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Air Arms precharged pneumatic, .177 with 10.5gr premier pellet. One shot kills of squirrels as far as you may keep them on the head. Will stop them with shoulder shots with complete penetration, but not like central nervous system shots!

BTW, keep your pellets under the sound barrier for utmost accuracy potential!
 

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Yep, RWS Mod.34 with a 2x7 BSA air gun scope.Rabbits,crows and blue jays. 177 cal. If the scope is on it.s lethal!! DP
 

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I agree with D Pete.

I have an RWS Combo. It's a .177 with velocities over 1,000 fps. The scope is an RWS 4x.

I also have shot various birds such as blue jays up to, believe it or not, 90+ yards off of telephone wires. I have also shot squirrels up to about 40 yards.

I would prefer to have a .22 caliber for bigger animals like squirrels and rabbits.

They say that you should use .177 for feathers, and .22 for fur. :grin:

Zachary
 

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I hunt mostly with Careers.

I have the .177 carbine and the .22 rifle. I have shot several groundhogs with them as well as keeping varmints out of the garden. I also hunt some with my Benjamins (one on steroids) and a Crossman 180 from the 1960's.
 

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I shoot a Gamo 880

HI all

I shoot a Gamo 880 with a 3-12x BSA scope on it from Cabelas .177

it shoots consistent pennys at 25+ yards from a support not a bench

I have shot everything from mice to racoons, rabbits you can take through the head/ or a decent shoulder shot but head shots are best
squirrels heads stop them cold, shoulder shots normally need a follow up shot just beacuse we grow some big fox squirrels hp here in mid michigan

yup my best is a 15+lb Michigan 'coon
We were squirrel hunting early this sept ( basically scouting for deer)
and happened along a napping coon uot on a limb about 25 feet up

the 1st shot was just behind the right ear it just stunned the bugger
the 2nd shot was right between the eyes it stung him good cuz he was pawing at his face something fierce, and was wobbling pretty bad up on the limb, the 3rd and final shot was right in the forehead just above the eyes and down he came like a ton of bricks half running down the trunk half falling. He hit the ground ran in a small circle then expired

upon skinning him out
the 1st pellet grazed his skull barley making a mark on the bone
the 2nd caught him square and penetrated through the bone stopping about 2 pellet lenghts in the skull
the 3rd just barley broke the bone and was found at full expansion denting the skull

The pellets were just junk ram-jets gamo pellets not even the hunting pellets i normally shoot

Jamie

PS I dont recommend the .177 as a coon stopper but they are such a problem on our farm i shoot/throw anything i can at them
 

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What would posses some of you guys to shoot a Blue Jay

What would posses some of you guys to shoot a Blue Jay?
If there is a season on them down there, it should be closed?
Stick to the Grackles and Starlings.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i ain't never shot at a bluejay. i only shoot the birds that cause problems like crows and starlings.
 

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Blue jays

If that was how I decided what to sghoot you had better keep your head up and eyes peeled.

Real Sporting Dpete
 

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Chuck

Just checking out the sight. I've hunted with airguns since I was a very young lad. First kill was gopher with a pump Benjamin when I was 6 years old. Been seriously hunting squirrels, rabbits, pesty birds, rats and a few "other" pests since the early '70s. Here's an article I wrote some years back. I have posted it elsewhere so if you've read it sorry for the bother. If not enjoy.

Larry Gibson


“THEY COME AT NIGHT….MOSTLY”

by Larry M. Gibson

That line struck me as odd considering it was noon. I had been watching the bait on the tree the last three mornings and nights. When there would be just enough light to see through the riflescope in the morning. Then again until there wasn’t enough light to see at night. I would give it a full 45 minutes at position in the hide overlooking the bait. I knew they were there. I had seen them, early one morning, and besides the bait kept getting eaten, at night….mostly.

