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Do any of you folks out there fish for catfish? I grew up fishing for catfish and bream.

Back in my youth from about age 8 or so we had a cabin about 300 yards off the Coosa River near Woods Ferry which wasn't so far from Lincoln, AL. This was a very remote section back in the early 50s when we build it. It was on 1000 acres of land and surrounded by several other thousands of acres with few other humans to be seen.

There was a lake of maybe 3-4 acres at most beside the cabin that was so thick with bream you could catch the young ones on a bare hook. I often used the yellow bloom of a bitterweed for bait.

The walk to the river was maybe 300 yards. There was a road of sorts but in those days all we had was an old car and the road wasn't really a car kinda road. The folks who farmed the land used it with their tractors and a few folks who had old trucks were able to get thru some of the time if it was real dry. For the most part tho we toted what we needed to the boat landing. We had an old wooden battue dad made that stayed chained to a tree at the boat landing. In those days no one bothered stuff that didn't belong to them and the lock wasn't really necessary to keep it from being stolen so much as to keep it from washing away in the current.

The landing was on the narrow side of the channel made by an island almost a mile long and anywhere from 50 to 200+ yards wide near to Emory's Bend. The island was called Emory's Island. We put out several trot lines around the area of the island and it was always a good place for a mess of catfish. The banks of the lazy old river were lined with willows, catalpa trees and other of lesser importance to a fisherman. We'd anchor or more often tie up and fish down stream using bottom rigs for catfish and sometimes with floats and worms or crickets for bream. Dad also had some baskets he used and boy did we take in the catfish in those at times.

Got lots more tales of catfishing and some bream fishing tales also.

Do any of you fish for catfish either with, rod cane pole or trotline?

GB
 

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As a kid I would often fish for pout. In New England we have a small catfish called pout. There are two varieties. White bellied and yellow bellied. Both , I believe, really are one and the same. They only grow to around a couple of pounds. I used to use dough balls on a single hook. It was very popular to sit along the shore and fish for them. You had to watch out for the mouth. They'd clamp down pretty good on you if you were careless.
 

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:D My dad was neither hunter nor shooter, but was an avid fisherman! He loved crappie and bluegill, and when they were running, stripped bass. He wasn't much of a catfisherman, so I got a pretty late start on the whisker fish. In the early eighties I started fishing with a man I had met at work. His technique for bluegill was a little different than what I was accustom to, but it didn't take me long to see that he was on to something! I had a small jon boat that we used on small creeks, ponds, and lakes. He would skul the boat with one hand and use a fly rod with an automatic reel with the other. As he approached a likley spot, he'd simply roll cast to where he wanted it. When he got a bite, and set the hook, if the fish was on, he'd simply trigger the automatic real and land his fish. I guess it would be needless to say that by our second trip, I had a similar setup. I spent most of the day slapping the water, dodging flying hooks and trying to untangle myself. I don't think either of us caught anything that trip, but he had front row center to a standup comedy act so didn't mind too much. I practiced in the backyard till I had it down. I now use a fly rod for almost everything.
This same fellow enjoyed catting almost as much as bluegills. He'd show up with his off shore tackle so he cast his 2 pounds of float, sinker and bait to the opposite shore. I brought my fly rod. I think he found this to be even more amusing than my first fly rodding day, he kept looking at me, laugh and shake his head. He caught a couple of good eating sized fish that day. I caught more!! Just as we were getting ready to leave, I got another bite. I eased in my slack till I could feel the fish starting to leave with my bait and set the hook. I thought I had missed the fish and hooked a log. That is untill the log started to take line, what a fight!!! I know it had to be less than five minutes but it sure seemed longer!! Any way after the fish was netted and in the boat I heard him mumbling something about never laughing at my fly rod any more. It wasn't a huge fish by any streach of the imigination, but till you've caught an 8# channel cat on a 9 foot 5 weight fly rod you'r missing a serious thrill. So at the risk of repeating myself, I now use a fly fod for almost everything!
 

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I take time away from the trout stream during spring runoff and fish for catfish. Yes, we have catfish up here in Montana, not big though but have landed three that were 20+ pounds. Haven't tried a flyrod however and likely won't. All the cats here are river fish and would have little or no chance to land any. Lots of dead trees and other assorted treats that the cats use to their advantage.
 

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Oh yeah...love to fish for them big cats....be glad when warm weather gets back so we can go haul some in. Best bait Ive found for em in my area of Indiana is big black leeches and dead chub, especially when the chub has been smushed a little before throwin him out.
 

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Wal John I can't rightly say I've ever actually seen one do it but I'm of the understanding they do. Of course if ya believe the Charmin commercials they also use Charmin afterward. :-D

Flatlander.54 I was just reading an article in a magazine about catfishing and it said January and February are when the biggest cats are caught. Could be but I'm using doing something other than getting on the water when it is that cold.

GB
 

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Amen to that

I know what you mean Graybeard....Im not into the ice fishing thing... :)
Ill wait for spring to come along to start huntin them big channels, blues, and flathead.
 

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I'd say that any flathead caught in cold water, say 40 degrees or lower was snagged, they seem to stop feeding when the water temp drops to that level. The channels like warmer conditions as well, but those big blues stay active and feed all winter.

We don't have too much ice on the big waters here in Oklahoma, and the cat fishers that don't mind the cold weather do catch the big blues right through the winter months.

That's huntin season ain't it?
 
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