Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
May have already been posted but I'd recommend most of
James Micheners novels to folks that enjoy reading.

With great attention to detailing the geography and cultures
of places across the U.S. and the rest of the world he expressed
stories of individuals and generations of families. Good stuff.
I've read most of the novels I could find and some of the nonfiction.
The ones that stand out after several years are:

THE SOURCE
If I was to recommend 1 book that everyone should read, this would be it.
A telling of the cradle of 3 religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

TEXAS
Well, I am a Texan, born and raised. But really, this telling of
the history of what is now Texas was eye opening and entertaining.

HAWAII
I've never been to Hawaii but felt like I knew it after this read.
But then again, this is typical of reading his books.

CHESAPEAKE
I've wanted to take an extended vacation to travel, fish and hunt
this huge area ever since reading this one. VERY good.

I could go on as the commitment to detail and true compassion for the
land, the cultures and individuals of ALL places are evident in each of his books.
Just do a search of his works and I'd be willing to bet there's at least one that
is about an area near and dear to your heart.


PK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
The only Mitchner book I have read is "Centennial".
He spins a good yarn, but double check anything he says before you quote it as fact.
..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Not quite sure what you're refering to. Michener did write several books that were not
fiction and I'd be willing to bet he researched them well. Centennial is a good representation
of his fiction (though ot one of my favorites) and again, it is fiction.

I'd be interested to know just what you are refering to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
977 Posts
I read constantly. I recently discovered a great historical fiction series by the late Patrick O'Brien. I have purchased the 1st 10 books and I’m currently reading the 6th book in the series (The Fortunes of War). O'Brien has a very different style from any other author that I have ever read and it took me about 30 pages of tyhe 1st book before I could follow along and not miss important details, and go back and reread passages. It is a great series an I cannot believe that I had not read it sooner.


Master & Commander – A great introduction to the series. The main Characters of the series meet and become life long friends. Very good book. It lead directly to my acquiring other books in the series.

Post Captain – If this were the 1st book in the series…I never would have gone further. And I may not have finished this book. So far it is my least favorite of the series, but I must also say that the details in this book de keep recurring with some regularity in the later volumes. But for my tastes, this book wasn’t just bland…it was cardboard.

HMS Surprise – This was a fascinating and exciting book. I thoroughly enjoyed the storyline and the accurate presentation of the time period.

The Maritius Command – Aubrey gains a Commodore’s Commission and now has several ships under his command. Another great book in the series.

Desolation Island – The title is Desolation Island, but this geographic location is not pertinent until the very end of the book. Still…a very good book.

The Fortune of War – This is the current book that I am reading and it takes off pretty much where the previous book left the reader.

I normally read Physics Books, Chemistry Books, Forensic Science Books and anything history related. This series has been a very nice change of pace for my leisure reading, and I believe that there are 20 or so books in the series.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Rock Home Isle, I couldn't agree with you more. I own all of his books in this series and have read them at least three times. A tremendous story by a great author.

I also recommend the books by Allen W. Eckert. They are historical narratives about the early settlement of the USA and the historical characters involved. Great reads every one.

'Give Your Heart To The Hawks' by Winfred Blevins is a really good, but brief, narrative about the Mountain Men.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44,135 Posts
Another vote for Allen W Eckert....His books are listed as fiction, but only because he occasionally writes of a conversation between two historical figures which 'probably' took place. Other than that you can rely on the historical accuracy.
Three recomends;
A) Wilderness War...Revolutionary War..much of it the Sullivan expedition to break the Iroquois confederacy.

B) Wilderness Empire...French and Indian War.

C) The Frontiersmen...Simon Kenton and the exploring of Ohio & Kentucky

A newly discovered author (new to me, that is)...Bernard Cornwell . I am reading his book .."The Fort".. concerning the Revolutionary War in Penobscot Bay, and the battle for British Fort George. The general story is close, though he does do some name substitution. The stories are filled with details as to gear, equipment and tactics etc, that only a well studied author would be aware of.
You may recall when his series about Richard Sharp, British soldier (served from 1799-1821)...was seriaslized for TV..an excellent series. When I finish this book, I plan on checking out his book called "Agincourt".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Yes, I especially enjoyed The Frontiersmen. Up until I read it, I never realized that Simon Kenton (Butler) played such an important part in the history of that region. We hear so much about David Crockett and Daniel Boone that the other great frontiersmen are overlooked, even though they were at least as important as the other two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
PKnTX said:
May have already been posted but I'd recommend most of
James Micheners novels to folks that enjoy reading.

