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First things first. Thank you to those of you who posted all the great info. Some of you really spent some time with your responses and man I really appreciate that. Now the loads. I loaded up some of that clays and really like it. I loaded it at about 800fps pushing a wheel weight cast bullet weighing about 200. Its a old lyman 200 gr swc for the 45 acp. Stubby little sucker but my leading problems are basically gone. I had been trying everything when I was shooting the 255 grain phonix bullets and they just plain leaded despite my best attempts and my gunsmiths work. The bullets will not quite push through my cylinder. One hoe will the other five would not. This did not impress me much with my smiths work either. I loaded 400 rounds and thought I would change nothing until they were gone provided I don't have anymore problems. I think the forcing cone could use some work. I was never really able to get all the lead off of it. But the cylinders that used to look chrome lined after 50 rounds were nearly clean and what was there wiped out easily. The rest of the barrel never did lead so that problem never really existed.
One question to wind all this down. If I was a brave sole and wanted to what are you folks opinion about gluing some fine emery to a dowel the correct size and carefully sanding those other cylinder theoats out to where a bullet would just push thru? This may be to crude but I was thinking my smiths work was not 100% accurate or all holes would be the exact same size. Let me know thoughts you won't hurt my feelings and I really do listen to what other folks think. Success storins and failure would be welcomed. Thanks for all the input. Sharps-Nut
 

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Cylinder throats

There are several tools available from Brownell's for the job. 2 reamer sets: one is .4525" with a set of pilots, which costs $115; the other costs $200 and doesn't say what the size is. There is also the cylinder hone, for $30 or so. Polish the chambers and the throats together. I have done this on several guns and I use a bullet of the appropriate size as a gage. I have opened mine to about .4515." That seems to work well for me. I would be concerned with the dowel with making the cylinder throats less than round. Don't forget the barrel forcing cone. I cut my .45s with an 11 degree cutter. It cleans up what can be a rough forcing cone and makes it concentric with the bore. I have seen them pretty far off.
 

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45 lc loading data and the ruger blackhawk

I always save my worn out brass bristle brushes.
They always have some small amount of bristle left on them for an anchor.
I cut off a chunk of steel wool with some tin snips and shred it slightly so it can catch on the bristles of the worn out brass brush.
Rotate the brush in the same direction as your drill rotates and using light pressure, the wool will wrap around the brush.

Try it in the cylinder and if you need more, just wrap a little more till you achieve a tight fit. Chuck it in the drill and run the brush back and forth in each cylinder.

I start with coarse and use intermediate to finish.
This is really good if .38 special hi-velocity loads have been shot in a .357 cylinder.
It will remove lead and lightly polish the cylinder.
Never use abrasive or sandpaper strips.

I also use a twenty ga shotgun brush for .45 cal guns- and I use a .410 brush for .44 cal.
Use .45 brush for .357
Use .357 for .32
The bigger brush will really dig into the lead if there is any and get it out quick if the forcing cone and barrel are leaded.
 
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