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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You anneal brass cartridge cases the same way for either blackpowder or smokeless (GASP! I actually said THE WORD!!) powder.

1. Stand the empty cartridges up in a pan of water. Use about an inch of water in the pan to protect the base and head from heat. You can even do this with primed cases!

2. Using a propane torch with flame spreader tip, play the flame slowly down the row of cases, pausing just enough to see the tempering colors (straw, light blue, dark blue) develope. When the colours appear, knock the case over into the water to quence it. Naturally, you do not knock over primed cases if you want to save the primer.

3. Another method is to darken the room lights, and heat each case until it starts to glow a dark red.

4. The last method is to hold the empty, unprimed case in the flame of your kitchen or campstove burner. Look for the appearance of the tempering colors and then dump into a container of water.

5. The water quench is not absolutely necessary. It just makes it convenient if you want to handle the cases quick.
:shock:
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

Is there a way to tell when you need to do it, other than cases starting to split? Do you just anneal after a certain number of loadings?
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

I finally found a Lee product that is worthwhile.

Get the Lee case trimming set up for what ever caliber you are working with. Put the hexagon end in your electric screwdriver. Put the cartridge in the shell holder and put just the neck if case in the flame of the spreader tip of a propane torch. If you use a spreader tip the flame will heat the brass slower. the revoling case will be uniformly heated . When you see the blue color move down the neck, just as it hits the shoulder dip the case in water.

Don't worry about burning the brass, just make sure you anneal.

If it feels like it ishard to resize the brass or the bullet goes in hard you are one reload past the piont that you need to anneal. What ever brass survives this point should annealed before it is resized again.

If you shoot the Martini 577/450 you must do this everytime you reload.
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

I can vouch for spinning the cases with the Lee trimmer holder.
I have an ancient propane torch with a 5/8 dia head. I spin the case to evenly distribute the heat around the neck. Hold the case outside of the blue inner cone and move slowly from the mouth to the shoulder with the case spinning.
This is probably best done in a dark room. The brass is adequately annealed at just a barely visible dull red. Takes about 4 seconds from the time the flame hits the case until you pull it out of the flame and dunk it in water. I use a battery powered drill because the chuck hold the trimmer shank but you can can do well with an electric screwdriver too.
I try to run the colors about 1/4 below the most heavily worked part of the neck but stay at least 1.5 inches from the case head unless you are using a short case like a 50/70.
Ed
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

I don't know if it's the best, but it's the coolest!






BC 100 Automatic Case Annealer

Automatically anneals 1,000 case necks per hour. Increases brass life and improves accuracy. Ensures proper chamber seal. A must for forming wildcat cartridges. Comes complete with one cartridge head wheel. Additional wheels available, .22 Hornet to .50 cal. BMG. $300.00.


http://www.kenlightmfg.com/products.html


It's what's on MY Birthday Wish List!


Chuck
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

That rotating wheel annealer, or somthing like it has been around for years. Common complaint is/was that it doesn't heat uniformly.

The electric srewdriver I use is one of those rechargable jobs with the straight handle. It revolves slowly and works good. The oversize screwdriver handle gives me good control.
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

That rotating wheel annealer, or somthing like it has been around for years. Common complaint is/was that it doesn't heat uniformly.

The electric srewdriver I use is one of those rechargable jobs with the straight handle. It revolves slowly and works good. the oversize screwdriver handle control.
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

Guys,


After realizing that I’ve got to do a bunch of annealing to form some brass for Ball-Wall #2, I’ve been doing some research into the subject. I never knew there was so much good info available, until I started looking for it. Three very good sources for info I’ve found are:

Howell’s book; “Designing and Forming Custom Cartridges for Rifles and Pistols”, which dedicates an entire chapter to annealing brass. There’s a web version at:

http://www.gun-tests.com/performance/jun96cases.html

Also, an article in MAR 1998 “Precision Shooting” called “Practical Aspects of Case Neck Annealing” Jim Harris.

And, Dean Grennell’s “ABCs of Reloading”

Here’s some of what I’ve learned. According to Howell (one of the best works IMHO), and another one of my sources, annealing takes place at 650-675. Howell likes, and recommends the cordless drill method of annealing with either the Lee shell holder or a bronze brush, but with the addition of temp sticks, rather than relying on color. He’s against the “dull red” color method, as it’s beyond that temperature range and softens the brass too much. He prefers to use temp sticks to verify temperatures.

Here’s a pretty good description with excellent photos:

http://www.real-guns.com/Commentary/comar46.htm

I also researched the BC-1000 Automatic Case Annealer, and on the recommendation of one of the prominent shooters in this sport, I went ahead and bought one. Besides, I always have a justification for one more toy, and being lazy, it’s a plus when it’s a labor saving device :lol: Since one poster mentioned that these machines don’t do a consistent job of annealing, I’ll explain how it operates and maybe change that view.

