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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok Im perplexed. Is there a huge difference between shooting a hand loaded 30-06 with 200-220 grain bullets compared with similar grain bullets in the 338-06? This wildcat really interests me, but Im stuck on how it could be that much better unless you go up to 250 grain bullets.
Anyone?
 

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I dont mean to be a smartass, but it shoots a bigger diameter bullet. It depends on what you use it for, but for elk class animals, i think there is a significant difference. It also shoot the same weight bullets faster than the 30 caliber, although not significantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That part is understandable. I'm basically trying to determine whether its worth the expense to modify an existing 30-06 since I dont want the full recoil of a 338 mag but would like more 'impact' when Moose hunting in a Grizzly area. I also shoot a 7mm but feel under gunned in this regard. I'm open for some options here. :roll:
 

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The 225/230 Grain bullet in the .338-06 at 2,600 fps is just a little slower than the 180 grain .308 bullet in the 30-06. It makes a bigger hole and hits harder. The 250 grain .338 bullet in the .338-06 gets approximately the same velocity as the 220 grainer in the .30-06. Bigger heavier bullets are the advantage of the .338-06. People who use the .338-06 really rave about its effectiveness and consider it better than the '06 for heavier game. It probably is.
 

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I would think the 338-06 would have an advantage over the 30/06 on big moose and bear, if those aren't in your plans, I would be content with 30 cal. The 30/06 will handle deer, sheep, goats, smallish moose, caribou and black bear just fine and do it with a bit flatter trajectory. Going after the bruisers though, the 338 cal is very nice to have.

Just my warped way of thinking. However, if the 338/06 is under your skin, you'll never be satisfied until you try it. I've got the 318 Westley Richards under my skin, it pretty much duplicates 338/06 performance and I already have a 338 Win Mag that I love. It's an itch that I have resolved to scratch though.
 

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In his book, "Hunt Elk" Jim Zumbo claims that the .30-06 is his favorite rifle for elk. He acknowledges that there are many more that hit harder and will doi so at longer ranges but he maintains that the 06 is plenty good enough for elk. Aditionally, the 06 is an extremely popular caliber out west and has, alomng with the .270, probably accounted for more elf than all the magnums combined. Having said all that, I toyed with the idea of rebarreling my Sako 75 in .30-06 to .338-06 but just couldn't get past the idea that, for all the expense required, I wouldn't be gaining all that much bottom line effectiveness...but that's just me So, what do I do to "save money?" I launch a project to build up a Mauser M48 into a .358 Winchester! It'll shoot the heavier bullets, make big holes, and won't tempt me to shoot farther than my skills. Heck, just do what feels right and have fun!
 

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Lagavulin said:
Thanks for the info!

Now I just have to find someone in BC Canada to rebarrel for me.

You could probably arrange any rebarreling thru Italian Sporting goods, in Vancouver. There is also a gunsmith named Bill Crosby, that could be reached thru the Vancouver Gun Club, that might be able help.

I had thought about the .35 Whelen as a possible wildcat, for a 30-06 conversion, but since have read nothing but praise of the .338-06 and I think I would opt for that instead of the Whelen.. Good luck!
 

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In my own limited experience the .338-06 is great. My father had one built on an mauser action about 20 years ago. I used it this past deer season and took two whitetails with it. The bullet used was a hornady 200 gr flatpoint, which I believed was actually designed for the 33 winchester. By taking the 33 winchester bullets and driving them at .338-06 velocities you get rapid expansion (without sacrificing penetration). The end result is that the deer just fall over dead.
 

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Yukon Jack..What do you mean by "smallish moose".A calf??? I have never really seen a smallish moose and all the ones I have shot had no problem buckling and falling over from my 30/06.I guess they must have been smallish.
 

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Smallish moose, kind of an oxymoron, isn't it? By smallish I meant something like a spike or forkhorn. Most places I hunt up here have the "spike, fork or 50" regulation. You can shoot a spike bull, forkhorn or anything with a greater than 50" inside spread. Included also are the moose with 3 or more brow tines.

While a spike or forkhorn moose is still a fair sized animal, after they get over 50", they are just downright huge!! I guess smallish is a relative term for moose. :D

I didn't mean to imply the 30/06 won't kill a huge moose, it will, I've seen it happen. I'd guess more moose have fallen to the 30/06 than all the magnums put together, but I still prefer something will a little bigger diameter and proper bullet construction for something in the 1500 lb range, especially when it stands over 6 feet at the shoulder. That's just me, many like the '06 for big moose just fine and it does a great job. I like my 338 Win Mag, though.
 

