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I have an Oberndolf Swedish Mauser on the way; I want to build a light weight rifle in 250-3000. I want to stock it in a classic style, configured as a blind magazine style to save the weight of the bottom metal. I have stocked 4-5 Mauser's using hinged bottom metal but have never done a blind magazine stock and are un-sure on a couple of issues:

1) Does the magazine recess have to be lined with a cut down magazine box, fiberglass, etc or there any problem with just sanding the wood recess smooth?

2) How is the bottom of the spring attached to the bottom of the recess. I could cut down a old floor plate with the spring grooves and epoxy in place, but would add weight also.

Any suggestions appreciated.

Don
 

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It would be possibkle to simply inlet the action so that there is no ledge for the follower to hang on. The follower doesn't need to be attached to the bottom of the magazine cut. The magazine box adds to the recoil transfer for the mauser action but the 250 Savage is so mild I don't believe it would be necessary..
 

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A magazine well liner, which keeps rounds from wandering off the follower's path and catching the underside of the action/flat during rising/feeding, would also keep a stockmaker from having to make an undersize magazine well to perform the same function.

The mag spring's top end still hooks into the follower slots, but the bottom can simply rest on the floor of the magazine well.

The issue magazine box/bottom metal of a properly bedded Mauser should in no way/shape/form aid in the transfer of recoil from the barreled action to the stock - the ones that do invariably lead to split stocks, especially in the thin web between mag well and trigger inletting.

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Most of the mauser 98's and all the sporters I've seen had the magazine box bedded tight in its inlet. The transfer of recoil is in the 98 a group effort with the recoil lug and the magazine both assisting. The sides of the box take the brunt of the effort with the latch housing being pretty much free. This transfers the energy into the sidewalls for the most part. Splitting usually means the action was badly inletted or the recoil lug gave way. This allows the acton to move to the rear and the latch housing on the magazine box to contact the bridge in front of the trigger relief. Also the rear tang will act as a wedge and split the stock through the wrist. This is the reason many 98's have 2 stock bolts, the front thru the recoil lug ledge and the rear most to stiffen the bridge in front of the trigger relief. The technique allows much better recoil handling than the 98's tine recoil lug is capable of.. Many sporters even used a steel ledge behind the recoil lug, held by the stock re-enforcement bolt,it helped the recoil lug to stand recoil even more.. Careful investigation will almost always find pressure polishing of the stock areas just rearward of the box on 98's of many flavors.. The forged steel box is interlocked into the action mechanically and is very capable of handling the stress.
 

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[Careful investigation will almost always find pressure polishing of the stock areas just rearward of the box on 98's of many flavors]

No disrespect, but pressure-polished wood inside the rear magazine well/wall means that the recoil lug has already compressed the stockwood enough to allow the mag metal to bear - a "no-no".

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I certainly agree but I consistantly found no touching of the rear action srew in it's spacer tube. The only other contact point was the recoil lug. A couple of the rifles I looked at were heavy caliber sporters and many had 2 cross bolts in the stock. One, of course behind the recoil lug reenforcing the recoil lug abutment nut the other was thru the brisge between the trigger cut and the magazine box. Also in instances where the single lug was used there was little or no contact between the box and it's rearward abutment and as best I can remember these were usually (single stock bolt rifles) found with the flat steel stock lug inletted behind the recoil lug. This plate is the bearing surface and greatly resists any setback. Wish I had written notes over the years so calibers versus stock setup could be compared. I am certainly not a mauser werke sporter expert but in the vein of the m98 and the tremendous amount of engineering that went into this design I firmly believe this to have been done apurpose..
 
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