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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a huge old cast iron canning cooker. Melted 150 pounds of lead in it last weekend. Less than half full. My problem is my two rcbs ingot molds heat up and then the ingots take too darn long to cool. Spent a couple hours making ingots and watching my propane bottle go down just keeping the lead liquid. Anyone make their own ingot molds? I need the ingots to fit in the Lee casting pots. Muffin tins don't work. Messed up two of them tinny buggers trying. Don't want corn cobs from the corn bread molds. Can't seem to find anything else to knock out a few hundred pounds an hour. I want to be able to stack or box the ingots. I have several hundred pounds cast up at a time. The pot will melt it, Just need something to put it in to form the ingots.

Steve :roll:
 

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They make cast iron muffin pans. That's what I use. Works great.

Mine is an old one, but Lodge makes something they call the straight side muffin pan in cast iron. Sells for about $12.

I'm not gonna put much effort into making something I can buy cheap.
 

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hot ingot molds

I have resorted to turning the ingot molds upside down and cooling them with a spray from a water hose to cool them. Just don't get them to cool or get any water on the inside after they are cool. Wes
 

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hot ingot molds

I have resorted to turning the ingot molds upside down and cooling them with a spray from a water hose to cool them. Just don't get them to cool or get any water on the inside after they are cool. Wes
 

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The Antimony Man has what looks like a fine one. Casts eleven half cylinders weighing 1.5 pounds at a go and he wants $26 for it.
 

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If you can weld or have a friend that does you can use angle iron, cut to the length and use the size you want ^^^^ use the non welded ^ and use angle or flat bar for the sides, BUT make it to big and it IS HEAVY
 

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Use aluminum muffin pans without seams

I pour my lead into muffin pans, making sure I don't fill each cavity too full. I try to make them no more than 1/2 full so the ingots fit into my Lee production pot easily.

Be sure to find muffin pans without any seams. If they have seams, the lead gets hung up and the only way to get the ingots out is to destroy the pan. I buy seamless aluminum muffin pans at Good Will and other thrift stores for about $1.50 to $2.00 each. Buy lots of them. The ones with a non-stick coating are best if you can find them.

Also be careful not to dent the muffin pans. Dents can make the ingots hard to get out.

I partially fill each cavity in the pan and let them cool a fairly long time. I then grab them with gloves and flip them upside down on a piece of plywood. If you have lots of pans, you can let them cool a bit longer before flipping them over.

Jon
 

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A friend of mine does sand casts of brass parts for muzzleloaders and sailboats, I saw how he made his parts and stole one method that for making ingots. I use a pan filled with cat litter, make the ingots the size I want shaped out of aluminum foil and push them into the cat litter and then pour the ingots, when all the foil ingots are hardened, pull them out and reline the litter with more foil. This is a very good way to pour lots of ingots very quickly. You can probably substitute sand for the ingots as that is what my friend uses with his brass. I have quite a bit of cat litter around so it works for me.

regards,
Graycg
 

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I use a stack of ~5 red shop towels that are sopping wet to cool the molds down, works well enough with a pair of ingot molds, but I've never had more then 30-40 lbs at a time being turned into ingots.

If I had 100+ lbs to turn into ingots, I'd weld up some 1 1/2" angle iron as the other posted showed to make triangle shaped ingots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Lots of good suggestions. Thanks.
Went to 20 some goodwill stores one weekend. O cast pans or muffin pans. Been thinking on the angle iron home built one. Was worring about getting the welds clean enough so the ingots didn't stick.

Don't know who the Antimony Man is.

Looks like I might be welding something up. Have a session coming up with ingots, down rigger balls, and halibut weights. Will be a casting fool for a day or two.

Thanks again.

Steve :D
 

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John Traveller,
Between the Cat litter in this thread and toilet bowl wax rings in another it could get really stinky around here!!!

regards,
Graycg.
 

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Ha Ha....

I am only making small quantities of bullets, but of course, trying to melt WW and pour them straight into the mold can get a little dirty with slag. I went into the junk shop today and found an aluminum meat tenderizer, and the sides are hollow. It worked excellent, wonderful little ingots without any slag. I am using little cast iron frying pans for melting. They are sold as ashtrays for camping and have an excellent pouring lip where the cigarette is supposed to sit.
 

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Steve P

I use the top of GI mess kits. Each side makes a 3 - 3 1/2 lb ingot. 6+ lbs per lid (2 ingots). I use 3 of them as I use a 20 lb pot (cast iron dutch oven) on propane burner. They cool pretty quick and I use pliers to grasp them and turn them over so the still hot but solid ingots cool on the driveway. You should be able to find some in surplus stores or second hand stores. They are not issue anymore so they should be available. The ingots fit fine in most furnaces.

Larry Gibson
 

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I use the soda can method myself. I just don't peel the aluminum until I am ready to melt them down. They are very handy to store too.
 

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http://aolsearch.aol.com/redir?src=...URN=http://www.theantimonyman.com/furnace.htm

Go to pricing, then ingot moulds. He does not have pictures, but I once ran across one of the half round ones in an "antique" store. They had it priced as an antique or I would have bought it. It may even have been an antique. Some cast iron patterns have been unchanged for 100 years. Anyway, it's a half cylinder about 1.5" x 5" or 6".
 
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