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I have the need for a new 45 acp to use for target shootingl

My 1945 gov issue colt is not accurate enough and I do not wish to modify this thing of beauty...so I guess I NEED a new gun.

I do not wish to spend a ton of money but I NEED an accurate gun that will last forever. Adjustable sights, good trigger, 5 inch barrel, and I prefer the traditional colt acp styling.

Please offer your recomendations so that I can research and look....That is almost as much fun as shooting anyway.

Thanks!

Fred a/k/a HappyHunter :D :grin: :)
 

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Subscribe to the Bullsye L-form accessible via www.bullseyepistol.com. Those are the people you need to ask about this. My own experience is that if you're planning to buy new, expect to pay about $1,300 to $2,000 for a gun with optical sights. Some of the names are Les Baer, Clark Custom, and Rock River. Your best bet may be to buy a used gun from another bullseye shooter.

Get a dedicated bullseye gun. Don't get a Kimber or something like that. You'll end up buying a dedicated bullsye gun eventually anyway.

Another option is the Pardini PC45. Muuuch nicer than the 1911 in my opinion. Easier to work on too.
 

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do you handload?

I would suggest trying some handloading if you dont already
you can play with different componants and powders to come up with a combination that will improve your accuracyI can shoot some nice groups with a cheapo 45 acp with good ammo
 

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First thing you need to decide is what kind of Bullseye matches you are going to fire. The first type is Service Pistol. You can have very limited external modifications to the pistol, but you can have a match barrel, match mechanical sights, and a crisp, match trigger set to 4 lbs. It shoots the 230 grain standard or match Ball ammunition (Hardball). The second type is the NRA match .45. It can have a 3.5 lb trigger, adjustable or electronic (red dot) sights, extended front sights, target grips with palm shelf, and is set up for light target loads such as 185 grain bullet w/3.5 grains of Bullseye (softball or Wadcutter). A useful reference for the allowable modifications is the NRA Pistol Rulebook.

Now how do you get there? One, you could buy a match Service Pistol or a NRA Match pistol from Baer, Kimber, or others, and expect to pay 1200-1500 bucks. Another way is to get a Springfield basic 1911 and build it up to match pistol standards over time, as your finances allow. The three basic requirements are a match barrel (Kart and Bar-Sto make good ones), Match sights (Bomar for mechanical, UltraDot for red dot), and a match trigger (Videcki is cost effective). You don't need these all at once. Match trigger first, then sights, finally the match barrel. If you want to do the fitting yourself, get a copy of the Kuhnhausen .45 Shop Manual, and the Hallock's .45 Auto Handbook to see what you are in for.

Another alternative to building and buying one outright is to find some Bullseye shooters. Almost everyone will have a match .45 for sale as they move up to better (more expensive) equipment, in their never ending quest for just a few more points.
 

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Like Bob said, decide what you'll do with it before deciding what to build/buy. You could conceivably get by with just a ball gun and a .22 and still shoot all the NRA stages and DCM Legs. Not optimum, but probably the cheapest way to cover all the bases.

Ball guns are usually for sale immediately after any Leg match from both winners and losers!

Redial
 
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