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Discussion Starter #1
I've been doing some serious looking here of late...at some pretty impressive looking rifles.These are 2 that have caught my eye...both...in .177 caliber.Due to some pretty restrictive local ordinances...and also due to my lovely wife's insistence that the majority of furry little critters residing on my property be let alone :x ...So...that has put a whole different spin on things for my air gun search....and I have had to try to figure out which way to go here.Instead of of good hunting/plinking gun...to more along a very accurate but somewhat quite target type.

I insist upon them being accurate..relatively quite..and really good looking...giving a good return on my money spent.I've been shooting centerfire rifles..and Trap shooting most of my life...and a full type stock is very appealing to me...also the ability to fully adjust the comb hight and pitch & angle of the stock allows me to have a better fit over off the shelf standard stocks...not that I need it on every rifle or shotgun I have owned...but atleast on my competition shotguns and a couple of rifles I have had...has helped me do much better..

Since having a long discussion with the better half...it looks like a .177 will suffice to do what I can do here for the occasional tree rat...or starlings that raids the bird feeders..and perhaps a chipmunk or two...these she really don't care for...but the rest are verboten[/color]

Both of these rifles cost a-lot more than what I had anticipated spending on one...and I will be trading a bolt centerfire to aquire one...I expect to spend somewhere around $500.00-$600 for just the rifle...my scope is being purchased for a Fathers day gift...

The Beeman is set up real nice for adjusments...and has been given real good reviews ...so too is the Air Arms TX200...and with the Walnut stock that is available for it...makes it one good looking rig...

Here's the Beeman..

it's review..http://www.straightshooters.com/ourtake/otr11.html

Here's the TX 200 MK 111



it's review http://www.straightshooters.com/ourtake/ottx200.html

What your guys spin on these 2...are they worth the money???

Mac
 

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While I don't own a R-11 I do own a Air Arms TX200 MK3. I do own a Beeman R-10 though. Personally I don't care for adjustable stocks on sporting rifles. For target use they're fine. I would give the power edge to the TX200 as well as being a bit more quiet(it comes with a built in sound moderator. In fact my TX200 is more accurate than my R-10. Air Arms rifles are known for their accuracy. Which one would be best for you, toss a coin. Both are excellent rifles and well worth the money. Lawdog
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Both guns are about equal in performance, both are extremely accurate, but the R-11 has that Rekord trigger. In case you've never handled a TX, its a BIG gun. Just under 10 pounds without a scope, its about equal to the RWS 54. The R11 at a bit over 8 pounds is a bit easier to shoot off hand, but its looong. I have the R-10 in .177, which is basically the same action with an adjustable stock and sleeved barrel. Its shoots 930 or so, 850+- with 10.5gr heavy pellets. The R-11 should be close to that out of the box.
If you're upping the ante from 250 to nearer 600 $$$, and are willing to deal with a 10 lb gun, the RWS 54 is something to look at also. Its at least as powerfull as the others, maybe a bit more. Its as accurate as the others, and is recoilless, unlike the others. My 54 is in .22, shoots well over 800, and will drill squirrels easily at 70+ yards. It doesn't have the fancy adjustable stock or Rekord trigger, but its built like a Tiger tank.
I've got a whole cabinet full of guns of every size, weight and power.The powerful guns look and feel impressive, and make a good show for those who've never seen them in action. However, I find that the heavy howitzers tend to stay in the closet more than the light ones when its time to defend the feeders. You really don't need 900+ fps for picking starlings and squirrels off the birdfeeder, especially if its not more than 20 or 30 yards away. A 45" 10 pound gun is a bit unwieldy when trying to nail a squirrel from the window or rushing a shot on a starling. These big powerhouses need slow deliberate aiming, and a bit of effort is involved. I find that a small light gun is much preferable. I use my 12fpe .22 Xocet more than anything lately. Its just the right size (39", 8 lbs with scope), its light, quick, easy to shoot, and very very accurate. I can easily shoot 3/8" or smaller groups at 30 yards with it. In .22 its shooting Silverbears at 670 or so, more than enough for squirrels.
On another note, you might want to look for a used FWB124. Theres one on Brads classifieds, a nice one too.
http://www.airguns.net/classifieds/classifieds_body.html
I have 2, another due in a day or so. This is the gun that defined the sporting air rifle. The 124 has a reputation of almost mythical proportions, and a large following among both shooters and collectors. Its about the best quality spring gun around. The 124 is .177 only. Of the 2 I have, one shoots at about 820, one at about 930. Factory guns shoot about 800 give or take. What is remarkable is that cocking effort is on the order of 20 lbs or less. Even if the gun needs a spring or seal its absolutely worth it. There plenty of upgrades available- springs, seals, stocks, triggers etc should you decide to go that way.
But then again, theres always that nice R-9 Deluxe...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
dave:

The anti is being upped...since I'm trading in a bolt action centerfire. and unfortunately my gunshop isn't a full fledge air gun shop...they have a limited supply...and seem to think that the GAMO rifles are ok...just because they haven't had to return many of them........and no.your right.....I really don't want to deal with a 10 lb+ gun...but I do want one that is capable of doing extremely well for field tournaments...should I decide ever to participate in one...hence my interest in the RX-11...and it's target type stock configuration...

My needs are probably more than most beginners...and... I do want a better grade rifle...and again...accuracy is a major priority....and the reason I asked for a comparison between the 2 is from what I have seen posted on different field tournaments...and the TX 200 has placed more often...than any of the Beeman rifles...again...I'm only going by what I've seen posted...since I have no real world knowledge on the matter...but one thing I am...is a fast learner...and I usually immerse myself in the subject before participating in it...this way I do have a little understanding of what I'm dealing with...and I do understand about the trigger...so...I'll be checking in the morning how much the Beeman will set me back...

