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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently found this model of the Armstrong 100 Ton Gun. It appears to be a crude version of a very nicely made armourer’s model. The trunnions are screws. It is .22 calibr, but I would not fire it.

The carriage is not anything like the Seacoast mounts in Gibraltar or Malta and certainly would not have looked like a naval carriage these would have been mounted on in the Italian battleships.

This tube has a cascabel which the Seacoast versions did not have as the electric firing mechanism was inserted in the rear center of the breech. An interesting side note, the drawings for this gun show a cascabel as do many of the news articles of the time showing the Italian guns being shipped to Italy. I wonder if the naval version of this tube had the cascabel whereas the seacoast version did not. None of the Italian tubes remain, so maybe this remains a mystery.

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I decided to see if I could create a seacoast carriage and slide that would better fit this tube. It is a work in progress. Also pictured is another model used to compare and scale.
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Slow going
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
More progress
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I saw that for sale too!!! Seriously considered it but it was hard to tell what the quality was from the pictures.... should make for a wonderful piece!!!
 

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I was wondering if maybe you bought this on e-bay - I was the first "buyer", based on the sellers image of the 19th century model that we both know well. I hopefully (stupidly?) assumed that it was a miniature version of that much larger model. What a find for the price - an exact 19th century duplicate in .22 caliber!?!

I had my doubts, but for the price I could not pass it up, and if it was a fraud, I could get my money back from e-bay.

Next day, I checked the sellers listings again, and saw that yet another one had been sold! Same photos. This immediately raised alarms. The photos looked familiar. I soon found the exact same photos (2) from an auction some years back, of one of the large 19th century models.

Of course, I contacted the seller with these facts, and he was soon forced to admit that what he was planning to send me was only a model based on those photos, and the first one was not even finished yet! Of course I was very unhappy, to say the least, and asked for an immediate refund, but also asked for photos of whatever he was making. I assume that you have the only one, but maybe he made a second one (?).

Overall, it was better than I expected - with the carriage of course being a replica of the 19th century model, which also had the same cascabel detail that the large 19th century models had (but the final versions did not). I have to say that it is a fine effort considering that he made it solely based on those two photos. He did not even know that it was the 100 ton Armstrong, and thought it was one of the Civil War Armstrongs.

I thought about offering him a lesser price for it, but I am glad that you ultimately got it (for less). All things considered it isn't a bad model for the size (including the carriage).

Anyway, for me it was a lesson in "if it seems too good to be true, it probably is"..... Will look forward to seeing how your carriage project progresses (or, ask Dom if he could whip one up out of steel, complete with the lower chassis?). I might consider buying one myself if he ends up making any more of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You must of scarred him Greg! I made an offer for a good bit under his asking price. He came back a little higher and the deal was made. The trunnions are the biggest disappointment as they are machine screws. I may try to fill the slots with epoxy and make them look better. There is a vent drilled on top vice the rear. I’ll flip it over so this does not show.

I am undecided on trimming off the cascabel.

I wonder if the naval/Italian versions had the cascabel on them and the Seacoast versions did not. All the drawings show a cascabel through which there is a vent. Many of the illustrations showing the guns being moved show the cascabel and it being used as an anchor point for ropes. Maybe the naval version had a cascabel that was used somehow in the naval turret. Be interested in hearing your thoughts.

BTW, I think he has made another one. I saw a listing on eBay a few weeks ago, the price was much higher though.

Started working on the I beams that make up the sides of the slide or chassis this evening.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Drawing with cascabel I forgot to post
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Regarding the cascabel, since it screws in, maybe it was used for some intermittent purpose like transportation, and then removed.
 

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The illustration of the damaged Duilio gun (see post on the 100 ton animation video) clearly does not show any cascabel, but who knows exactly how accurate that really is. I would doubt that any cascabel would be used with ropes in the tight spaces on the battleships, especially considering the size of the barrel. But the drawing that you posted does seem to show that the cascabel shown has a threaded attachment. We had some discussion a while back about the "function of the octagon", and I thought at the time that it might have some function as an anchoring point during transport, in addition to its obvious function as a port to the vent. The latter was fully explained by the video animation, but I guess it is possible that there might have been a separate, screw-in cascabel used only during transport. Or, the cascabel shown in the drawing, and incorporated into the 19th century models, is (like the carriage), merely a relic of an earlier design scheme based on many other previous Armstrong designs. And both the drawing and the models were created before the ultimate design was finalized?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I guess we may never fully know, but a removable cascabel to help anchor the breech while loading and unloading/ moving the tube does make some sense as you would not want 100 tons of iron and steel swinging about.

I think the two indentations around the largest part of the tube were where straps were place to secure the tube during transport and may have been used in a similar fashion to help secure the tube into it naval carriage or attach it to the elevation mechanism.

A few more pictures and illustrations showing a cascabel being used to secure ropes and a few with no cascabel while the gun was in transit. If only I could travel back in time!
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
A little more progress
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