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I hear that, at least some, people out west like to hunt out of vehicles. Like driving up as close as possible and then jumping out and letting the bullets fly. Is this legal? And is it common? I know most if not all of you would find this unethical and unsportsmanlike. But seems people who do it sure like to brag about it. I realize that a person could be driving somewhere and see an animal; then get out, load up and try to stalk it. But this is not what I am talking about. Is there enough of this going on for antelope that I could have to worry about my hunt getting screwed up by a driveby shooter?
 

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I have not heard of anyone doing that out here. If they are, the are probably breaking the law. You may not hunt within I think 50 yards from a road, maybe 150, in Colorado. Not sure on the exact number. They would have to be driving off the road, which I'm almost positive is illegal on public land anyway. Maybe leagal on private land. Shouldn't mess up your hunt. Word of advice... hunt far enough from the roads that vehicles can't get to. If you do happen to see someone doing that, calling the DOW might be a good idea. Also, I thing you should hit them with a really big stick. :D
 

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longwinters,

There's an old saying, "believe nothing that you hear and only half of what you see". In California the only people that are allowed to hunt from a vehicle are the disabled hunters and then only with a special license. Of course like any area we get so called hunters that break the laws. I you were to see someone doing such a thing then notify the local game authorities. No one needs idiots like this doing such a thing. Just gives more fuel for the anti-hunter groups in taking away our hunting rights. Lawdog
 

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another antelope answer

Hi, I shouldn't jump in with out introducing myself.

My Name is SHB Iv'e been a huntaholic for 36 yrs, I found all these great forums about 3 months ago, it is alot of fun for me to read about everybodyelse's experiences.

I have chased antelopes off and on since I was 16. I started out with a bow cause I didn't know any better. Now I hunt them because the only thing that tastes better than an Antelope is a wild hog.

It has been my experience that if you are hunting on BLM in WY it will be hard to escape the goat chasing pickuptruck shooters ( the term hunters should never be applied to these bad apples) But there are two factors in an antelopes behavior that will allow you to be take advantage of all the gas the bad apples are burning. 1. The goats are alot more territorial than most people realize and 2. You can pattern their escape routes.

when the yahoos are out on opening day the antelopes get bounced around so much they start keying on vehicles and will walk right by an orange clad hunter without even noticing him.
If you locate a herd of antelope in a large pasture or basin you can spook them off and they will be back there the next day (usually). The trick is to pay attention to how they leave. You will notice that they use the same escape route almost every time. If you are waiting within shootin range of that escape route when the sun comes up you will have a darn good shot at your goats before noon.

This has worked so often for me, that it is rare for me or someone I'm guiding to have to hunt longer than one day unless we're looking for a specific trophy. hope this gives you some good Ideas
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the good info. I should have about 5 days to to hunt so maybe my 2 boys and I can get into some exciting action. We will be going out the 1st full week of Oct. Who knows, maybe the pickup possee boys will be out of gas by then.
 

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:grin: These people are around.I think this is poor sportsmanship even when it's not illegal. It's a good way to wound animals for no good reason. A shot at a standing antelope is a lot more likely to be fatal than blasting away as they are running off. Getting over the hill from the road is a good idea. :sniper:
 

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if you get caught doing that here you lose your licencse(hunting) your vehicle, your gun and your rights to hunt and fish for a certain amount of time, plus you might also face poaching charges
 

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:) Sure it happens!!! Most of the folks doing it are from East of the Big Muddy or west of the Sierra Nevadas. Where I hunt if I see it I just shoot em then find a mine shaft and.... well you get the picture. But seriously don't let me see it happen cause I'll have the warden on you like stink on cow dung. :evil:
 

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Yes, people do hut out of the backs of trucks for antelope especially in MT. Last year was my first year hunting, and though I didn't tag one I did it legally. When I was talking to the natives, they told me to have a buddy drive me in my truck ,while I'm in the back and chase antelope that way. I just laughed it off, thinking it was a joke. the more people that told me their so called hunting method, I realized it was not a joke. It's highly illegal, and people that do it are nothing but poachers.

HogFan
 

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It's called "road hunting" and happens more than we realize. This also happens for deer, elk and moose. It seems that anywhere you have real good visibility and a lot of open or semi-open country like we do here in WY so called "hunters" take advantage of this situation. Misuse of ATV's is another problem here with the operators driving on closed roads or across open prairie.
A lot of "hunters" have forgotten what their legs are for! :cry: :x
 

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My first year chasing goats I did it with a friend that I no longer hunt big game with, although I pursue upland and waterfowl with him. He came screaming up with his Suburban and said he had located a herd with a nice buck in it. He told me to get in, let's go. We went into the pasture and the goats were spooked already, they had a quarter-mile lead on us and he tried to catch them. I remember looking over at the speedometer at one point between looking for the seatbelt, trying to hold my gun, and avoiding the roof of the Suburban, the speedometer read 65 mph and we weren't gaining an inch. He literally chased them into the next county and they became illegal for us to pursue, and for some reason chasing them with the Suburban was ok, but he wouldn't chase them in the next county, o figure. In any case, I requested to be returned to my vehicle, I bid him adieu and good luck, call me if you get stuck, but I won't hunt big game with him anymore. So yes, chasing occurs, I'm ashamed to say Ive been an unwilling party to it.
Selmer
 

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Just curious, I'm still fairly new to hunting, and have only bowhunted Javelina so far. We drove around to different glassing points to try to spot the animals, and once spotted, grabbed our gear and tried to stalk in on them. So would you consider this hunting from a vehicle? Moving around and trying to spot them? In Arizona, you're legal as long as you are one step off the roadway, so in essence if you drove around, spotted them, and stepped off the roadway you're legal, for bow or rifle. However, I'd rather have a shot at a calm animal, or unsuspecting... I spotted my javelina after we drove in a gate, we grabbed our gear, stalked in, and ended up calling them in with a call, so he wasn't exactly calm, but he was unsuspecting to have an arrow go into his ribs and out his butt.. It wasn't the best shot, could of been a lot better, but he went down very quickly.
 

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There's nothing wrong with using a vehicle to drive to vantage points and glassing for game. This method, Spot and Stalk, is the preferred method of a lot of antelope hunters, especially in game areas (units) that are large in size. It's when you Pursue them using the vehicle to give the hunter an unfair advantage that's, in my opinion, unethical. After you've spotted the antelope and determined that that's the one for you, then stalk on FOOT and get into position for a good shot. Antelope are a lot better table fare if they're relaxed and calm when shot rather than running, their eyes bulging and tongues hanging out. :wink:
 

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I have witnessed a lot of people shooting from their vehicle and MOST of them were non-resident hunters. Locals know how to get to ambush points and while they may use their vehicle to get to a position, most will at least get out to shoot. Wyoming does not have any laws against having a loaded gun in the vehicle so I guess this probably encourages road hunting. The hunting regs state that safety dictates that firearms "should" be unloaded while inside vehicles. It would make us all look a lot better to the "uncommitted" crowd if we policed our own, so if you see someone breaking a law, report them.
 
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