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I've been working with metals for over 50 years, I know titanium is tough, but, I'm not really sold on the thought of popping a .44 in a handgun made from the material. What are your thoughts? Has anyone had, or do you know of problems after long term use?

Just a gee-whiz question........
 

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titanium

Titanium is just about a perfect material for firearms, at least the actions and perhaps barrels too but it is as you stated very hard to machine and consequently difficult to cut or form rifling. Besides it's corrosion resistance it posseses a quality of being able to withstand millions of stress cycles without fatigue. It is as strong as most gun steel and plenty strong for the pressures found in firearms. Casting or any hot working of it is more difficult because it must be done in an inert environment, above 1000 degrees F it rapidly absorbs oxygen out of the atmosphere ruining it. I fabricate all kinds of parts out of titanium, welded and machined and it is a wonder metal in the right application. One other down side to titanium that is a factor in firearms is that threaded fasteners tend to gall so you need to use a dissimallar material screw or bolt and some type of anti-seize on the threads.

Will titanium replace steel, no way, steel is the most usefull low cost strong as **** and readily worked stuff on the planet. Steel is still the miracle metal just like when with the invention of the Bessemer furnace we first were able to make it.

Mike C
 

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The question is not whether it's titanium, but whether the alloy is suitable for firearms use. If you get the wrong titanium alloy, it will crack like a piece of candy. I'd be just as reluctant to fire a 44 made from the wrong iron alloy (i.e. steel), as from the the wrong titanium alloy.
 

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Titanium

rockbilly: You should not have a concern about the 'safety' aspect of firing a Titanium handgun. It is strong enough for the major manufacturers to use it without problem.

The only concern I would have is recoil. What you lose in weight to the Titanium over steel, you make up for in recoil.

Example: I shoot an Aluminum framed S&W Lightweight Bodyguard - unloaded weighs 13 oz. A buddy has a Titanium S&W (whatever the model) with the internal hammer (first one to come out). I didn't think there would be a difference with only one ounce of weight separating the two but there was. You could notice the difference. I even took his grips off and put my grips on - you could still notice the difference. Not a lot at first but as the range session continued, the discomfort level began to build.

I can easily go through 150 rounds of my reloads with my revolver before it's time for a cold one. With the Titanium revolver the clock seemed to slow down and it became uncomfortable after about 100 rounds. Not so uncomfortable as it did become 'work' rather than fun to shoot the thing. After I got tired of the Titanium revolver, my own lightweight bodyguard seemed a bit heftier.

I hope I haven't strayed off topic and that I did address your concern. They would be great for 'pocket' carry and maybe even plinking with light loads. If you load heavier or carry heavy reloads, your recoil will be heavier but, if you only practice with those once in a while you should be just fine. Good luck and let us know. Mikey.
 
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