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Okay, I looked at at post 46 again and they are solid wood, first glance I thought they were plywood. , All the more reason to have a bolted through trunnion plate as well as caps squares. Especially since this is a softwood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Thanks to all for the advice - lm a novice at this and the advice and guidance is appreciated!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Any advice on best way to bend trunion caps? I'm thinking put the side to be bent in vice, put piece of steel same diameter as trunion in the rounded out section and gently hammer to desired bend. Any better ideas welcome!
 

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You can cold form them with dies in a hydraulic press, you can hot forge them with hammer and anvil or dies, you can machine the loops from tubing and weld the flats onto them. Depends what you have available.

Using a vise as a press risks breaking the vise.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
You can cold form them with dies in a hydraulic press, you can hot forge them with hammer and anvil or dies, you can machine the loops from tubing and weld the flats onto them. Depends what you have available.

Using a vise as a press risks breaking the vise.
Thanks. Will probably
 

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Discussion Starter · #68 ·
Its getting there. Need to sand the grove in axle tree just a bit for half inch steel rod to fit
252722
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 · (Edited)
Cross bolts are 5 inch long 1/4-20. Six 1/4 ID x 1/2 inch thick x 3/4 inch long steel spacers fit perfectly between the cheeks and trail
252724
 

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You are definitely headed in the right direction there.

Rondelles are more like a thick double step flanged washer. The steps goes in the cross bolt hole, the large diameter flange seats against the wood like a washer. The step keeps the bolt from bearing-rubbing against the wood of the through hole and the flange gives a larger compression bearing surface between the cheek and carriage when the bolt is tightened. It will also strengthen the joint to resist rotational forces from the pitch up of recoil, as well as torque and twist from traveling over rough terrain.

Since you probably won't be hooking up your team and going on Road marches, I don't thing you need to worry about problems in that direction. Since your gun is .75 caliber, I don't think you will get much rotational stress. After firing the gun a few time check this joint for loose rondelles, wood compression and hole elongation. I doubt there will be a problem.

You are making some good progress here. Looking forward to to your smoke and fire pictures.
 

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You are definitely headed in the right direction there.

Rondelles are more like a thick double step flanged washer. The steps goes in the cross bolt hole, the large diameter flange seats against the wood like a washer. The step keeps the bolt from bearing-rubbing against the wood of the through hole and the flange gives a larger compression bearing surface between the cheek and carriage when the bolt is tightened. It will also strengthen the joint to resist rotational forces from the pitch up of recoil, as well as torque and twist from traveling over rough terrain.

Since you probably won't be hooking up your team and going on Road marches, I don't thing you need to worry about problems in that direction. Since your gun is .75 caliber, I don't think you will get much rotational stress. After firing the gun a few time check this joint for loose rondelles, wood compression and hole elongation. I doubt there will be a problem.

You are making some good progress here. Looking forward to to your smoke and fire pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #73 ·
You are definitely headed in the right direction there.

Rondelles are more like a thick double step flanged washer. The steps goes in the cross bolt hole, the large diameter flange seats against the wood like a washer. The step keeps the bolt from bearing-rubbing against the wood of the through hole and the flange gives a larger compression bearing surface between the cheek and carriage when the bolt is tightened. It will also strengthen the joint to resist rotational forces from the pitch up of recoil, as well as torque and twist from traveling over rough terrain.

Since you probably won't be hooking up your team and going on Road marches, I don't thing you need to worry about problems in that direction. Since your gun is .75 caliber, I don't think you will get much rotational stress. After firing the gun a few time check this joint for loose rondelles, wood compression and hole elongation. I doubt there will be a problem.

You are making some good progress here. Looking forward to to your smoke and fire pictures.
Thank you sir for all the advice along the way. Without the plans you generously shared, l would not have gotten anywhere near where l am now. I cant thank you and others who have chimed in with advice enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Plans call for one 1/8 inch screw through axle tree into axle. I'm thinking about putting two in, one on each side of trail as well as epoxying the axle rod in the entire length of the axle tree.
 

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The only reason I can see to not epoxy is that it would complicate future repairs. I my self wouldn't do it. .

The Green plans lack the details of the AOP plans. But they are just fine for model building. I have a number of the Green Plans for other guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
The Green plans really helped me. All the dimensions are correct. The only difference l have is the barrel is thicker in scale in regards to length, which safety wise is a good thing. Just means the cheeks sit a little farther apart on the axle tree, with almost 1 inch clearance per side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Forgive me...l have sinned. Not having access to tooling to make wheels, I bought a pair of 10 inch 12 spoke wheels....
 
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