Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,020 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
https://gundigest.com/rifles/8-top-bolt-action-rifles-for-hunting-and-more?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=GD_BuildingAR10&utm_content=GD_BuildingAR10+Version+A+CID_f777819bd998870f0a1c3803d5fe9e88&utm_source=Campaign Monitor&utm_term=Read More

By Luke Hartle -August 27, 2018

For hunting or shooting, these bolt-action rifles are at the top of their game.

The top bolt-action rifles:

Franchi Momentum

Mauser M-18

Bergara B-14 Ridge

Mossberg Patriot Synthetic Cerakote

CZ 557 Left Hand

Savage 110 Storm

Weatherby Vanguard First Lite

Lithgow LA102 CrossOver

Things are getting really complex around here. From precision rifles with micro-adjusting stocks, to a flood of black striker-fired pistol options, to ARs with enough handguard attachment room that it’s quite literally possible to make that gun too heavy to carry — there’s a lot going on in the world of new guns right now.

Don’t break your neck reading too hard between the lines: Each one of those categories has its place, and I enjoy tinkering with all new guns more than most. But with all that happening, the classic bolt-action sporting rifle platform has been all but overlooked. And that’s a shame, because there’s nothing more therapeutic than slow-rolling a buttery bolt and watching a round slide up into a hungry, long-action chamber.

Here’s a nod to those who are not only keeping the sporting bolt-gun heritage alive, but who are making impressive improvements on a platform that was never broken to begin with.


Fanchi Momentum


Known exclusively for its waterfowl, sporting and upland shotguns, Franchi enters 2018 by not just dipping their toes into the sporting bolt-action world, but by going all in with their Italian influenced Momentum. Leading the momentum of the Momentum (sorry, couldn’t help it), is the stock, which combines raised curves and checkering in the hold areas of frequently used shooting positions.

Let me say it like this: Think about where you put your hands to support the rifle while shooting from prone, or kneeling, or sitting — or while shooting offhand. The Momentum features unique grips in each of these locations.

In addition, the tri-lug bolt is spiral fluted for a rock-solid lockup and features a short 60-degree throw. While I appreciate the convenience of a rotary box magazine, Franchi chose to go with the more classic hinged floorplate mag, which I like. During some shooting of the Momentum prototypes, I had suggested that Franchi etch an elegant “F” on the belly of the floorplate to further distinguish the fine Italian craftsmanship within, but I’ve yet to see that come to fruition. Maybe on a Gen 2 model?

I also appreciate that I could still operate the bolt with the two-position safety engaged, and the single-stage trigger is adjustable from 2-4 pounds and is built to impress — especially on a rifle of this price point.

Other features include a TSA recoil pad; and a cold-hammer-forged, chrome-molybdenum, free-floating threaded barrel. The 6.6-pound Momentum has an impressive offering of calibers right out of the gate — .243 Win, 6.5 Creedmoor, .270 Win., .308 Win., .30-06, .300 Win. Mag. — and is available in three configurations: black synthetic, black synthetic combo (with a Burris 3-9x40mm riflescope) and a wood-stocked 150th Anniversary Limited Edition.

MSRP: $609/black synthetic; $729/combo; and $1,069/Anniversary


Mauser M-18


More than 120 years ago, the introduction of the M98 action transformed everything that was known about bolt-action rifle design. While the M-18 Mauser isn’t as monumental as the M98 was in its day, the level of quality Mauser has brought to the budget-friendly sporting rifle category is equally as jaw-dropping.

According to Mauser, the goal of the M-18 is to return the art of rifle building to its original form — pure, no-frills workmanship — by offering a genuine tool for genuine hunters with a sensational price-to-performance ratio.

Features of the M-18 include a three-position safety system that acts directly on the trigger lug, soft grip inlays on the grip and fore-end, a removable double-row five-shot magazine, cold-hammered barrel and an adjustable direct-action trigger.

Unique to the M-18 is what Mauser is calling a “multi-purpose-cap,” which consists of a quickly removable butt pad that opens to allow access to an in-stock storage compartment. As released in early 2018, the rifle is currently available in .308 Win. and .30-06. Come July 2018, .243 Win., .270 Win., 7mm Rem. Mag. and .300 Win. Mag. options will be added to the M-18 family.

