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1Glock: I would opt for the snubbie in 38 caliber. It is true that you can find a 357 snubbie for every 38 snubbie out there but what you pay for ($ wise) and what it costs you in terms of recoil, muzzle blast, wrist wrenching and lost follow-up time may not make it worth the extra bark (and little extra bite) of the 357 over the 38.

You indicated that you wanted it for a field gun. There are some fellers on this forum who even hunt hogs and whitetail with 38s, and not with plus P loads either. Not my choice but it shows the possible capability of the 38 spl. I prefer a 200 grain cast SWC in my 38s (and 357s) at factory speeds and am comfortable (that is, confident in the ability of the revolver and cartridge/bullet combination to do what it is supposed to do) with carrying the 38 snubbie loaded as such for personal defense. For field work I will take the 357 in a heavier revolver.

If you feel the need, you can hot rod the 38 spl for better performance and in today's modern snubbies rated for plus P cartridges you would have a place to start at with the 38 and if you so choose, then upgrade to the 357.

Please don't get me wrong, I like the 357 magnum cartridge - as long as I can shoot the load I want in the revolver I want to shoot it in. My preference here is for a medium to heavy frame revolver with at least a 3.5-4" bbl. My personal 357 is a S&W Model 27/28 with a 3.5 inch bbl (woulda gotten the 3.75" bbl but they were all out of them). If I could add another 357 to my list, it would be a 4" Model 19 - nice medium frame, fairly lightweight and able to handle heavy cast bullets.

I have fired a few 357 snubbies and find the blast and recoil to be unpleasant in the newer lightweight snubbies. I once had a ball with a 2" Model 19 using the old Skeeter Skelton loads as that revolver was heavy enough to handle the load and the recoil but I wouldn't want to be on the recoil end of things with some of the newer titanium or scandium guns with those loads.

I would start with the 38 first. Just my 2 cents worth. This be Mikey.
 

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Should I buy a 357 mag snubbie??

I think Mikeys advice is sound and I have to agree for the most part. I have only one .357 in my safe and its a Colt trooper, 4" with vent rib. I enjoy shooting it with magnum loads but when I used it for a home defense gun (bedside) I loaded it with .38 spl. +P+ hydroshocks. It is much easier control for fast accurate follow up shots. This load also allowed for my wife to handle it comfortably. I'm not sure if I have fired a snuuby .357 although I know my brother used to have one. I would not look forward to the recoil even though my revolver of choice is a .44mag.

Having said that, I still might suggest the .357 for your because you can always start out with the .38 loads and work your way up if you feel you need more juice. You can carry .357 loads while hunting and .38s (as potent as you like) for defense. On the other hand,if you buy the .38, your stuck with the limited potential of the .38 loads.

Thats my quarters worth.........
 

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Should I buy a 357 mag snubbie??

:D Hey sup?...well I just put a .357 snubbie on lay-away.It is a taurus,and I only paid like 268 for it.I hear they are good guns,and for the price I couldn't pass it up.I think it would be a sound choice for you....I mean if the .357 load is too hot you can always use .38's...,but if u like the .357 or feel a need for it u got it.I am sure a .38 would be fine,but I guess I like the idea of having the option of more power if Iwant it.I guess it comes down to what u can find,how it fits you and how comfortable it is for you....

just my dime worth of info

Good luck!


Lates,
Shawn Mc.
 

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Snub questions?

1Glock, I'm gonna stick my neck out here and answer a little differently. I own both calibers in both short and long barrels and in small, medium, and large frames. Most everything involves some compromise, but if the most important thing to you is not absolute "hideability", especially in the woods, I'm gonna tell you that the best choice for you as a backup hunting gun in these calibers is a 4" framed .357 mag. It is no more trouble to be comfortable with a 4 incher than a 2, if you are using a good belt holster. It is not the barrel length that gives trouble (unless you get longer than 4"). It is the grip or butt size that really sticks out.

Now that they are making medium frame revolvers with a round butt, they are really easily carried, even concealed. I have a friend who recently bought a Taurus Tracker in .357, and I am mightily impressed with it, except for the porting in the barrel. Shoots really well, but I don't like ports. I am a Smith man, but I am very positively impressed with the new Taurus revolvers, without having used them extensively. You can obviously have the choice of 38s or mags, and the benefit of the extra weight and longer barrel make this choice much smarter for even limited hunting or hunting backup, IMO.

Of course, they are making some titanium and other alloy light frame mags these days, but they are not fun to shoot, and I am not sensitive. The regular 4 incher makes an excellent house gun, especially for a wife who will be able to easily understand and operate it, as opposed to the semi-auto. It also makes an excellent car gun, and you can make meat with the 38s in the woods (rabbits, squirrels, grouse, etc) or load up for more serious stuff. A cylinder full of more than one type of ammo is easily carried and used in the field. If you reload, there are many options for loads and loadings.

I have lots more reasons, but I have already written a book. You need to get something you like and will shoot, of course, but it takes a really dedicated shooter to do precision work with a fixed sighted snubbie. If you are close enough to stick the front sight in past the ribs, and give the weapon a quarter turn to the right to lock it in place, and then fire away, you can do some serious damage. If the distance is beyond 15 or 20 feet, that longer barrel and some decent adjustable sights become very important. I understand that you already have your regular "carry" gun in your Glock. That lets you have the option of picking a weapon to be a backup while hunting that makes more sense for that kind of use and is still a decent choice for defensive or other purposes, as well as being much more pleasant to shoot.

It is the regular disciplined shooting of any firearm, particularly handguns, that make them effective at all. Otherwise, a good smooth rock is easier to throw accurately!! So now you can take my opinion and a buck and buy a cuppa coffee at most cafes!!!!
 

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Should I buy a 357 mag snubbie??

I DONT THINK THAT YOU WOULD BE SORRY GETTING THE .357. I PERSONALLY HAVE TWO .357'S. ONE OF THEM HAPPENS TO BE A 2" D FRAME COLT. WHILE SHOOTING THE COLT WITH MAGNUM LOADS THERE IS QUITE A BIT OF RECOIL ESPECIALLY WHILE FIREING ONE HANDED. I WOULD SUGGEST PRATICEING WITH .38 SPECIALS, AND LOADING WITH EITHER HOT .38+P'S OR A MID .357 LOAD FOR CARRYING.
 

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Should I buy a 357 mag snubbie??

I have and carry a Ruger SP101 .357 mag. I highly recommend it as being controllable, strong, fairly light and accurate. It's easy to hit coffee cans at 50 yards, rocks out fairly far. I highly recommend it. My two next handgun purchases will be an SP101 in 32 Mag (4") and a Security Six in .357 mag (also 4").

TOm
 
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