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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i was curious as if these sheep are just farm animals i now you can get pretty close to them without them runnng off.
Are they the same as texas dall???
 

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Are they just barn yard farm animals?

Hmm. Let's see now how can I put this diplomatically? Wal yeah they really are.

Are they same as TX Dall?

Nope.

GB
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks grabeard

thanks for your lp i sue kno alot of people passing these off as xotics to hunt guess it would be pretty xciting to a kid if they did not know they were farm animals but in uvalde i hnted them and they re are pretty evasive animals thanks again
 

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Howie,

Any animal depending upon the environment in which it was raised can behave and act like a “wild” animal. I have hunted ranches where the various Corsican species, i.e. Texas Dall, Black Hawaiian, Painted Desert, etc. were as wild and wary as any elk or whitetail are expected to be and had very little interaction with humans. I have also hunted ranches where they came running at the sound of the truck and would almost knock you down as they tried to crowd in for the anticipated meal. It turned out that the rancher used the same truck he fed from for hunting. Just do your research and ask a lot of questions as to how the operation is run, how the animals are treated and handled before you lay down your greenbacks. Then pick the hunting scenario that meets your needs the best. Good luck and happy hunting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the advice

i have encounered both of those scenarios and you are right about the same truck being used but what is funny if you was to try and walk up on them they will let you get about 100 yards and run I think it would be a great hunt for a kids first xotic thanks again
 

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Howie,

I agree with you about exotic rams being a good "first" animal for kids. If you will look at some of my other posts in this section about the youth hunts I host each year you will find that rams and does are the animals we have chosen to offer these youngsters. Many times we can turn a "boring" ram hunt for an adult into an exciting adventure for youngsters. By belly crawling through cedar and mesquite trees and up or down ravines and over rocks the youngsters get a chance to experience the stalking portion of hunting on an animal that is fairly easy to hunt. This makes the harvesting their trophy that much more ejoyable for them. Happy hunting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
To Denvas

you are right i have been doing that myself sneaking up on them luckily i have the oppurtunity to get t go and enjoy the animals but i know when i put the corn out those barbadoes come running, and like you i have been takig ids out to hunt also not on the scale you do, but wth my resources i am lucky to be able to do it. the best times of my life have been showing my daughters and other kids nature lol i ma still learning myself. i have read all of your posts on here and you have actually helped me on advice as i just killed my first Sika back in January what rifles are these kids using?? i have a couple but generally we use 30-30s i have an ld savage 840 bolt action and a marlin that are scaled down to a more useful sze for youngsters well thanks for our replies and advice
 

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Howie,

As far as the caliber of the rifles the kids on my sponsored hunts use, well it depends on the type of hunt. Depending upon the ranch and event sponsors we offer modern arm, muzzleloader and shotgun hunts. For any of these hunts the kids have a choice of bringing their own firearm or using one that I or one of my volunteers supply. What we try to do is make sure that the firearm used matches the youngster’s shooting capabilities. After all, even the biggest, toughest 18 year old football players are sometimes recoil sensitive. Usually the calibers that we supply for modern arms run the gambit from .223, 6.5mm, .243, .7mm-08, .308 and .30-30. We also try to take into account the animal to be harvested and the terrain to be hunted. The worst thing that can happen is for the parent to bring an 85 lb. 12 year old young lady to a hunt with dad’s .338 magnum. If you have read my posts then you know that we always try to have some type of shooting exercise so that we can watch the youngsters shoot their chosen firearms before the hunting begins. This is when we can determine if some type of change in firearm needs to be made because, after all, our main goal is to provide an enjoyable and educational experience, not one in which they get scope bit or knocked about by heavy recoil. This would only cause them to want to quit hunting before they learned to enjoy it.

As with the modern arm hunts, for the muzzleloading hunts the youngsters can bring their own gun our use one of ours. We have both .45 and .50 caliber guns available in both traditional and various inline configurations. When we are limited by the landowner to the use of shotguns we can provide them with either a .20 or 12. gauge model. (Yes, some ranchers do require that we only use shotguns on their ranches. This can really make for interesting hunts as, even though most shotgun slugs can have the same effective range as some muzzleloading rifles, most people in my part of the country are just not used to using a shotgun for big game.

Hopefully this information will answer your question. If you ever need any more information of ideas please let me know.
 

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Youth N Exotics

I used to take my sons deer hunting with me and unfortunately the piney woods we hunted were buck only, and we seemed only to see does if anything when I took them. As a result they became bored with hunting. I really wanted them to enjoy hunting, and know that sometimes, you actually bag an animal! Anyway, I took the entire family on a ram hunt years ago. It was not the hardest hunt around, but it wasn't a turkey shoot under a feeder either. Both of my boys bagged a nice ram with one shot from their .243, one fired from the truck (he was young back then) and the other stalked in with me, from cedar to cedar tree, making a great shot at medium distance.

They have each shot their first whitetail since then, but the easier exotic hunt rejuvenated their interest in hunting. Now I hope to take my wife for exotic does at the place Howie mentioned, sometime soon. I like the way denvas has the kids earn their animal, even if it is an animal that is not very hard to hunt. I think they appreciate it much more that way, and have a better memory too.
markc
 
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