed 50+ grns, on the off side hide, the rest of it was shrapnel - non of it penetrated all the way through!! I shot my 175 lb. boar at approx. 25 yards and hit it behind the shoulder w/my .454 Casull & 260 grn FA JFP ammo. The shot got total penetration, but the pig still went 75 - 100 yards after the shot. When I got to it, the pig got to its feet, and I had to put a .22 mag in it's head to finish it off!! :eek:

THESE ARE TOUGH CRITTERS, if you use a light caliber gun you are setting yourself up to wound an animal & heart ache. IMHO

Good Hunting, Del
 

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Of course you can kill one with a .243, or a 458 or a .22 hornet, but some are not the right tool for the job and you are going to have to pass up a lot of game that you could have taken with the proper gun. These discussions usually revolve around getting the "right" shot for your too small gun. If an proper choice is made there are many more right shots and a lot less frustration which leads to bad shots and lost game. I see these same threads for deer, boar, elk, bear, moose, etc.. The answer should be all the same. Get some idea of what most people consider a good cartridge for that game and use something close, preferably more not less. Shot placement is the key but using a gun with enough power/expansion/accuracy/penetration gives a margin a error for the less than perfect presentation by the game.
If you can only afford one gun you have to make some hard decisions. Choose one at least a power level up from what you think you need, not one a level below what you think you need.
Then learn to shoot it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
As some of you know, I own several rifles in several cartridges. As a young teenager, I started with the then big fast go-go bullets :bye: (my first gun was a 7mm Rem Mag. :gun4: ) Needless to say, I quickly discovered that it was just WAY too much gun for whitetail within 100 yards. I once use it with 150 grain Federal Premium Sierra Boat-tails to shoot a doe at about 50 yards away. I shot her in the shoulder and, upon impact, the poor thing almost made a 360 degree turn IN THE AIR!! :eek: Then I got a .270 Winchester and found it more "reasonable" for my kind of shooting. Since that time, I have bought 13 or 14 more rifles, both big and small.

Anyway, I always considered the .243 to be too much of a peep-squeek :| After a few years, I started hearing, and seeing, quite a few deer taken with a .243.


What I'm really trying to say is that I know the limitations of the .243. Yes, it is a great cartridge for younger children and women, but then again it can be the worst cartridge for them because it gives you little margine for error. Then again, since proper bullet placement is critical, the low recoil will allow them to shoot better.

You see, my thinking is that , I'm not the best shot in the world, but I'm better-than-average (I better be after shooting for over 20 years :wink: ).
As a result, I will "hone in" my shooting skills with the .243 and learn to RE-EMPHASIZE[/color] the importance of placing a bullet exactly where I want it to go. This exercise, first on paper and then on game, should assist me in my shooting all of my other rifles.

No matter how good we are, we can always be better, and I think that shooting a .243 could provide me with an additional insight and perspective with regard to my overall shooting.

Do any of you guys agree with me?[/color] :toast:

Zachary
 

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these hogs hate .243's

If these little piggys had opposeable thumbs, were litterate, and weren't dead, they would vigorously oppose the use of .243's for use on feral swine. Thank you Ironwood for help with photo posting. I know a 243 doesn't cover every situation but it is good fun arguing about it.



if this worked I can show you more little pigs that hate coyote rifles.
 

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Not always

:shock: I personaly have shot only two hogs with my .243. Within 100 yd. plenty for small hogs. But, shooting them in the ear or right behined it dosen't mean a dead hog. My cousin shot a 200 lb. hog right behind the ear with his .243, had the hog fall over, get up, spin around a few times then run off. Never found it.

Shooting behind the ear you run the risk of hitting the hunk of grisle right between the skull and the top of the spine.

In my openion the .243 is no good for decent sized hogs. :sniper:
 

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Justin.... If you intend to shoot a hog in the head. Aim for the ear hole, not behind the ear. Notice in the drawing where the brain is located. It's really not a very big target.



I saved this drawing from an old Peterson's Hunting Magazine.
 

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excellent diagram, After skinning and examining I always figured you wanted to hit em right between the back of the eye and the base of the ear. I was pretty close.

Willis 5, if you were asking about the hogs in the photo, they were all shot in the head or on the "hog button". We always call the area that lies in the middle of the neck, directly in front of the shoulder the "hog button", because when you punch the hog button it drops them right in their tracks. All but one dropped where they stood, lights out. The biggest (200 + lbs ) went 20yds, my friend missed the hog button and shot him right behind the shoulder. No exit wound, slug was under the hide on opposite shoulder.
 

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Yeah. I think that the "hog button"(including ear) is the only place that I would shoot them with a smaller caliber. I think I would opt for a larger caliber for everyday hunting because a "Hog Button" shot is not always an option. Good call though. I hope you don't mind if I call that area the "Hog Button" from now on! Take care!
Cheers,
willis5
 
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