With great attention to detailing the geography and cultures
of places across the U.S. and the rest of the world he expressed
stories of individuals and generations of families. Good stuff.
I've read most of the novels I could find and some of the nonfiction.
The ones that stand out after several years are:

THE SOURCE
If I was to recommend 1 book that everyone should read, this would be it.
A telling of the cradle of 3 religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

TEXAS
Well, I am a Texan, born and raised. But really, this telling of
the history of what is now Texas was eye opening and entertaining.

HAWAII
I've never been to Hawaii but felt like I knew it after this read.
But then again, this is typical of reading his books.

CHESAPEAKE
I've wanted to take an extended vacation to travel, fish and hunt
this huge area ever since reading this one. VERY good.

I could go on as the commitment to detail and true compassion for the
land, the cultures and individuals of ALL places are evident in each of his books.
Just do a search of his works and I'd be willing to bet there's at least one that
is about an area near and dear to your heart.


PK
Don't forget Michener - Alaska


For Westerns - I recommend
The Cowboy and the Cossack by Clair Huffaker (Highly Recommend)
Takes place in the Old East -- Siberia, to be exact -- where a group of Montana cowboys have come with a herd of Texas longhorns to be driven thousand of miles across Siberia.

Sea of Grass by Conrad Richter
The Sea of Grass concerns the often violent clashes between the pioneering ranchers, whose cattle range freely through the vast sea of grass, and the farmers, or "nesters," who build fences and turn the sod.

The Ox-bow Incident by Walter Van Tilburg Clark
Focuses on the lynching of three innocent men and the tragedy that ensues when law and order are abandoned.

For those that Like period cultural pieces - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_Library_100_Best_Novels On the list are great works that include cultural and period pieces. Both editors and readers lists are represented. (Since I don't watch TV anymore, I have been reading all the ones off the Readers list for quite a while now)

My winter reading this year is all the Clancy Novels (I picked up all the hard covers at a garage sale for 5.00 a piece).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
The Far Pavillions by M.M.Kaye. It is about the regions that we are fighting in right now, but based at the time when the Brits controlled everything. I was reading this when 9/11 happened. It was really neat to be reading about places one minute and then hear about the same place on the news.

+1 on The Cowboy and The Cossack.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,534 Posts
Just finished America Before 1491. If that's not the correct title it is closs and a search should pull up the correct title. Facinating facts about errors in historical writings. Buffalo were not rampant in America until Indians died off from several disease epidemics - stuff like that.

The Worst Hard Time is about the dust bowl area of the Texas Panhandle during the 30's. Very gripping book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
This will be my next read -

I was recommended Night Comes to the Cumberlands: A Biography of a Depressed Area.

At the time it was first published in 1962, it framed such an urgent appeal to the American conscience that it actually prompted the creation of the Appalachian Regional Commission, an agency that has pumped millions of dollars into Appalachia.

Caudill's study begins in the violence of the Indian wars and ends in the economic despair of the 1950s and 1960s. Two hundred years ago, the Cumberland Plateau was a land of great promise. Its deep, twisting valleys contained rich bottomlands. The surrounding mountains were teeming with game and covered with valuable timber. The people who came into this land scratched out a living by farming, hunting, and making all the things they need-including whiskey.

The quality of life in Appalachia declined during the Civil War and Appalachia remained "in a bad way" for the next century. By the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, Appalachia had become an island of poverty in a national sea of plenty and prosperity. Caudill's book alerted the mainstream world to our problems and their causes. Since then the ARC has provided millions of dollars to strengthen the brick and mortar infrastructure of Appalachia and to help us recover from a century of economic problems that had greatly undermined our quality of life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44,135 Posts
Here's a recomendation for a good book...a non-fiction book..

Title: STINKING CREEK: portrait of a small mountain community in Appalachia

Author: John Fetterman

Concerns Stinking Creek, Ky and the federal government's efforts to "help" the local folks. Problem was the govt tried to run the show with bureaucrats sent from DC. They disn't understand the people or their culture and tried to force programs the people did not want. Johnson's "war on poverty" worked as well there as in many other places..millions spent, and leaving the people in perhaps more poverty than previously.
A REAL difference was made however, by two humble nurses on a Christian mission, saved the children and turned lives around. They demonstrated gardening, sanitary practices and sanitation around the home...among many other things.
Contrary to the govt program, much was accomplished by these two nurses at very little cost...and no cost to the taxpayer.
Christians paid it through donations.
Check out this very interesting video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25CKvSVZlwM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,187 Posts
ironglow said:
Here's a recomendation for a good book...a non-fiction book..