MSRP: $699.99



Bergara B-14 Ridge


If you’re seriously shopping for a bolt-action sporting rifle and have yet to look under the hood of a Bergara, your search simply is not complete. New for 2018, the B-14 Ridge features a molded synthetic, glass-fiber reinforced polymer stock, which adds as much strength to the rifle as is does beauty. A SoftTouch coating is then applied to create a soft yet tacky feel for exceptional grip. The Bergara 4140 CrMo steel barrel is finished in matte blue and available in a 22-inch (7.9 pounds) and 24-inch (8.1 pounds) configurations. B-14 Ridge stocks are bedded with integral pillars for stability and enhanced accuracy, and the barrel is threaded to accept muzzle brakes or suppressors.

And, of course, what would a Bergara rifle be without mentioning the Spanish Bergara barrel around which this rifle is built? The action is Bergara’s own B-14 Action, featuring a two-lug bolt with a sliding plate extractor and a “coned” bolt nose and breech to create ultra-smooth feeding and extraction. The Bergara curved trigger comes set at near 3 pounds, and the action is drilled and tapped to fit Remington 700 style rings and bases.

The B-14 Ridge is available in: .22-250 Rem., .243 Win., .270 Win., 6.5 Creedmoor, .30-06, .308 Win., .300 Win. Mag. and 7mm Rem. Mag.

MSRP: $865



Mossberg Patriot Synthetic Cerakote


It’s been a handful of years since Mossberg first unveiled the Patriot, and the family of Patriot rifles has continued to grow each year since. To date, Patriot models include: Hunting, Vortex-scoped combos, Night Train, Youth, Predator and Revere — with stocks available in walnut, laminate or synthetic. For 2018, Mossberg added a Synthetic Cerakote option to the lineup.

The entire Patriot line is best known for Mossberg’s LBA (Lightning Bolt Action) Adjustable Trigger, which is adjustable from 2 to 7 pounds and designed to eliminate creep. The Patriot’s button-rifled fluted barrels are free-floated and have a recessed crown, and the spiral-fluted bolt features an ergonomic bolt angle and knurled bolt handle for quick cycling of the action. It’s a sweet-looking rifle.

Currently, the Synthetic Cerakote Patriot is available in .243 Win., though I expect that list of options to grow in the near future. The barrel is fluted — as is the bolt — and the rifle itself weighs 6.6 pounds, which is right in the mix of other rifles in this class.

MSRP: $440


CZ 557 Left Hand


Options for southpaws who demand a high-quality bolt-action rifle have historically been slim at best — and that’s not even bringing cost into the equation. Southpaws: Are you ready to have your cake and eat it, too?

The CZ 557 Left-Hand is built on the same sweet push-fed action as the standard 557 — except with the bolt handle now located on the wrong … er, left side. The Left-Hand model sports what CZ is calling an “American-pattern” stock of the 557 Sporter, but it also wears a 24-inch barrel to maximize the performance of the .30-06 and .308 Win. chamberings. Other features include a hinged floorplate magazine, a fully adjustable trigger, two-position safety, a 4-round capacity and stunning Turkish walnut stock. And for “normal” shooters out there, the CZ 557 is available in a large variety of models and chamberings to scratch any itch.

MSRP: $865


Savage 110 Storm


For rifle shooters, the Savage 110 is as much a household name as Remington 870 is for shotgunners. The 110 has seen its share of innovation in its 60-year reign, but 2018 perhaps marks the biggest advancements that the 110 has ever experienced.

New for 2018 is the Savage 110 Storm, which features all the tried-and-true guts of the Model 110 action, but with a completely different body centering around the AccuStock. The Savage AccuStock consists of a rigid rail system embedded in the stock that extends through the fore-end of the rifle, engaging the action three-dimensionally along its entire length. But here’s the tangible part: The AccuStock also features five comb risers and four length-of-pull inserts that are included to provide the perfect fit — and it’s all easily interchangeable and locked down by the buttplate screws.

And, with 17 chamberings available, finding a Model 110 Storm to “fit” your needs should be quite simple.

MSRP: $849


Weatherby Vanguard First Lite


Since its first launch, the Weatherby Vanguard line has grown faster than a herd of backyard rabbits, with each generation a bit more innovative than the last. For 2018, Weatherby is offering the Vanguard in a First Lite edition.