The two I’d seen were young and very skittish. No matter. They were there and that was enough. The unfortunate circumstance was my rifle was down for repair. The parts had been ordered and were on the way. When they arrived the rifle would be repaired and, with the bluff nose bullet, rezeroed. Penetration is a must. The exact distance from the hide to the bait platform was known. Point of impact would match point of aim with certainty. However, this frustrating time of waiting left me with ample time to ponder the situation.

I had done this before, 24 times to be exact. There should be no surprises. Yet thoughts of the many leopard stories from classic books of Africa mingled with thoughts of those times. The sleek silent predator suddenly appearing at the bait. The long tense waits in the hide. Thoughts screaming through your brain so loud you’re sure it will hear. Has it come? Does it know? Can it smell me? ****, can it sense me? Capstick’s aptly descriptive words written in “DEATH IN THE LONG GRASS” were ringing so true. Then, of course, there was the classic line of the little girl in the movie ALIENS; “They come at night … mostly”.

There should have been no surprises. But dammit, it’s noon! And it’s 80 degrees on a hot, humid, lazy summer day. I’m not even hunting. I just happen to glance at the tree. The movement catches my attention. IT is going up the tree and this one is not young. This one is huge, a trophy. The largest I’ve seen. Definitely the one you write home to Mama about! But I’m 5 yards from the hide and the rifle isn’t loaded, how stupid. All I can do is watch and not move. IT reaches the bait, glances around, so quickly the fangs snatch up a piece of bait! Then with all the described silent smoothness of the great predators IT is down the tree and into the dense undergrowth.

I move, picking up the rifle and with a quick practiced movement it is loaded. Climbing into the hide a solid shooting position is taken. Good rest with natural point of aim centered on the bait. Extra ammo’s at hand. Riflescope set at 9X. Focus perfect. Safety’s off. Easy on the trigger … remember it’s two-stage. Everything’s set. Well, except for one …. BREATHE stupid!!! Settle down.

Then the thoughts come with the questions you can’t answer. Will IT return? Was that IT’s first trip to the bait or the last? How hungry was IT? Does IT know?. Why now? Just doesn’t make sense. Seems like when you’ve got the answer to the question, they change the question. Try to stop thinking. Can’t. Where… is … IT?

There! Movement in the undergrowth. Yes, that’s IT and how wary IT is. IT does know. I’m still aimed at the bait. Can’t chance moving the rifle for a shot there, IT will see, must wait. Swiftly IT moves to the base of the tree, hesitates slightly, then with little effort bounds up the backside to the bait. Oh so cautious, IT slinks around between the bait and the feeder then stops on the platform. Crouching low IT stares right at me, no through me! I see the fangs. The twitch of the whiskers. And those eyes. Yes those cold black eyes. They seem to messmerize me. Magnified at 9X I know … IT knows!

But, too late, the crosshairs have settled quartering the right eye. The first stage is out of the trigger and, at a crisp two pounds of pull, so goes the second. The bluff nose strikes precisely at point of aim. IT is slamed down onto the platform, muscles quivering tensely, tail standing straight up in the air. Quick reload for the insurance shot. Wounded in that undergrowth things could prove difficult to sort out. I settle back for the insurance shot if necessary, it isn’t. IT sags, deflating like the last gasp of a fast leaking party balloon. The tail slowly falls to hang limp over the platform.

I turn, still standing in the bathtub and uncock the RWS M54 air rifle. My wife, from the bedroom, says; “Well, did you get it?” I answer rather nonchalantly; “Of course!” Closing the bathroom window, which makes for a rather convenient hide, I look once more down upon the squirrel feeder nailed to the tree 17 yards away. The large Norwegian Wharf Rat lying there is probably the biggest of the 25 killed yet.

As I approach the feeder to confirm the kill (i.e. throwing said rat over the back fence) I see the .22 cal Crossman Premier pellet hit the right eye precisely. Didn’t even cut fur. I lift it off the feeder, using gloves, and hold it up for my wife to see who has safely stayed upstairs in the house. She yells out the window; “Jeez, that sure is a big sucker!” I agree. It measured 14 inches from tip of nose to tip of tail. I then unceremoniously confirm the kill. There are larger rats for sure, but none in my hunting “concession”… so far.

