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Yes, I have the new G&A, read the article & I wouldn't have one. The 375 Ruger necked down to 338 has some appeal to me, but
these are a waste.
 

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How is a 300 RCM different from a 300 WSM?

Cheese
 

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Everybody has to come out with something and say its better.... hey, check out the 180 grainer on the chart!!!

180 gr. SST - 20" 2900/3361 3000/3597 2707/2928 2802/3139 -1.5 1.6 0.0 -7.1

it goes faster at 100 yards than at the muzzle!! Now a 300 mag with a jetpack sounds good to me!! ;D ;D
 

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corbanzo said:
Everybody has to come out with something and say its better.... hey, check out the 180 grainer on the chart!!!

180 gr. SST - 20" 2900/3361 3000/3597 2707/2928 2802/3139 -1.5 1.6 0.0 -7.1

it goes faster at 100 yards than at the muzzle!! Now a 300 mag with a jetpack sounds good to me!! ;D ;D
Obviously an error on the part of the person/people putting the data up. Two of the entries for the .300 RCM 180g/20” (100 yards and 300 yards) are the same as for the 180g/24” at the muzzle and 100 yards. Oops. The third (200 yard) entry for the 180g/20” is correct for 100 yards.
 

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and most 300 wsm data I have seen has a ME of about 3500

Nothing turns me off than when a company over estimates the recoil reduction due only in part to the lower powder weights. No way can you say a lighter rifle (this is the reason for the cartridge, right) is going to give you noticeably less recoil shooting the same bullet the same speed just because you may be using 60 gr of powder vs 66 gr of powder. That 6 gr of mass gets lost in the fuzzy data when you are shooting 180 gr of bullet or more.

Hornady seems to be pushing the new chamberings now that Rem and Win have basically cooled off. I dont mind that in theory, but dont tell me you have invented something new when you havent. The short mags were innovative, from a factory ammo standpoint, these are just the same but a little less. I see case capacity, bullet weight, bore diameter, as the parameters. Case shape is not a big player when it comes bullet energy performance. Hornady does however, seem to have some gun powder or loading technique I would like to get my hands on.
 

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Someone at a gunshow told me they pulled the bullet on a Hornady Light Magnum cartridge, to see the powder. They couldn't get all the powder back in. He said they had some special loading technique to get it all in. Their light magnums in .308 kick harder than my .300 mag. The .300 mag rifle is about a pound and a half heavier. Don't know if that means anything.
 

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Hi All,

The short mags were innovative, from a factory ammo standpoint, these are just the same but a little less.
Hmmm there can really be no such thing as a "Short magnum" as the Magnum means larger vessel and was taken from Wine making. Now persoanlly I cannot see what the problem is with normal or long bolt throws and actions, it just takes a littel getting used to that's all, but hey what do I know ::) but then again I don't follows fashions and the latest craze.
 

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Brithunter said:
Hi All,

The short mags were innovative, from a factory ammo standpoint, these are just the same but a little less.
Hmmm there can really be no such thing as a "Short magnum" as the Magnum means larger vessel and was taken from Wine making. Now persoanlly I cannot see what the problem is with normal or long bolt throws and actions, it just takes a littel getting used to that's all, but hey what do I know ::) but then again I don't follows fashions and the latest craze.

magnum
n.
1. A bottle, holding about two fifths of a gallon (1.5 liters), for wine or liquor.
2. The amount of liquid that this bottle can hold.
3. A magnum cartridge or firearm.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a cartridge containing a larger explosive charge than other cartridges of the same size.
2. Designed to shoot magnum cartridges


I guess if you want to limit your definition to historical usage as determined by the world of wine, then you would be correct. The problem I have with that is we’re talking about firearms and cartridges where the word ‘magnum’ has a somewhat different meaning. In either case the word ‘magnum’ is derived from Latin ‘magnus’ which essentially translates to ‘large’, big’, or ‘great’. In general case absolute size has little to do with whether or not a cartridge is called a ‘Magnum’. Often a cartridge is considered a ‘Magnum’ because it is the offspring of the original H&H belted magnums. Sometimes a cartridge is considered a ‘Magnum’ because while still relatively small in the greater scheme of things, it is larger than another popular cartridge in the same caliber. The .357 Magnum/.38 Special and .44 Magnum/.44 Special come to mind.

However, back to your original contention that there can be no such thing as a “Short Magnum”. The WSM and SAUM cartridges made up for their shorter length by having an increased diameter. Overall case volume was little changed from their longer bretheren. Unless you are going to contend that a vessel can only be made ‘larger’ by lengthening it, your contention is in error.
 

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Magnum:
(see "magm")
-rednek for "more boom"
-biggrer
-kills stuff deader
-more boom
-happy wife
-keeps the ducks in a row, then kills em all, one shot, ten hundred yards, off hand, and one hand, cause holdn a weiser in the other, while chattin up a coed in the hottub out back of jeds house with the ACDC blastin and the hot dogs steamin.
-gooder for huntin big stuff



The only thing that magnum means, is that there was a cartridge of similar size or shape previous to this cartridge, of which this cartridge now has a larger case, longer case, fatter case, more velocity, more powder, "better engineering," better marketing, or some kind of change which makes an advertisement feasible.

There is no rule. If they make the case just a little different than something else, they can slap magnum on there, and run with it.

I guess you could have a short magnum though. A tennis ball could hold a LOT of powder, and is still about the same length as an -06.... hmmmm ;D

Hey!! Don't let hornady steal my idea!!
 

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Hornaday's Light and Heavy Magnum loads use a proprietary powder, I thought made by Vitahoweveryousayit. And it is certainly jammed in the case. With that technology they may well have a short round that equals or comes close to the .300 Win or .338 Win...but then their ammo (Heavy Mag) in those calibers races ahead again. This trend is for lighter easier to carry guns packing a punch. They must want their share of the pie that the WSM rounds didn't get. The Hawkeyes are nice guns, just reloaded for one the other day.
 

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my guess is they will be short lived at best . makes you wonder who would have the space and money for more new state of the art cutting edge 21st century wiz bang better than ever calibers.
 

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I believe the Magnum label for a cartridge was first used in 1912 for the .300 Super Holland & Holland cartridge. Nowadays it's seems to be slapped on any cartridge the marketers want to hype up the WSM's are a prime example of this. Sorry but the short action bit does not fly again it's a hyped up fashion statement as let's face it the time saved in working a short bolt to a normal of long bolt is so small it actually makes not difference.

So I have no interest in the WSM's heck I still have not got all the old cartridges I would like so why waste my time with cartridges which are likely to dissappear all too soon?
 
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