As to purchasing a used rifle...for the time being...I'll stick with a new gun. for now...even though the used ones on the link would probably work for me..only since I'm not well versed in seeing if something is amiss with the used one...and since I'm working a trade at my gun dealers...it is more practical for me to do this...but Thank You for the link to the used ones for sale...and once I've gained a little confidence in the matter...be assured I'll probably be seeking out good deals on the used market..

Now...as to the up close shots...yes I know I don't need a 900 fps+ rifle...but I sure as heck don't want a piece of junk either...that I have to spend $150-$300 for a miracle tune-up to make it preform right...I would rather just spend the money the first time...and get something I can admire because 1...it is a good looking rifle...and 2... it's performance matches it's good looks...I'm kinda funny that way.....and since I don't have several different rifles to use sitting in my safe to choose from to use...and....this is my first purchase in over 40 years of a pellet gun...I figured I would try to get the best of all worlds if possible...and from the short time I've been researching this..I've come to the conclusion that I'm going to have to spend a considerable amount more than I had originally anticipated to fulfill my want list..This is the reasons I have asked about the specific models...they look from the reports I've seen... to do just that.....I'm not meaning any disrespect here...because I know how it is to be on the receiving end of so-many questions..but..it seems..a lot of you guys that have been at this for years...and have several different rifles to shoot for different events tend to forget that not everyone has so-many to choose from...and that they...like myself... may want a do-it all type rifle...I don't want several different types...not just yet anyway...and right now ...I'm limited by what my gun dealer can or will order in for me...working off my trade-in...

I do appreciate everyones help so-far...and I'm like a big sponge taking it all in...or at least trying to...and I hope my questions haven't been a bother to ya all...


Thanks

Mac
 

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Dave,

I would just like to set the record straight about the weight of the TX 200 MK3. I know they are marked as weighting 4.2 kg. but my TX 200 MK3 weighted 8 lb. 13 oz. before mounting a scope on it. Yes it is heavier than my R-10 but not that much so. I see you prefer lighter weight rifles while I find that heavier rifles tend to be easier to shoot especially off handed. Don't react quite so badly to every heart beat. Lawdog
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I agree that a heavier rifle can be more accurate, but the thing I was getting at is that a light gun is usually preferrable in a hunting situation. I have heavy powerful accurate guns at hand, but its so much easier to grab the small light one that is easy to cock, quick to point (a squirrel isn't always going to wait for you to get the shot lined up) and easy on the recoil.

Target rifles are almost always heavy, 10+ lbs for the most part. My FWB 300s is right up there, as is the Walther LG55 (that one has a huge lead weight in the forearm). The TX200 is apparently used with some success at hunting, but its generally recognized as an excellent FT rifle. The R11 is also intended as an FT rifle, and from what I hear does ok but not as well as the TX, but that may well have as much to do with the shooter as with the gun. If you're intending to do FT, .177 is the preferred caliber.

Oh, and about the cost, wait until you see what a good FT scope will cost you. Most cost more than the gun they are mounted on.

LD...Is your gun beech or walnut, that may be the difference in the weights. Walnut guns are somewhat lighter. I think the Beech guns are listed at 9.4 lbs.

Now, about tunes- unfortunately, $500 guns aren't neccessarily much diferent than $150 guns when it comes to how they work and shoot. Cost cutting to increase the bottom line means a bit less in the quality department. Lots of the expensive guns vibrate and twang just as much, and lots of them need the same kind of work as cheaper guns when it comes to making them competitive. You'd be surprised how many TXs, R-11s, etc get tunes because owners aren't satisfied with them. Stock guns do ok, but a good tune will give you more of an edge since a tuned gun will shoot much better.
If you do decide on the R-11, check with Weihrauch directly after getting prices from US dealers. You can order direct from the factory, and it may be a bit cheaper that way. With the exchange rate going up the way it has, dealers here have had to raise prices considerably in the past few months. You may be able to order one direct and avoid the mark-up. The R-11 sells for about $520 here, direct from HW its priced at about 389 Euro, or $469 plus shipping.
 

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I recently acquired my first adult airgun. I too wanted something comparable to the powder burners that I am accustomed to. I called Straightshooters and asked them for a recommendation. I wanted a gun that was accurate enough to hit a sparrow at 40yds consistantly and with enough power to dispatch larger birds like crows and grackles with authority. I was told that a Beeman HW97 fit the bill. I ordered it with a Swift 4-12x40 scope. There's a learning curve to shooting a springer. I haven't gotten it down yet but when I do my part correctly, I stack pellets at 10yds. I'm a terrible offhand shot but was hitting a 1.5" square of metal I hung at 30ish yards 50-60% of the time. The 2" square 90%.

That said, it's off to the tuner later this week for de-burring, de-twanging, de-torquing, a maccari spring and a trigger job for the little bit of 2nd stage creep it has.

Ian
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like a nice set-up Haywire...and more importantly you doing pretty good with it so-far...I've got my R-11 ordered...and doing the scope&mount decision right now...I'm still debating on a fixed power 4 X...with a/o...or a 3x9...right now I don't see a need for any higher than that...unless I can run across a exceptional deal on a high quality one...I hate scrimping on a scope...but I've put a-lot into the rifle...and I have a bunch of other things going on that cost a-lot too...


Mac
 

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Dave,

LD...Is your gun beech or walnut, that may be the difference in the weights. Walnut guns are somewhat lighter. I think the Beech guns are listed at 9.4 lbs.
Beech! Airguns of Arizona was out of the walnut model when I ordered. They made me a good deal on the beech model by throwing in a set of BKL rings and two tins of Crow Magnum pellets(my choice). Like doing business with Airguns of Arizona. Bought my Theoben SLR-98 from them. Lawdog
:D
 
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