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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I finally got to the range today to shoot my new alaskan for the first time.

I noticed that the rearward recoil was about like a 338WM but the upward recoil was viscous.
The rifle flew out of my left hand everytime.
I thought maybe it was levering off my shoulder so the last shot I let it free recoil. It jumped a foot off the table and unfortunately smacked the table on the way down.

Im new to big bores and was just wondering if this is normal? is it in the way the stock is made?
I really wanted to shoot it off the stick but was scared it would hit the ground on its trip back from Mars.
 

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i think you may find it to be the stock. i owned a savage in 243 30 years ago. 243 dosen't kick much but this thing would come up high. couldn't keep the target in the scope, and it was a brand new gun. i have a browning A Bolt in 375h&h and it kicks, but the recoil comes straight back, never lose the target in the scope.
 

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I've put a couple Hornady factory rounds through a Ruger Alaskan and found it to be surprisingly mild mannered - much more so than my .45-70 "Rhino Blaster" handloads or my 12 guage factory turkey loads or slugs.
 

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I suspect the serious muzzle rise that you describe likely has to do with the stock design along with how it fits you. It may be how you had the rifle supported at the bench. I also believe the most felt recoil you will ever experience shooting a rifle will likely be shooting off a bench.

All things being equal when you go to the bigger bores you do experience more recoil, however the .375 isn't known for sharp recoil or sending the muzzle to the sky on each shot. For the level of performance offered by a .375 it tends to push rather than smack you, and is rather comfortable to shoot. I used to teach bear / rifle safety in Alaska. Put literally 100's of folks of all sizes and experience levels thru the training, which included some amount of live fire and speed / accuracy qualifications. We used Winchester Model 70's, Remington 700's and a few Interarms. I don't recall any of the students having problems with muzzle rise. Big difference here is none of the shooting was off a bench.

Suggest you find a range where you can shoot your rifle bagged, but in the standing up position. If that doesn't help, find a friend with a .375 and see if their rifle gives you the same recoil problem.

Good luck.

Silvertp
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Shooting the gun gave me a very different experience from what I expected. I was comfortable enough with the rearward recoil to lightly hold the gun and let it free recoil. I loaded some cold blooded 260 grain loads and Ill see if that helps with the muzzle jump. Ill hopefully get a chance to try the factory loads standing or at least sitting straight up.

Im used to having the crap beat out of me patterning turkey loads in the spring. The shotgun doesnt rise.

I read about the ruger frontier with 16 inch barrel having nasty muzzle jump. That makes me wonder if the short barrel has anything to do with it.

I will certainly find out what the deal is. ;D
 

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Mag-Na-Porting will help alot I think...I've had it done on number of rifles and it does help with muzzle rise. Some folks don't like it....I do. I have it on my Rem 700 BDLSS in .375HH and it really does help. Just my 2 cents.
 

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I've had rifles jump when fired but these rifles have 75lb of recoil. I'd say you aren't holding it right or you don't have enought protection and you know it coming and you jerk the rifle.
 

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I'm all for porting.
When I had it done on mine ,Magna Porting was the only one available to me. I didn't even fire the Ruger#1 I had until the porting was done.
 

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I'm not a fan of muzzle brakes but can say that some of them definitely will REDIRECT the recoil impluse if that's what ya want. They don't reduce recoil in spite of claims to the contrary but merely change the vectar of the recoil.

I once had a .358 JDJ in a 14" Contender barrel. It pushed a 225 at 2300 fps and when I fired it from a bag rest that thing would rise 12" to 15" off the bag and twist violently at times almost coming out of my hand if using a one hand hold.

I had SSK Industries put one of the Arrestor brakes on and after that it had absolutely ZERO lift or twist even when fired one handed. Of course that mean 100% of the recoil came back into my hand and sadly my hand just couldn't deal with that either so I had to let it go. But if you want that rifle to stop coming off the bag and to stop lifing completely the SSK Industries Arrestor brake can sure make that happen. Just make sure you are ready for ALL of it to hit your shoulder cuz it will.
 

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I had a Sako .375 years back that did that to me. Lousy stock design was the problem there, although looking at the Ruger, the overall design looks good to me. If you have friends who are experienced with big bores, take them to the range with you and have them watch you shoot. Could be your technique.
 

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You have to hold on to it. I let my hunting partner shoot my 458 Lott and when he fired it leaning against a tree that rifle jumped about 2 feet up. It didn't hit the ground because
he held on to it. He did want to shoot anymore. I said to him you have to hold to that rifle while you shoot it.
 

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Castman, I would advise against you having the .375 Ruger fitted with a muzzle break. Those muzzle breaks in my eyes just take away the style and lines of a fine hunting rifle. Some look like they have a tin can sitting on the end of the barrel. I had the same problem you are experiencing some 35 years ago and fixed the muzzle jump sessions, by way of sending the barreled action to Kelly at Mag-NA-Port.

Now after receiving the barreled action back from Kelly & Co. I slapped the stock back on the rifle and proceeded to my backyard range. I was amazed at the results and it certainly did improve my shooting ability with my .375-H&H in a Remington rifle. The porting on the end of the barrel was hardly noticeable unless you knew it was there and it did not take away the looks of the rifle by any means. It took all but about 3.5 inches of jump out of the gun and also lightened the recoil by about 10 pounds. This put it in the same class as my .300 Win mag shooting 200 grain bullets.

I now have a .475 magnum that is Mag-NA-Ported also and it sure makes the rifle a lot more shooter friendly and being able to get that second shot off in a hurry, not having to deal with 18 inches of muzzle jump anymore.
 

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I would suggest you try shooting it again and trying a different technique maybe. I also have a 375 Ruger alaskan, it has tremendous rearward push to it but I have not noticed a severe muzzle jump, I hold on nice and tight though.
 

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I have a rifle that will jump. It doesn't jump when I shoot it. But a friend wanted to shoot it. He leaned against a tree and when he fired the rifle that rifle jumped out of his hold but it didn't hit the ground. I would guess that if I don't have any problem that I have a stronger hold.
The rifle I'm talking about is my 458 Lott.
 

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also a guy has to keep in mind that if your shooting a gun bigger then a 300 mag there is going to be some serious recoil. Its the main reason you seem so many big magnums on the used gun rack. People must buy them thinking if they can shoot a 243 they can shoot anything. Ill tell you how to cure it. Find someone with a 378 or 460 weatherby and shoot about a 50 rounds out of one from the bench and then shoot your 375. Youll think you just found another 243!!!
 
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