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I have loaded hundreds of rounds of 2506 in 3006 brass. Run the 3006 brass thru 2506 dies, trim the length, chamfer the inside and start low on the powder charge, say four of five grains down from maximum charge, and work up slowly. The case neck will be a little thicker, and after one or two loadings you will have to trim the case length again. Watch the primers for excess chamber pressure, and you will be fine.
I just sold my seventh or eight 2506, and have been shooting the round since 1971 or 72. Great round. ;)
 

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You will also have to turn the necks down because they will be too thick. Better yet go buy some 25-06 brass, turning necks a a royal pain in the butt. The only reason I would turn necks would be for a tight necked target chamber or for a caliber that brass is unavaiable.
 

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Doghunter most of the time you do not have to turn the necks down, just trim the OAL, and start low on the powder charge, like I said. If you want to save money once fired 3006 brass is more plentiful, and usually cheaper, and if you already have some so much the better. The small inconvenience is a one time deal, and in the long run worth the savings. I have found over the years that accuracy also suffers very little if any, when doing this.
 

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I would guess it depends on the gun. My Interarms Mark 10 won't chamber a necked down 30-06 without turning.
 

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billy most chambers will work but, there are those occasional ones that won't. I have owned 7 or 8, in either Winchester, Remington, or Ruger. Two were with varmint barrels, and after I tuned them, they would all shoot under an inch at 100. The tale of the tape is to re-size the brass, trim the length, and load one up. 9 times out of 10 it will chamber smoothly.
 

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I got my first back in '89 and have run a ton of 30-06 cases through it. IT is a Remington BDL and has shot exceptionally well through the years with the only problems being the factory stock.

If your buying your cases you can go either route but I generally went the cheap way and got the 30-06 Winchester cases as the 25's were generally higher in cost. As was mentioned run them through your die to down size them, trim to length and load them up. I have also used Rem., Fed., and hornady cases as well, but the Winchester seemed to always do better in my rifle all else being the same.

(The following contains data developed in a specific rifle and will not necessarily be safe in another. Reduce loads at least 10% or consult manuals for the latest data on components listed.)

Overall I used the Win-WLR primers for 98% of my loads. The bullet weights I used were from 100 through 120 but the majority were 115's. Best powders for the 100's were Imr-4831 and Imr-4350, for the rest Imr-4831, H-4831, and RL-22. The mainstay load for this particular rifle has been the 115gr Partition or Berger, loaded to 56.5grs of RL-22, Win-WLR primer, Win. case Seated to 3.250" AOL. From my rifle this gets me 3150fps and has worked on everything it has been used on from Mule deer to skunks.

Good luck with yours, I am building me an Ackley Improved version to work on next. They are very addicting.
 

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Well... Re: 25/o6 from 30/o6 brass

Can you? yes. Should you??? Welllll....

You can throw in an intermediate step. .270 is handy. .280 Remington also works. Makes the trip into full length .25/'06 slightly easier.
Of course, lube well with a good lube. Lanolin is the ancient standard. Lee washable is about as good IMHO.
If you set the .25/'06 full length die with many trips by the first case into the gun so it closes "tight" you should have minimum headspace/maximun case capacity and less case "work hardening," stretching, etc.
If you want longest case life, an anneal is appropriate. Dip neck in molten lead, PURE LEAD, --hold by rim with fingers and you will know QUICK when to drop into water-- OR buy the propane heaters and templac or templac stick or...

As suggested, .270 is .27/'06 and .280 is .28/'06... Since Uncle Sam no longer leaves free brass laying around, buying any one of these makes perfect sense when you see a deal. No reason you have to use .30/'06. And as is the case, usually, if you try around, your gun will show a preference and get you just that little better performance that makes us handload anyway... happy holidays, luck.
 
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