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I have a Nikon 6-18 buckmaster. It's got the regular crosshairs and it's a really great scope. I am starting to get into shooting it at different distances and I'd like to use the target knobs that came with the scope in the box. Right now, if you unscrew the protective caps you can easily adjust the knobs with your fingers, but I'd like to use the actual target knobs because that's more of what they were made for.

Does anyone else have a Nikon that they use the target knobs on? I'm not really sure how they're supposed to work so who knows.
 

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The target knobs work exactly like the knobs that are on there now except the caps won't fit over them. The allen screw on top of the knob is all that holds it on, they're very easy to change.
 

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how do you use the target knobs, such as zeroing the knobs after the scope is zeroed with the bullets. I assume you are supposed to be able to add and remove elevation with these. I see there are lines that indicate how much movement was made.
 

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Wow, this is an oldie, but a goodie.

To update: I have since sold this scope and replaced it with a 4.5-14 buckmaster mil-dot.

As far as using the target knobs. I tried it out and didn't see much advantage to them. After I switched them I just thought it was too easy to bump them or move them out of where they were supposed to be. To zero the knobs on a nikon first get your rifle zeroed to where you want it to be. Then, remove the allen screw, pull the knob off and put it back on so that the zero line is lined up on the scope. Does that kinda make sense the way I explained it? You're just removing the knob, rotating it and putting it back on is all.
 

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teddy12b said:
After I switched them I just thought it was too easy to bump them or move them out of where they were supposed to be.
Or get your rifle to fit back in the gun cabinet...
 

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The more I thought about it after switching to the target knobs, the more I just didn't like them or see the advantage to them. You can do the exact same thing with the regular knobs, except when you're done adjusting your scope you can cover up the knobs and protect them. I think most target knobs are for the "looks cool" factor. Nothing against them, it's just a preference thing.
 

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Can someone explain some basics for me?

I looked into a new 6-18 buckmaster box and there were 2 extra knobs and a sunscreen included. The knobs on the scope were smaller diameter than the ones in the box. Is there any other difference between these, and are the larger diameter knobs the ones typically called "target turrets".

I like the turrets that are able to store a "starting point", are both of the Nikon knobs able to do this? I did not find the standard knob diameter to be too small, it seems like the larger diameter ones (if that is all the bring to the table) are a solution to a problem that does not exist.

Loosening the allen screw, does this allow you to just turn the knob freely, or can you also return the knob down if you turned it many turns to get to your zero position?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
bajabill said:
Can someone explain some basics for me?

I looked into a new 6-18 buckmaster box and there were 2 extra knobs and a sunscreen included. The knobs on the scope were smaller diameter than the ones in the box. Is there any other difference between these, and are the larger diameter knobs the ones typically called "target turrets".

I like the turrets that are able to store a "starting point", are both of the Nikon knobs able to do this? I did not find the standard knob diameter to be too small, it seems like the larger diameter ones (if that is all the bring to the table) are a solution to a problem that does not exist.

Loosening the allen screw, does this allow you to just turn the knob freely, or can you also return the knob down if you turned it many turns to get to your zero position?

Those target knobs don't do anything for you that the regular knobs won't do. They're just bigger and then it's a preference thing if you like that or not.

Sight in your rifle where you want it to be at. Remove the knobs and rotate them until the zero is lined up with the little line on the scope. Then you'll make life easier making adjustments for shooting different distances and in different winds.

Does that help?
 

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yes, but let me continue for clarification.

If I zero the gun, adjust the knob to the zero line and zero hashmark. Then I get another bullet weight that shoots 5 inches higher. How do I lower the point of impact without removing the allen screw again?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You don't.

When you change your ammo, you also changed your zero. You can only have your scope zeroed for one kind of ammo at a time. Not saying you still can't adjust your scope to play around with different ammo, but the zero will line up with whatever single ammo you set it up with.

On my rifle I have my go-to handload and that's what the scope is zeroed to. Sometimes I play with different ammo and rather than go through the process of removing the cap & rotating it, I just do the math.

The best thing to do is find out what ammo you want to shoot and that your rifle likes, then set the scope knobs to be zeroed for that ammo.
 

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Target knobs are for when you are constantly changing your zero. For instance if you are shooting match at 300 yards and 600 yards. You will have your zero at 300 yards and "dial in" for 600 yards. Or if your a varmint hunter and you are shooting at different ranges - instead of hold over you crank in your hold over by how many clicks it takes to zero at the distance you want to shoot at. For instance - if you are shooting a .223 and you are zeroed at 200 yards and you are now shooting at 350 yards you would dial in some where around 50 "clicks" (14" of drop) depending on your velocity and bullet coefficient. You need to shoot your rifle at these different distances to determine exactly how many "clicks" you need to dial in. If you are one to zero your rifle and leave it where she sets, target knobs are not for you. Good Luck and Good Shooting
 

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I also have a Buckmasters. Mine is the 6-18x mil-dot. I specifically wanted this optic since the mil-dot subtensions (measurements) are calibrated for a power less than the highest, and the side parallax is also very nice to have. Besides that, it's a great optic for the $.

Either of those turret systems are referred to as "target turrets". If u feel better with a turret cap then use the straight style, If u think the tapered look cooler, then use those, but the caps won't fit over them--obviously.

Mine goes on a 17 Fireball XP-100 during the summer for prairie dog shooting. I dial elevation and use the mil-dots at 18x for a subtension of 2.4 inch per hundred yds. for windage reference and rangefinding. The turret is cald. for 1/8th INCH PER HUNDRED YARDS (IPHY). Each numbered mark on the turret is 1 IPHY.

Now once u get zeroed for your load (adjust the turret to zero by loosening the screw in the top of the turret), run a ballistics program ( http://www.eskimo.com/~jbm/cgi-bin/jbmtraj-5.0.cgi )for your zero and calculate bullet drop (and windage) in IPHY, and print it out. Now if i range a prairie dog for 400 yds. in a 5mph wind from 3 oclock, the ballistics program tells me i need 4.5 IPHY of elevation and 2.2 IPHY of windage reference. Elevation is easy--just run the turret to 4.5 IPHY and i'm set. I've already calculated the 10 mph windage reference (5.75 IPHY) for my 2.4 IPHY mil-dots which is 5.75/2.4=2.4 mil-dots windage (5 mph is 1/2 that so aim right 1.2 mil-dots). See how it works? With this kinduva' system 1st shot connections can be made at distances that will surprise your buddies, and yourself probably--believe me.

Of course all should be tested at the range 1st before using it on game. With this system we have made 1st shot connections on PD's at beyond 500 yds. in some wind even with the lowly (BC-wise) 25 Hornady HP.
 
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