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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a 35 rem barrel , when I installed it on the frame the barrel seems to close but it does not latch. I have read through the barrel fitting sticky and I'm not sure if it needs a little more off the pivot point or if the latch shelf needs some fitting. What would be the best way to determine this. Thanks
 

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Do you have more than one receiver? (try another). Did you have the forend off and try it? With the forend on did you try to close it with authority (snapping it shut) not to be done with a scope mounted.
 

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Brian56, the previous Remington/H&R gunsmith, told me to never, ever take anything off the latch shelf (especially with a Dremel :-[). Pivot pin notch is where he said to make my adjustments by adding a shim or slowly filing away metal (with a file, again, not a Dremel). ;D

Thanks, Dinny
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Dinny, I was thinking that after reading the pinned post , but wasn't real sure. I'll try to maybe take a bit off it's pretty tight so I doubt a shim is the answer. it looks like in comparing with the other barrel it may not be going down enough, it is about flush with the top of the frame and the other barrel drops slightly lower or below flush. Is this typical of needing to take a little off the pivot?
 

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I think so, but without seeing it I can't really say. Go slow with a round file and you should be able to see the difference it makes. I think the size file you want is real close to 3/8" in diameter.

Thanks, Dinny
 

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The pivot pin notch is exactly 3/8 (.375). Be careful to keep the notch square. If you have a friend with a milling machine have him use a 3/8th end mill and cut it back a couple of thousandths at a time until it closes properly. Needless to say, go slow, I've ruined a couple of stubs by getting in a hurry and taking too much off at a time. From your description, I'd guess you are within .002 to .006 of being right on.
 

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WLB is spot on about using the end mill and Dinny is also correct about the dremel. for a file see if you can find a chain saw file seems like Tim posted about using one some time ago.Another option is find a round sharpening rod the correct size.Still another option is to get a 3/8 cylindercal stone for a dremel and use it by HAND[/color], just rub it back and forth till the receiver locks up. Take you time and go slow.
Happy Trails
George
 

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If you can find something that will fit the notch with sandpaper wrapped around it, a drill bit, a wooden dowel, a piece of rod stock, you can use that to sand the notch slowly. Just remember to keep it square to the notch. If its not square and take too much off one side, you get one side too short. This means it still won't fit because the other side is longer, so you will take it back off and keep sanding and possibly make the short side shorter. I would suggest measuring the length of the lug at the bottom of the notch with a dial calipers before you start and check that measurement often. So go slow and check often. If you think you are possibly not square check the measurements on each side.

BW

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm in my blind at the moment, when I get home I'll see what I have to fit the notch. I appreciate the input, I wasn't sure where to start even after reading the barrel fitting thread. I'll update later, thanks
 

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Or file it with the dremel turned off. :p
 

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As this is a rimless cartridge check how deep a loaded round goes into the well cleaned, dry chamber. It should be only a tiny smidge below the breech face. If it is deeper than that you need to determine just how much.
The reason is that a too deeply cut chamber can be addressed now before fitting. If this is the case you can carefully file the breech face first going for fit rather than the hinge hook (going slow and checking barrel fit to action often). Once you get to the cartridge sitting slightly below the breech face if the barrel is still shy of lockup is when you switch to the hinge hook.
The top of the barrel will be below the top of the action when it is getting close to fit. If you have some primed, unloaded brass that would be the time to start checking where the firing pin strike is on the primer. It is a balancing act between getting to lockup and centered primer strikes It will do you no good to get it to lock up and find that it is too off center for ignition.
Err on the side of just getting lock up (ie, a 'tight fitted breech') as they do wear and settle in from recoil. If the primer strikes are reasonably centered shoot it (have the latch clean and dry, close with some authority) and see if you get any pop opens. If you do, give the hinge hook a couple more light strokes and try again. This is the place where slow and easy is your friend. Watch for pop opens, make sure the primer strikes are not getting too far off center and stop when it is staying together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You guys are practically wizards, I did as prescribed slowly a little at a time and have a lock up that you cannot remove a piece of aluminum foil from. the 35 rem cartridge sits almost even with the breech maybe ever so slightly below. Primer strike was dead center. I have my 1.8" brass cut and neck sized, loaded to the low end of the Lee handboock on 2015 powder 200 grain jsp load data, slightly under max oal ready to dial in a sweet Indiana legal deer gun tomorrow after morning hunt. Bore sighted and laser sighted it should be a quick dial in to get to minute of deer. Going to be the Wife's gun when she hunts , the boy's when she don't. Thanks for the great advice and I will follow up from the range
 
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