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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 9.3x57-but hear people saying it is not as powerful as the 9.3x62[understandably-less cartridge volume] but-in practical hunting terms-using either 250 or 270 gr bullets-how much actual diferance is there?
 

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Should be about 100 fps to 150 fps MAX with those bullet weights. In the real world no difference really. Kinda like the difference between the .308 and .30-06.
 

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Hi There,

The only real advantage in having the 9.3x62 that I can see is that the cases and ammunition is easier to come by that that of 9.3x57. I was surprised just how flat the 9.3x57 shot as I have a Husqvarna Model 46 in this chambering. Not used it on game as yet and have not chronographed any loads so cannot comment on the differences in velocity but concurr with the .308-.30-06 comparision from reading loading manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What I've been able to find out so far is the 9.3x62 has a greater selection of factory loaded shells[ie Sellier & Bellet],whereas the 9.3x57 is pretty much limited to Norma-and more expensive.I am also informed 9.3x57 is easily formed by running readily available 8x57 brass through 9.3x57 dies-which I have obtained[but haven't tried yet].My 9.3x57 is a Husqvarna conversion built on a swede action-very fine workmanship,and in fact I bought this rifle as I already own a couple of swede 6.5x55 rifles and am impressed with the quality-plus low recoil , accuracy-and they sure are very efficient at putting deer down-even black bear with the 140 gr bullets.but-for moose hunting with the possiblilty of running into a grizzly-I wanted something heavier,and the 9.3x57 seemed to offer that.I missed my annual moose hunt this year-so it still remains a theory, but hopefully will get to go next year.
 

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The big advantage (like in the 30-06) is when or if you want to push heavier bullets for the biggest animals...

In the 9.3, i like the 286NP, and that's where the bigger case really shines...

DM
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well given my druthers,I 'd have probaby taken the 9.3x62 over the 9.3x57, but thats what I have-so have to develop a load that will do the job-taking down a moose-and if neccesary a bear
 

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Hi,
When I reload for 9.3x62m/m, I make case's from 30-06. The R.C.B.S. kit comes with a .30 cal.
to .40 cal. expanding die and a form die. If the form die was for 57m/m instead of 62m/m it would
work the same way. Using 8m/m Mauser case could work also. Blc-2 powder with magnum primer
would also shorten the velocity difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
well,I'm kind of interested to see how this cartridge works-I understand they are fairly popular over in Sweden/Norway -but not too well known over here.I'm not overly concerned with the ''short range'' criticism-I don;t shoot over 200 yards anyway-probably 50 to 100 yards is more the rule than the exception-calling moose in where the distance tends to be under 50 yards.I try and locate an old logging road with thick brush either side with a swamp below one side-then set up on the road.50 yards is plenty ,but I want a heavy bullet moving at a modest velocity thats going to hit hard
 

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Hi All,

It seems that the 9.3x57 was developed for Swedish Moose hunters and does not seems to have traveled very far until the release of the rifles from Sweden in the last few years. Finland adopted cartridges based upon the Russian 7.62x54R cartridge and Mosin rifle. Norway had more "Allied" influence and of course used .30-06 in the military late on but I don't know much about what they used sporting wise ???.

I would be happy using mine out to at least 200 yards but the 286 Grn RN bullets seems to require some fairly stiff resistance to open up. The guy who wrote teh "Big Bore" article tried one on a Whitetail and it sailed straight on through ::) sure it dropped the Buck but it ran quite a ways and the wound showed little evidence of expansion. On a larger beast like it Moose it might work better ;) but onyl actually trying it will prove or disprove the theory. Even on Moose or Elk I think I would use something like the RWS 146 Grn Cone Point or even the 270 grn Speer although it didn't shoot as accurately in my rifle.
 

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I have used the Graf brass from Graf and sons for my CZ FS 550, 9.3x62. They were resonable priced and worked great. Just an option. Buckfever
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
well so far I've accumulated some castbullets, a box of 270 gr Speers and a couple of boxes of 250gr swift bullets,along with some 3031 powder but haven't actually reloaded any yet[new to reloading]-any experiance, loads or advice both on accuracy or actual game is appreciated
 

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I think a better comparison is between the .358 Win and .35 Whelen as the 9.3X57 is similar in performance to .358 and the 9.3X62 is in the .35 Whelen class on game or paper. Your 9.3X57 would be great on any game in the US keeping the ranges to under 200 yards. Or practice for longer shots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
truth is-I'm not confident of making shots over 200 yards-in over 50 deer killed-none were over 200 yards-the farthest I ever shot a buck was about 175 yards-several around 100 yards,and the most of them closer to 40 or 50 yards,so I'm not overly concerned about the ''short range'' limitations of a ''200 yard'' riflle-but what IS important is a really good ''smack'' effect of a heavy bullet-I want a lot of energy dumped into a moose so he doesn't feel like running too far after a solid back of the shoulders hit[ever packed moose quarters?]
 