Title: STINKING CREEK: portrait of a small mountain community in Appalachia

Author: John Fetterman

Concerns Stinking Creek, Ky and the federal government's efforts to "help" the local folks. Problem was the govt tried to run the show with bureaucrats sent from DC. They disn't understand the people or their culture and tried to force programs the people did not want. Johnson's "war on poverty" worked as well there as in many other places..millions spent, and leaving the people in perhaps more poverty than previously.
A REAL difference was made however, by two humble nurses on a Christian mission, saved the children and turned lives around. They demonstrated gardening, sanitary practices and sanitation around the home...among many other things.
Contrary to the govt program, much was accomplished by these two nurses at very little cost...and no cost to the taxpayer.
Christians paid it through donations.
Check out this very interesting video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=25CKvSVZlwM
Thanks IG , I will pick this one up as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44,135 Posts
It's a good read Scootrd, my heart went out to the families..and they were very much abused by the coal co. operators. One thing I noticed, in spite of all the misleading talk and the fact that such a hard life caused the adults to age ahead of their time, the children were quite attractive ! cute little urchins in ragged clothes.
One problem with the young govt workers sent to "help" the community; most of them were city types who could not even begin to underestand the folks of Appalachia..but instead, proceeded to ridicule them.
Well worth the time of reading.

I believe you can find a good video on youtube.com , which was made as a re-visit by the daughter of the author decades aftyer the book was written. just search youtube for stinking creek.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
ironglow said:
Another vote for Allen W Eckert....His books are listed as fiction, but only because he occasionally writes of a conversation between two historical figures which 'probably' took place. Other than that you can rely on the historical accuracy.
Three recomends;
A) Wilderness War...Revolutionary War..much of it the Sullivan expedition to break the Iroquois confederacy.

B) Wilderness Empire...French and Indian War.

C) The Frontiersmen...Simon Kenton and the exploring of Ohio & Kentucky

A newly discovered author (new to me, that is)...Bernard Cornwell . I am reading his book .."The Fort".. concerning the Revolutionary War in Penobscot Bay, and the battle for British Fort George. The general story is close, though he does do some name substitution. The stories are filled with details as to gear, equipment and tactics etc, that only a well studied author would be aware of.
You may recall when his series about Richard Sharp, British soldier (served from 1799-1821)...was seriaslized for TV..an excellent series. When I finish this book, I plan on checking out his book called "Agincourt".
ironglow,
You'll really enjoy Agincourt.
As far as historical fiction is concerned, Bernard Cornwell rates among the best.
The "Sharpe's" series starts (chronologically) in 1799, in British India through the Napoleonic Wars and the defeat of Napoleon 1821.
The "Starbuck" series takes place during the American Civil War, from Bull Run through Antietam.
The "Grail Quest" series is about the search for the Holy Grail in the 14th century, during the Hundred Years War.
The "Saxon" series is about England during the reign of Alfred the Great, and his attempt to unite England.
A few of his stand alone novels:
Redcoat - deals with Valley Forge during the Revolutionary War from a Redcoats point of view.
Stonehenge - deals with building of the temple in the title.
Gallows Thief - a tale of a a "detective" in old England.
Agincourt - deals with the battle between the Knights of France and the archers of England.
He has another series dealing with King Arthur's Britain (The Warlord Chronicles), and another 6-8 individual novels including the previously mentioned "The Fort", which I haven't been able to locate, or read yet.
I have yet to be disappointed by any books written by the following authors: James Michener, Bernard Cornwell, or JamesClavell.
A few other recommendations: Gary Jennings - Aztec (about Aztecs, and the fall of Mexico), Steven Pressfield - Gates of Fire (about the Battle of Thermopylae), Cormac McCarthy - Blood Meridian (about the wild west).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
OldSchoolRanger-
James Clavell is another of my favorites as well. His Asian series is a great telling of
the history and culture of that continent with the mixing of fact and fiction.
And McCarthy just may be the best living American novelist.



Killer Angels by Michael Shaara fits the historical fiction genre and is a great read.
(Don't take my word for it, it won the Pulitzer Prize :)). The battle of Gettysburg as lived
by those that directed it.
His son Jeff followed up with Gods And Generals and The Last Full Measure.


My wife just got an IPad so I'll probably inherit her Kindle. Hopefully some of the
recommendations given here will be available on it. ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
For a real get your attention book nonfiction get a copy of S.C. Gwynne's "Empire Of the Summer Moon". The rise and fall of the Comanches. This covers the rise of the Texas Rangers and the unbelievable horrors of the American Southwest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44,135 Posts
Just starting jeff shaara's "Rise To Rebellion"..pre and early Revolutionary War. Appears to be much in the style of Allen W Eckert, listed as fiction but an accurate, well researched and detailed history lesson..really enjoying it !
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top