Like all Vanguards, the First Lite edition boasts a match-quality two-stage trigger and a sub-MOA accuracy guarantee. Other features include a fluted, one-piece machined bolt body; Vanguard recoil pad; three-position safety; cold-hammer-forged barrel; hinged floorplate magazine; Monte Carlo stock with textured grip areas and a right-side palm swell; fluted barrel; Flat Dark Earth Cerakote finish; and Accubrake. The Vanguard First Light edition is available in .240 Wthby. Mag., .257 Wthby. Mag., 6.5-300 Wthby. Mag., .270 Win., .308 Win., .30-06, .300 Win. Mag. and .300 Wthby. Mag.

MSRP: $1,090


Lithgow LA102 CrossOver


New to the United States market — though popular in Australia for more than a century — Lithgow Arms is now taking pre-orders on it’s LA102 CrossOver bolt-action rifle, which continues the form-following-function philosophy upon which the Lithgow brand was originally built.

The LA102 CrossOver features Lithgow’s reinforced polymer stock (walnut is also an option), broad/flat fore-end and Cerakote barrel and receiver. Because the American shooting public demands nothing less, the barrel is completely free-floated and threaded, and the action sports a “semi-match” chamber and tri-lug bolt. Unique to Lithgow is the three lever-style trigger module that’s user-adjustable for pull weight, sear engagement and overdraw.

Available in .223 Rem., .243 Win., 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Win., the CrossOver also features an adjustable length of pull with included stock spacers, a three-position safety, single-stack box mag, and a Picatinny rail integrated atop the length of the action.

MSRP: $1,250

Editor’s Note: This article originally appeared in the Shooter’s Guide 2018 of Gun Digest the Magazine.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,020 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Anyone else besides me noticed that articles like this one always seem to leave out Remington these days? Used to be they were the first mentioned in such articles. I wouldn't trade one Remington for two and likely not even for three of any of these.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,135 Posts
In My opinion for what ever it is worth the 700 Remington is by far the best bolt gun on the market the big problem is that bad trigger. My son has one in 270 it went off two times for no reason he is a experienced and 60 years old when I mentioned the problems Remington was having with triggers he said so that is why mine went off almost shot my truck tire one time. with in a couple of hours he ordered a new trigger from an after market company I installed it very easy no more problems. Remington has known about the trigger problem for years and did nothing. If I were to buy a new or used Remington it would also have the trigger replaced as soon as I got it. I do have a Savage 110 Trophy Hunter SS great trigger as set by the factory.


Deaconllb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,960 Posts
Remington triggers have to be kept "spotless", don't keep them spotless and you are asking for trouble!

I have 700's going all the way back to the 1970's, and I've yet to have one cause any problems at all, in any way!

Second problem with them is, folks doing "trigger jobs" on them and set the sear too light or make other modifications to the trigger. I've seen that quite a few times too.

DM
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,020 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Yup for some reason folks just have to mess with sear engagement when doing a trigger job on one. I never have, I only adjust for pull weight. Never had a single issue with any of the many M700 and M7 rifles I've bought.

Just cuz there is an adjustment screw for it doesn't mean ya gotta adjust it.

I like the old triggers far better than what they now put on them. I seriously doubt one has ever gone off without someone in the past haven't worked on it and adjusted sear engagement to a dangerous level. If ya never point a loaded gun at anything ya don't plan to shoot then it's no biggie if it does go off.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,782 Posts
I'm pretty sure these are all either new models for 2018, or new models for the US market in 2018? Did Remington introduce anything new for 2018? I doubt it, as they are likely busy dealing with bankruptcy and reorganization.

There was also no Winchester, Browning, Ruger, Marlin, T/C, Cooper, to name a few.

Check out those made in Spain Bergara Rifles mentioned in the Article. They did/do Remington better than Remington can do them. They also come with a $200 Trigger Tech Trigger that don't go off by itself, or take 8# of pull when you do want it to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
When one of those on the list sells 7 million bought they can take the #2 spot- right under the Rem 700!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Where is the Model 70 Winchesters? How many of those rifles are totally untested by the firearm using consumers? That list seriously flunks the smell test. Personal Experience: Of the three unintentional discharges from Remington's all had Bubba Custom Shop triggers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,333 Posts
Remington 700s never fit me very well for some reason. I’ll take a older model 70 featherweight any day. Or a FN bolt gun. If I must have a bolt gun. But I’d really rather have a lever action. Savage or Winchester or browning. But make mine a lever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,647 Posts
Reading the article, they appear to all be new for 2018, which would explain why Remington isn't on that list.