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No, I have not packed Moose quarters ...Yet. I do practice on my walks in the morning. It doesn't sound as dumb as carting around a stuffed moose, but I do use a back pack on my 4 mile walk every morning that I add more weight to every month. About 2 pounds or 1 quart of water. The pack is filled with phone books and 2 liter soda bottles. I also use a step aerobics stick weight as a simulated rifle. My hunting rifles are in the 8 to 9 pound range and I have moved up to a 15 pound stick. You should be able to get them at any local sporting good store. This last October in the mountains of Idaho my .338 was not a problem. Two years ago when I did more gym training than real world training I was ready to sell the thing cheap. I add additional weight to make up for hunting clothes and higher altitude. My thinking was if I had no problems with 15 pounds of rifle and 70 pounds of back pack weight at 1100 feet I should not have problems with 9 pound rifle and 50 -100 pounds of critter for short distances. The only thing I can tell you is to get in shape for your hunt. By the way when I would come home from my walk I would put down the 15 pound weight and pick up a pellet rifle and shoot a couple of shots at a dinger in the back yard. I tried to train my muscles to work even tired to get the shot off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I do 6K [4 miles]about 3 times a week, up and down hills, not packing any extra weight yet[unless the 30 lb I hoped I would get rid of counts-lost 1 lousy pound in 1 whole year-discouraging....]However-I do take along a kid now,but its getting harder to convince them of what a privilege it is to pack out the old mans game.....but-that was one reason I wanted a good heavy bullet-I don't like packing moose out of swamps where they ended up up after being hit.
 

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Your 9.3 will work fine. You have a nice wide bullet, .366 and it hits with 30-06 performance. It should do well as long as you do your part and put the bullet in the heart or break some bone.
I like the Deer in North Carolina on My Step Mom's farm. When hit wrong they run from the woods to the open fields. Makes gutting and pulling the truck up a lot easier.
In your walks try adding a weighted stick first. If you can not find a Step stick go to the pluming department and get a 4' section of 1" black or Galvanized pipe and pit caps on each end and add some water to it. Do not use it as a walking stick but think of it as a rifle. Of course if you live out where walking with a rifle will not draw attention go for it. The police and neighbors already ask me about the stick. When I told one CHP officer he thought it was a good idea. I now see him at the towns shotgun range and he walks with a 9 pound stick. Your 30 extra pounds will fall off. I too carry an extra 30 pounds but it keeps me warm on elk hunts. I am trying to get rid of a lot of it for a spring hog hunt here in California. Those things can move.
When is your Moose hunt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
missed this year-so its next October now-I love calling ,and its a rush when you hear that 'Mwuh,mwuh'' answering .....rake the bushes ,and sit back and wait.....
 

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For those who like numbers...case volume capacity wise....

9.3x57...63.3 gr H2O
9.3x62...76.4 gr h2O

About 13 gr H2O difference

358 Win...57.2 gr H2O
35 Whelen...70.9 gr H2O

About 13 gr H2O difference.

About 6 gr H2O difference between the 9.3 and 35 cal per case size. Not hardly enough to get in a sweat about unless you like to split hairs.

As stated above you...would gain 100 to 150 f/s...more or less...and 36 gr more bullet weight by going from a "standard" 35 cal 250 gr bullet to the "standard" 9.3 cal 286 gr bullet. Going from 9x57 to 9.3X62 is a fairly easily done re-chamber. Basically you gain a larger dia. bullet, more bullet weight and more impact energy over the 35 cal which is why the 9.3x62 is such a good cartridge for 95% of all the worlds game...and so is the 35 cal. One is an American meat and potatoes caliber and one is a European meat and potatoes caliber...so to speak...but your 9.3x57 will handle the chore without any problems also and has done for many years...on both continents.

If I had an original 9.3x57 chambered rifle I wouldn't mess with it at all...just enjoy it.

Whether it is economically feasible to re-chamber it, or whether you want to at all in your application, is what this sport is all about. I have a milsurp M98 waiting in the corner waiting for the holidays to end to order a 9.3x62 chambered barrel from Lothar Walther...I don't "need" another large caliber...my rack is full of them...but I'm filling out all those calibers I always dreamed about, wanted to have, but never built. ;D 8) ::)

In my younger days I used to walk/run the high school football stadium bleachers with a back pack weighing from 40 to 80 lbs or whatever I calculated would be the weight I would haul during long backpacks or hunting/fishing camps. I started low of course, but I never thought about using a weighted walking stick. That is a very good Idea. I usually carry an 8 to 10 lb rifle or shotgun all the time when I am beating the woods because I live 35 miles out in the boonies in bear/cat country so at least I get some arm workout, but I don't haul any "extra" weight...not that I shouldn't.

Happy Holidays

'Njoy
 
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