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Moose is a draw in most areas in alberta.Ihave taken a few nice ones over the years .My father swears by his .338 and I saw one taken by my great uncles .358 Norma in 1983 that was literally blown off his feet.It was spectacular to see ..Just need to find a way to bring a .338 into the house and convince my wife i had it for years before we got married;-)
 

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We shot 2 moose in Ontario in the mid 70's. A cow and a calf. Both were shot in an old burn and with a 30-06 using 180 grain Nosler partitions. We recovered 1 bullet of 4. All traversing right rear to left front of both beasts. A bull would have been just as dead.. as any of the shots would have reached the heart/lung area. The range was under a hundred yards though..
 

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338/06 vs 30-06

OK, let's really stoke this up. If you were referencing a 7 MM Mag in your opening line, I would rather shoot the 7 RM over either the 338/06 or 30-06. The 7 RM has the horsepower to get it done without the recoil of the 338 WM. There is plenty of documentaiton to show a 7 RM will out penetrate a 30-06 and likely the 338/06 for variety of reasons. I shoot a 175 partition out of my Ruger No. 1 at 2950 fps which is serious medicine for moose, elk etc. Every elk shot in the group was with a 7 RM with complete penetration and they all didn't go far. The 7 RM gets a bad rap from lots of folks who try to shoot lighter bullets on large animals. The 160 or 175 partition will drop any elk or moose cleanly and generally the 7RM is known for accuracy. Let the fun begin......
 

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Well considering that the 6.5x55 (which is almost identical to the .260) with those long 140 grain bullets have accounted for hundreds of moose in the Scandinavian countries, who's to say that the 7mm Rem Mag with the 175 grain bullets couldn't do a better job? As such, although I believe that the 30-06 and .338 are excellent choices for moose, no one can say that they are necessarily better than the 7mm Rem mag.

Zachary
 

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Why is it that I never hear anyone say that a 45-70 is a good moose gun? Looks like to me that a gun which dropped American bison would be just as effective on moose or elk. I think we may have given up some of our skills as hunter/stalkers and rely on long range weapons. I don't know. I'm just setting here watching a beautiful sun set thinking about things. It seems that we are all consumed by the idea of killing the biggest, longest, heaviest what ever. I think the boys at the advertisement agencies have feed us a line and we took it hook, line, rod, reel, and boat. You can't just go fishing or hunting any more. You have to have this boat that line or an ATV. A 30-06 is not enough gun anymore. An old side by side shotgun isn't good enough. Nope, Park Av. says you need a two to three thousand dollar shotgun. You got to look good in the field. The gun has to look good. You can't shoot clays with a field gun, it has to be open choked and ported which makes it useless to hunt birds. We don't have the skills to stalk to with in a hundred or two hundred yards to get within range of our .270, 250 savage, or 30-06. We can stand in one county and shoot a target in the next with our supper intercontinental plasma death ray weapon. I think we miss a lot when we depend on these trappings rather than out skills as a hunter/ stalker. In the hands of a hunter, a 30-06 is enough gun to kill anything in North America. Likewise, a cane pole with good Eagle Claw hooks and can of worms will catch you all the fish you can eat.

Before you get the wrong idea, I fell for the advertisement line. I have the "right" boots, vest, hunting pants, shotguns and knives. I never fell for the magnum line in either shotguns or rifles. The 30-06 is my heavy rifle and 2 3/4" 12ga. my heaviest load and I get by. Well it was a pretty sunset. :D OO
 

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I own a .30-06 and a .338-06 and use both. I use the .338-06 for elk and moose when I can draw a tag. Both my rifles are custom stocked pre-64 M70 Winchesters. The .338-06 is an '06 rebored to .338 caliber with no other changes. I shoot 210 Nosler Partitions at a chronographed 2805 fps from the .338-06. Other than the recoil and obvious muzzle energy difference there isn't much. Trajectory is pretty close to being the same as a 180 .30 caliber Nosler Partiton out of the .30-06. I get excellent penetration and shoot through most of my elk and the moose in my avatar. I'm holding the .338-06 in the picture. I have nothing but good to say about the .338-06! :wink:
 
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