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Wow, from the attention that the .35 Whelen gets on these message boards you'd think it was right up there with .30-06, .308, and .30-30 popularity! That's good. Maybe companies will invest in more bullet selection and powder testing.

Anyway. . . I've got a load for my Whelen using Remington 200 gr RNs over 60.5 grains of RL-15 that's rolling along at 2750 fps.

My question is: Will this bullet hold together at this velocity for Wisconsin Whitetails? They run about 120 to 180 lbs dressed out.

Or are the pointy bullets better for this purpose/velocity?
 

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I recently bought a .35 Whelen Mauser action. It is a very light kicker with Federal 225 gr. Vital-Shoks. I have some 200 gr. Remington's to try out. The Rem's are mildly loaded according to the Shooters Bible, but should be good enough for whitetails. The Federal packaging says they are good for elk, moose, and brown bear. The Federal package says it has 2030 ft-lbs of energy at 300 yards with a 24" barrel. I have a 22" barrel. This is an awesome caliber for a non-magnum. I am now reading up on reloading and will be buying some equipment soon. Hopefully a Christmas present. Wish it were more popular, especially if Hornady would used their light magnum powder in them.
 

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I have a Ruger M77 MkII chambered in .35 Whelen. I use factory Remington Core Lokt 250 grain bullets. I have shot quite a few whitetails with it and it absolutely hammers them. The .35 Whelen is great for anything in North America in my opinion.


Spanky
 

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I have used the 200 grain RNCL in my 358 on three deer. I think I am getting a bit more than 2500 fps. They were all under 70 yards out and they all went down quickly with the bullets holding together and exiting, one of which penetrated 20 inches of deer before exiting. I am loading this bullet to 2650 fps out of my Whelen and plan to test this load out on some feral hogs this year or early next year. I am also loading the 250 grain Hornady round nose to 2500 fps and will also test this load out, hopefully on a hogzilla.
 

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I have a 7600 in 35 Whelen and I use the 200 grain Hornady with IMR 4320 pushing it gets 1.25 inch groups with the 250 grain Hornady using IMR 4320 for under inch groups. This is one great round that deserves more use and press
 

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"Pointy bullets" are better for long range shots due to their B.C. As for putting the THUMP on something, many say round noses are the way to go.

Jim
 

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Depending on range, under 200 yards the round nose 200gr bullet will be devastating on a whitetail. Even if you make a bad shot, the shock and the big hole out will take it down pretty fast. Big holes leak a lot of blood. If the range is going to be over 200 yards I would use a Spire point or spitzer type bullet. Either load is adequate for Elk so a whitetail should be no problem. Go on up to the 225 or 250 gr bullet and you are set for Moose.

I carry a .35 Whelen handi rifle, and my wife carries a custom Mauser in .35 Whelen here in Alaska. They have accounted for more than a few Moose, and some Black Bears, with one Grizzly thrown in for good measure. All one shot kills.
 

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Black Jaque, yes that bullet will be good on deer, and if you plan on shots greater than 200 yds then use a pointed bullet, JimP. ;D
 

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Fooling around with different powders I loaded up 58.0 grains of AA4350 and the 250 grain Hornady RN. I suppose velocity is under 2400 fps but accuracy was really good. Don't see why this load won't do the job for hunting feral hogs in the dark.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Well, I got the chance to field test these RNs on whitetail. Shot 2 deer, both inside 100 yards. Bullet held together and exited both times. Good damage - not excessive either.
 

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I took a doe 3 years ago with a 200 gr Hornady. Doe was coming right to me and I hit it in the breastbone. The bullet pretty much exploded - deer didn't go far. I think most of the 200's out there are designed for 35 Remington velocities - you'd be better off with a 225 or 250.
 

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I second daven270win above.

When I started using my 35 Whelen back in the 1960s about the only 35 cal bullets available for reloading were 200 gr. and most were constructed for 35 Rem velocities. When the 350 Rem Mag came out 250 gr. bullets became widely available for reloading.

First 3 deer I shot with the 35 Whelen were loaded with 200 gr bullets and in each case the bullet "exploded" in the animal.

I switched to 250 gr Speer spitzer and never looked back. It takes White Tails, Mule Deer, Elk, and Bear equally with excellent wound channels and exit holes.

I just see no use for a 200 gr bullet in the 35 Whelen

Barstooler
 

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I can't say I'd use the 35 Whelen on Brown bears unless I had to. For moose though any 250 grain bullet would be a good choice, the Speer being what I would load.
 

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I was thinking about the 310 gr Woodleigh bullet that Double Tap ammo sells. You can also order the bullets and reload yourself. I have never hunted Alaska, but it would seem to me anything good enough for moose, should be good enough for brown or grizzly bears. At least at under 200-250 yards. Would I be ok with this?
 

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I have a Rebored Winchester '95 in 35 Whelen. It has accounted for 2 Wis whitetails, both shot at a distance of about 50yds. Bullet: 250 gr Speer, Velocity: 2399fps. 1 went down where it stood the other went about 30 yds. I also have a Remington 673 Chambered in the Whelen equivalent, the 350 Rem Mag. I've used this rifle the last 4 years exclusively in Wisconsin. It has accounted for 3 deer and 1 Black Bear. Bullet 220gr. Speer flat point, Velocity 2450fps. All deer, more or less went down in there tracks give or take a few yards, the bear went, maybe 20 yds. I like the 220 or for that matter 225gr bullets for deer. The 220 is a flat point and yes you can argue about down range trajectory versus spitzers but to the ranges I shoot in WI, 200yds is a long shot. A few inches in drop is miniscule and not noticed in the hunting fields as opposed to armchair ballistical calculating. If I were to subscribed to the latter ,I'd be using a .30 caliber sumpthinorother and not having any fun at all. CRASH87
 

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I feel strongly that the 250gr best describes the Whelen in the majority of cases. Although the 225gr is, in all likelihood, the most commonly used bullet weight when it comes to handloading.

In my Whelen, I have come to prefer the Lyman 358009, 282gr GC hard cast from W/W, at a very modest 2050fps. My rifle has a 1:12 twist in a 26.5" Douglas #3 bbl, and of all the guns I now own and have owned over the years, this particular rifle / caliber combination is my favorite... by far.

No matter what your choice of bullet weight, with 200gr and over, the Whelen seems to be able to get the job done, and done right.

Russ...
 
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