“THEY COME AT NIGHT….MOSTLY” but then …. perhaps not!
 

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Really enjoyed your story. We take our adventures where we can.
I hunt lions in my yard. I sometimes sit for hurs in my lawn chair and shoot dandelion heads. Very good practice for shooting at unknown distances.
 

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I have a Smith & Wesson model 78G target air pistol that I have used for a couple of years and have killed quite a few squirrels with it. I also took it along on prarie dog hunts and shot any that popped up within 25 yards or so. One 22 pellet will stop even big prarie dogs in their tracks if you hit them in the right place. Unfortunately. my eysight is going (you know, over 40) and I'm selling it. See the classifieds if interested.
 

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I use my Crow Magnum IV to control pests around the place like mice, birds, pack rats, raccoons, crows and jack rabbits. Also we hunt small game like brush bunnies, squirrels and turkeys with them. For birds we use wad cutter type pellets as they seem to impart more shock and thus kill better than the hollow point pellets(Crow Magnums) do. For the rest we use hollow points. Took a nice tom turkey last fall at about 40 yards and he didn't go 30 feet after being hit. First one with a air rifle and I'm looking forward to this spring. Lawdog
 

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Great Hunting Story!

LMG,
That was a good hunting story!
I appreciate the fact that you included the make & model of the gun,stating it was scoped, type of pellet, distance to 'IT', and results of the hit! :grin:

That type of information is very important for guys like me that are shopping for a good hunting pellet gun and pellets used effectively on animals in the field!

Have a good day!
Del
 

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im gettin in late- but.......i have a rapid 12/250 and hunt

i hunt every morning before work- i have a few farmers that allow me to shoot piegons, starlings, grackles, crows, turtles, stray cats, prarie dogs, coyotes and other varmin-- and through these relationships i have gained permission to hunt the good stuff- turkeys, deer, ducks, squirrles.
i wish we could post some pics here- you guys have no idea!
im shooting a theoben rapid 12 in .25 cal with a tyrolean stock, moderator, adj butt plate, weaver v-16 with target dot AO and 4 inch ttarget shade, its had a beefed up tune job and will run close to 1050 fps with diana pellets. i like shooting longer distances so i stick to heavy weight kodiack matches for everything but birds and turkeys- i opt for crow mags- those things will expand to .50 to .60 inches with a solid hit inside 30 yds.
ive taken 2 turkeys this year both over 10 inch beards at less than 30 yds. and aside from the ground flopping you get even with shot guns- they fell dead where they stood. ive taken a coyote with 2 shots (1 head and one neck) last fall, and numerous prairie dogs at 50yds +.
anyone like a few pics? i wanna show em off!
 

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Yes, love to hunt with airguns.

I use three different airguns:

* HW30S .22 (Beeman R7) with Simmons WTC 1,5-5x20 for close range and small birds (out to 25 yrds).

* HW80 . 25 with Tasco 2-7 x 32 for close range (out to 30 yrds) larger birds.

* FX2000DL .22 with Bushnell Banner 4-12 x 40 for long range (30-60 yrds) hunting.

The 25 is great for hunting, hits like a big rig truck...

:twisted:
 

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Air gun hunting

I do alot of hunting with air rifles almost use them exclusivly. You can find so many more places to hunt when you are using air-power. So far since I got my new rife a .22 talon SS with a BSA 6-24 adjustable objective mildot and elumidated recticle I have shot over 215 starlings and grackels in my backyard. This does not include all the other vermin including pigeons, prarie dogs, squrrels and turtles that I shoot. Well have fun and shoot one for me.
 

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prarie dogs down

shot a few prarie dogs today- wish i was off work so i could go back tommorow. all with my rapid- i need a gun that shoots 100 times off one fill!
 
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