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What do you gain going from a 130 to 150 grain bullet ?
 

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When comparing similar bullets in the .270 Winchester and having fire my loads across the Chrony I have made a number of comparisons. I also use the Sierra Bullets Infinity program to compare my loads. Within practical deer hunting range the 150-grain bullet offers better penetration and is more like to exit then the 130-grain bullet.

Most of my hunting is in thick cover and broken topography. A deer that has damaged heart and lungs can travel a couple hundred yards and then expire. A good blood trail will assist in recovery.

It has been my experience that many standard 130-grain bullets are on the tender side at close range. At the same range a 150 bullet will open violently but will penetrated deeper or completely depending on shot placement.

For years one of my favorite 130-grain bullets has been the 130 grain Hornady SP. This bullet works great on antelope. It kills deer and the bullet is normally found nicely mushroomed under the hide on the far side. The 150 grain Hornady SP normally exits a deer. The 150-grain bullet is my preferred bullet in two .270 Winchesters. I have post this picture recently, but I will post it again because I believe it shows a successfully expanded 150-grain bullet in the .270 Winchester. It was a factory loaded 150 grain Winchester PP bullet.



The bullet falling in-between the 130-grain and the 150-grain bullet is the 140-grain. Bullet. I have loaded the Hornady 140-grain BTSP and the Winchester (Old) style 140-grain Silvertip boattail. Both bullets are very accurate. I have not taken a deer with the Silvertip, and have taken deer with the 140 grain Hornady. I am using a near maximum loaded with the Hornady bullet. I have successfully taken a number of deer at 100 yards or less. When the 140-grain bullet hits at close range it penetrates and if it hits bone it fragments as bad or worse then the 130 grain-bullet. I believe the 140-grain bullet is more effective then the standard 130-grain bullet.

When I buy additional 140-grain Hornady bullets it will be the bonded bullets because of the number of deer I have taken at close range. And the occasional black bear encounter.

Now days I reserve 130-grain bullets for varmints and target practice. When it comes to future practice loads and the escalating price of bullets, I will practice with 110-grain bullets, and when they are gone I will graduate to the 130-grain bullets I have on hand. I will reserve the 140-150 bullets for final checking of my scopes, and insuring the rifle is dead on with the selected bullet.
 

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If you are using bullets like the A Frame or Partition, I do not think to much difference will be noted moving to the heavier bullet. I have never recovered one of either from a deer. With more basic bullets like the Speer, Sierra, or Hornady soft points, then you will see improved penetration in the heavier bullet. Having said that, I think it is best to go with whatever your rifle seems to prefer.
 
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