The BC1000 consists of an aluminum wheel (shell holder) that rotates very slowly in a clockwise direction using an electric motor. In the center of the aluminum wheel is a reservoir for hot water, which both, preheats the cases, controls the case’s maximum temperature, and guards against over annealing the brass. The aluminum wheel rotates on a platform consisting of a sloping track with a friction strip on it. As the cases/wheel rotate clockwise, the cartridge rims are in contact with the sloped friction strip which imparts a counterclockwise rotation to each case. The cases rotate past two propane torches which heat the case necks as they rotate past the flames, and rotate in their shell holders. The temperature is adjusted by adjusting the flame intensity, and the area annealed is adjusted by moving the torches up or down in their holders.

Since this is mechanical in operation each case spends the same amount of time in flame contact. With the cases rotating, the case neck gets two revolutions while being annealed. Every case gets the same number of rotations, and the time spent in the torch flames is very consistent. The instructions, which are very detailed and easy to follow (even for me), call for adjusting the intensity and proximity of the flames to gain a blue to orange color on the case neck area. This is pretty easy to do, but I prefer the temperature crayon method as it’s more exact. IAW the BC1000 instructions, the neck area should be heated to a temp of 750-800 degrees. Since annealing is a function of time and temperature, the higher temp is used due to the shorter duration of exposure. I like the Temperature Crayons, because I don’t have to rely on my ability to tell what “blue to orange” color. According to my references, you can “under anneal” repeatedly without harming a case until you reach the desired temp. So it’s simply; start low, and work your way up by adjusting your flames higher. I verified an even temp by using a temp crayon around the “neck” on my test case.


Once the machine is set up (about 1 hour in my case) it’s time to rock and roll! 8) As the instructions state:

“When you get the faint blue color and the shine remains on the case, you have everything adjusted to perfection. Start stuffing those little brass cases in the little round holes until you’re done. Make a note of your set-up, and you’ll be able to repeat it in about 3 minutes the next time you’re ready to anneal.”

Once going, this thing is amazing! I did 250 cases in about 15 minutes and that’s just my first run. The hardest part was feeding my brass and emptying my collection box. All my brass came out with a consistent light bluish color on the neck area reminiscent of the coloring on military brass, but lighter.

Now that I’ve got it set up, I’ve recorded all the adjustments so I can go back later. Instructions call for about 3 minutes of set-up time, once you know you’re settings, I’m giving my self 10! :lol: Since everything I’m shooting BPCRwise is based on the 45-70 case, I can get by with one wheel and only using the height adjustment for my torches. As luck would have it, the 45-70 wheel is the same one for belted magnums, so I’m covered there.

Overall, it’s an impressive little machine. It’s not cheap by any means, but it is very, very fast, and from what I can tell after my first use does a good job at consistency. Never did one of my cases glow “orange” and they all look to be the same after cooling. My plan is to start every shooting season with freshly annealed brass. With the rate this thing cranks them out, it should take me about 90 minutes. :p


Chuck
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

What I have used on 300 Win brass for years is to blacken the neck and shoulder area with a candle then use a propane torch while spinning the case in a drill apply the flame just long enough to burn off the Blackening.
any longer and you most likely will begin to melt the case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Brass annealing

All this talk about brass annealing and temperatures reminds me of the other old-timer's trick for case annealing:

After first dipping the case mouth in light motor oil, immerse the nect/shoulder of the case into your molten lead pot. Hold for a couple fo seconds, withdraw, and tap the case (or fling it, CAREFULLY) to free any lead that sticks, and drop it into a can of water.

The lead pot should be set to "high" temperature (800-900 degrees), and you should use pliers to hold the case. and use appropriate eye/face procection and clothing, of course.
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

John

I'm a complete novice at this, never annealed a case in my life. Why the light motor oil? The rest is obvious, even to me.
 

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Annealing

The oil inhibits soldering the bath to the case. I find that purer lead has a higher fusion point and adheres less well to the brass.
I hold the case in my bare fingers by the rim and dip, even cases as short as .38 Special. It assures that the head does not overheat.
Cheers from Grayest California,
Ross
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

Esteamed Dr. Shrink,

The oil or something like it is used to keep the lead from sticking to the brass.

Y'all be good.

horsefly
 

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How is the best way to anneal brass?

Gentlemen,

Just out of curousity, before I try this, what if anything does the oil do to the lead? Should I use non-petroleum oil if I'm gonna cast (and I am) for BP? :oops: :)
 
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