I hear good things about the Bergara, since they've been making barrels for custom builds for so long, they came out swinging with the B-14. The weatherby, savage, and mossberg got a paint job and new stock offering. Lithgow, Franchi and Mauser seem like new imports, from old makers. The CZ 557 is a lot of gun for the $, but it made this list only because it came out in LH for 2018.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Just a clicky-baity deal.

BUT... I will say that I'm glad to see that it's all turnbolts and that they didn't try to stick in a single shot, a lever gun, and a semi-auto just to be PC. The reality is that turnbolts are where it's at for hunting, for sure. The most superior platform by far, for many reasons discussed before. Love my levers and semis and pumps, but you can't beat a bolt action for hunting.

And how do you define "top"? Where's Proof, Fierce, and Christensen? Those are fine fine rifles. So are Sakos, Coopers, Mausers (new production), Blaser, Steyr, Nosler, and so on.

I dunno about "top", but my favorites that I have are a T/C Icon, a Win 70 FW (FN made), Wby Mk V ULW, another Win 70, Rem Seven, Browning AB2, CZ 527, and CZ 550.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
334 Posts
I have 2 rem 700 adl 30-06s relatively new guns both recalled by Rem for new safeties. I sold a local young man one of my motorcycles. I learned he was later killed by a model 700 that fired in his hunting cabin, the gun just went off.

mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
100 Posts
I kinda like my .280 T/C Venture, the triggers not great but not bad either. I've had Remington 700's, Mauser 98 type, Winchester 70's and Rugers. Liked my Ruger #1 in 7 mag, it shot almost as good as the Venture.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,143 Posts
I have 2 rem 700 adl 30-06s relatively new guns both recalled by Rem for new safeties. I sold a local young man one of my motorcycles. I learned he was later killed by a model 700 that fired in his hunting cabin, the gun just went off.

mike
Wow , that would put me on a guilt trip for sure . I have stayed away from Remington bolt guns ever since hearing of these accidents for several years now . Although it still seems to be the rifle of choice for the military sniper . I am partial to rifles with grooved dovetail receivers like Sako s ,CZ S .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
I kinda like my .280 T/C Venture, the triggers not great but not bad either. I've had Remington 700's, Mauser 98 type, Winchester 70's and Rugers. Liked my Ruger #1 in 7 mag, it shot almost as good as the Venture.
That's a great group that will be better when you subtract .284" to get your center to center measurement.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,198 Posts
Anyone else besides me noticed that articles like this one always seem to leave out Remington these days? Used to be they were the first mentioned in such articles. I wouldn't trade one Remington for two and likely not even for three of any of these.
looks to me other then the weatherby and savage theres just a bunch of crap there that if you paid 600 bucks for today the gun shop wouldn't even want on trade on a good gun. Probably depreciate 50 percent when you walk out the door. I know some like cz's and there good guns but they just don't sell up here. List didn't include Remington 700s, win 70s or ruger 77s. About like reading consumer report with the bias toward jap cars and trucks. Me? if I have 800 bucks to spend on a bolt gun its going to be a 700, 70 or maybe a wby vanguard. If I have only 300 bucks im going to save longer.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
22,198 Posts
so were suppose to believe a rifle sitting on a table just went off all on its own and just happened to aimed right at the guy who was killed? Ill call bs on this one. Then ill ask what the **** he was doing bringing a loaded gun into camp in the first place and standing or sitting with the barrel pointing at himself. 99 percent of the cases that are claimed against 700s are idiots that don't have enough sense to know to keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot and to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. Ive shot the old 700s that are suppose to be guilty of this for over 40 years. Ive probably owned 30 of them through the years and have put many thousands of rounds down range through them and never once has a 700 gone off when my finger wasn't on the trigger. What this is is some stupid sob that practices poor gun handling and has his gun go off and gets embarrassed or shoots someone or family finds someone dead that shot himself and is looking for an excuse. Or want to turn there screw up into money by suiting Remington. Its why everything today has to have a warning label on it. Got to stamp right on the barrel to read your owners manual before shooting. The world is full of stupid people! excluding the very rare chance of a ricochet or blow up every person that's ever been killed with a firearm in the world has had to have a gun pointed at him. Cant fix stupid
I have 2 rem 700 adl 30-06s relatively new guns both recalled by Rem for new safeties. I sold a local young man one of my motorcycles. I learned he was later killed by a model 700 that fired in his hunting cabin, the gun just went off.

mike
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top