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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:? Hey, dose the .308 win pack enough punch to take 200 + lb. hogs, out to 200 yards. I'm thinking of geting a .308 win. in a Kimber Classic to replace my winchester .243. I will be using it as an all around gun (deer, yotes, hogs). What is your opinion on this setup? Thanks for your time, Justin
 

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308 is plenty

the 308 is plenty for hogs at that weight considering i have kiled several hogs twice that weight with a marlin 30-30 using 170 gr core lokts and i hit them right behind the shoulders they either drop in there tracks or run about 50 yards. When i hunt them the hogs have n idea i ma around as i try to stay scent free and in some sort of a stand or behind a blind on the ground.
ballistically it is far superior to my old marlin so i would not hesitate to shoot a big hog with one i would use either a nosler partion or at least a 180 gr corelokt by Reminton though that is just my opinion hope i have helped
 

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Ditto

I agree with Howie, your .308 is plenty for hogs. AS Howie mentioned a shot behind the shoulder, a neck shot is very effective as well. Just stay off the actual shoulder itself. Behind the shoulder on a hog quartering away is a reall ideal shot. Have fun
markc
 

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It's a fine gun, and maybe a bit too pretty for hog hunting. :)

I wanted to mention one more thing about the .308. If you want, you can always use the higher velocity rounds from Federal High Energy and Hornady Light Magnum. This type of ammo will turn your .308 into a .30-06.

BTW, on hogs I like to use super strong bullets. Personally, I only use the Barnes X bullet. However, you could probably do just as well with the Trophy Bonded, Swift-A-Frame, etc.

Zachary
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Zachary!

:shock: Thanks, the reason I asked is because my (know it all) cousin told me that the .308 win. is only a small step above the .243 win. Haveing never shot or even seen a .308 before I belived him. Not that I have eny thing against the .243, I took my first two deer and my first two hogs with one. But the hogs were not huge. Both were about 50-60 lbs. One shot in the rear right ham so that the slug came to rest in a front left rib, I still have the slug. Thats pretty good penitration,but I need something with a little more PUNCH for real big hogs. :gun4:
 

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Justin....... The .243 is basically a necked down .308. The difference is more like one gaint leap rather than a small step. :grin: For deer and hog size game, the .308 has about 1000 ftlbs more enegry than the .243. Although smaller in size, as Zachary said, the .308 is not even a "small step" behind the 30-06. With 165 or 180 grain bullets it should be a very good hog cartridge.

 

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Those are nice pictures Ironwood. :p

BTW, if you really want some power for big hogs, I use a .300 Win. Mag. and a .338 Win. Mag. Specifically, in the .300 I use PMC 180 grain Barnes X. I shot a 250 pound hog with it from my Remington Sendero Stainless Fluted. That hog went down like lightning! :gun4:

Now, the .300 is way too much for most deer hunting, but it sure is a charm on BIG HOGS.

If you can handle the recoil, you may consider either the .300 WM or the .300 WSM (short mag).

Zachary
 

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jones creek

Hi Justin, I just got back from a hog hunt near Brazoria. We were fortunate enough to kill 10 hogs there in the last two trips. Five were shot with an .o6, four with a .243 and one with a .223 shooting a 55gr BTHP coyote bullet. Their live weights ranged from 90lbs to 250lbs, the largest one was shot behind the shouler at 100yds with .243, it went about 20yds before it died. We always try to shoot them in the head, or right on the "hog button" in order to protect the sacred ribs for our smokers. I simply want to say that it doesn't matter what you shoot them with, what matters is putting a bullet through through something vital. A .308 will kill every hog you will ever see. Your job is to learn how to shoot it well enough to hit a hog in the head at 200yds. And, if you want a kimber, go get it, thats why you live in America. Kimbers are fine rifles, but I can build you two stainless synthetic rem model 7's .308's for the price of one scoped kimber. Thats all personal prefrence, go with what is attractive to you.
 

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shb,

I'm very suprised about the use of a 223 (especially with varmint bullets) on hogs. :eek: I would have thought that the bullet would have exploded upon impact and thus not penetrating at all. :cry:

Tell us a little more about that shot. Distance, angle, size of hog, etc.

Thanks,
Zachary
 

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coyote rifle hog

You won't believe me when I tell you I took that rifle hog hunting on purpose. It is a stainless synthetic Remington Model 7, which I bedded and free floated. It shoots consistent 3/4 inch groups with those Bulk BTHP cartridges from Cabela's. Its main purpose is to shoot coyotes.

I took it hog hunting because it is a light and handy joy to pack around, and I know that I have the skill to put a bullet right between the back of a hogs eye and the base of its ear all the way out to 150 yds. Right now I'm taking a full load of night classes to make up for my misspent youth, and I found myself pennyless when it came time to go hog hunting. My two friends were counting on me because I had made the contacts in TX, and knew all the people, and how to get around in that area. So my best friend loaned me enough money to go. It would have taken 40.00 dollars or so to buy ammo for my .308, and I was just too cheap, so I took my coyote rifle that was already sighted in and ready to go.



I was worried that my decision might cost me an opportunity if the type of close range shot I needed wasn't presented,but I was confident in my ability to get the shot I wanted.

It did cost me one hog. The first two nights of hunting my buddies had five hogs on the ground, out of about two dozen that came out in front of them. I ran a video camera the first evening when the hogs were still calm enough to come out just before the sun set, so I didn't hunt until the second night. That night I had 3 very nervous young boars come out and I didn't want to chance hitting them with the spotlight, they were very jumpy. I tried to use my laser to get a reflection glare off of one of their eyeballs, but the second they saw the red dot bouncing around near them they all sprinted off into the brush. Well then I was pretty discouraged. I sat quietly and waited, hoping they would come back out. It took about a half an hour but they finally came out again. This time I waited until I could clearly distinguish one of their heads while he was feeding broadside and tried to shoot him in the base of the ear but I missed! In the moonlight it was hard to place my black crosshairs on the black pigs head, it was easy to see them right behind his shoulder though. If I had been using my .308 I could have made the shot easily.

Nice short concise answer huh. The last night we had to hunt I got another opportunity. With 2 hours left in the hunt I had another group of pigs step out and start feeding on the corn I had scattered at about 40 yds from my stand. I had my head laying on the window half sleeping and half listening when I noticed them. As I sat upright in the darkened blind the lead hog snorted and crashed off through the swamp. I was really low at this point because I figured I just blew my last chance. But somehow as he was running off, two more stepped out and started feeding. No more screwing around. I eased my rifle into position, got the hogs lined up in the scope, and hit the red spotlight. There were two hogs munching corn in the center of my spotlight beam. The one in the back started moveing off so I put the crosshairs on the other. Crosshairs, earhole, eyeball, BOOM it all happened so fast, the next thing I new, there was a hog laying there on the ground. I watched him for a few minutes to make sure he was down for good. He never wiggled. We guessed his live weight at 120lbs. The entrance wound was centered exactly between the back of the eye and the base of the ear, and about an inch lower than I would have liked, but it worked. The last 5 hogs I've shot have been with this rifle, its nickname is sweet pea , It is so easy to carry and shoot. I just gamble on my ability to get a clean head shot.
I promise to learn how to answer a question more directly in the future.
 
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