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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone have any experience with the .284 Winchester case necked up to .375? Bought one recently, haven't gotten around to making some brass and trying to do a few loads.
 

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Wow! I read about one of those, but it had to be over 25yrs ago! I imagine it would be very similar to the 375/06 (375 Whelen). If you had Quikloads or know someone who does, you could input all your dimensions data and get a "guideline". Somebody, somewhere has 375 Whelen data posted. it would be close when comparing lighter bullets. I doubt you would ever need to go heavier than a 250/260gr in that shorter case. have a ball
 

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The real challenge will be finding 284 brass! I'm sure there is some somewhere, you would just have to look, but I haven't seen any in years. Of course, you could neck up 6.5/284 Norma brass, but it would have to be done very delicately and in several steps (along with annealing) in order not to collapse that shoulder. Good luck to you
 

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The brass thing is one thing I am worried about. I was planning on necking up to .30 and then trying to blow it out by fireforming with Trail Boss
 

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Well, you could actually fire 6.5/284 factory ammo to fireform! The bullet won't touch the bore, and it would have the added benefit of keeping the case mouth "square" from the pressure of firing the bullet. I once fireformed some 280 Remington brass ( the awful nickle plated stuff) in a 338/280 wildcat. I used pistol powder and tamped cottonballs. Many of the case mouths were very uneven, requiring a lot of trimming. For one side to flow out longer than the other meant my case necks were very thin on that side. I gave up and had it convereted to 338 winmag right after. I'm sure there better ways. One thing you may consider is the "hydraulic forming die". It uses water, costs about $150 bucks, but would work better IMO. ( Whiddon makes it. Also, I think Hornady can make you one, but no idea of cost) I saw new (well, yrs old) 284 brass on gunbroker for $120-175 for 100. it may be the simplest way after all, ha. Might check it out.
 

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I rebarreled a Marlin 336 for 375/284. Because it is a lever I used reformed 45-70 cases. I turned the rim to 356 Win. size and cut an extractor groove. I have a 17 inch barrel with a muzzle brake. I use Horn. 220gr. flat nose bullets with 55gr. MR223. I get 2450fps and 1/2 inch groups at 100 yards.
 

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Seems like a solution without a problem. Lot of work just to have something different, that few people might ever want.
 

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Haven't heard anyone talking about the .284 Win in a long time! I can remember way back when it was all the rage - people were necking it up, necking it down, rebarreling bolt actions for it, you name it they were doing it. Every gun magazine had articles on it. It was the best thing since sliced bread!

Everytime something new comes out we're told it's going to revolutionize the shooting world - and then something newer comes out! Some things never change.

It's a good cartridge, but like some other good cartridges it's popularity waned. You could do a lot worse than a wildcat based on the .284 case - if you're willing to put up with trying to find brass.
 

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I imagine that after over 2 years the OP has found his brass....Midway has it on clearance right now. Did he ever load and shoot the rifle? Enquiring minds want to know...


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Why not a .375/350 Remington? That's a .350 Remington necked up to .375". The great advantage is being able to die form brass out of any belted magnum case and not have to do a lot of gymnastics with scarce, hard to find .284 Win.

I like the idea of the .375/350 Rem, but have no need for one. Just a suggestion.
 
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