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I am contemplating a trip to Canada to hunt. I have posted this question on other boards to solicit opinions and suggestions. I was wondering about the hassles of crossing the border. In the past,, it seemed to be really no big deal. Now I have heard all kinds of horror stories.

Could anyone give any suggestions crossing the border? Thanks.
 

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As I understand it, most of the "Horror stories" are caused by people that were not prepared. Have all of your papers in order when you get to the window, be polite, and don't act nervous.
Regulations are in flux right now, I'd be checking regularily, and espescially as the time aproaches.
I had a bad time at the border going into the US at Detroit one time ( before 911), because one of the jerks I was with forgot his ID. Tore the car apart, dumped our luggage, put us in a cell for half an hour. Nice welcome.
 

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Something to keep in mind crossing the border. There are Two Customs Agency's to deal with; U.S. Customs and Canada Customs.

Before you leave the U.S., the Gun Control Act of 1968 and the International Trafficing in Arms Regulation require you to stop at U.S. Customs and declare your firearms.

Yeah I know, your thinking you never had do this before. But the truth is yes you did.

When you report into U.S. Customs tell the Customs Inspector you want to declare firearms and ask for a Custom registration. Do not bring your firearms into the Custom office unless specifically directed to by a Customs Officer [/color]If you already have a Customs registration form have it out in your hand ready to present. If the Customs Inpsector says oh you don't need that, politely insist. This Customs registration form is the primary document that you need to bring your firearm back into the U.S. This form is the proof that you had the firearm lawfully in the U.S. before you left.

While in Customs inquire about procedures for bringing game back, pay attention to the answer. No processed game. Field dressed and skinned is okay, birds need a feathered wing still on.

Now you are ready to go to Canada Customs. As has already been stated in a previous post, pull up to the window and declare your firerams. Be polite and follow their directions. If you look around on the Internet you should find the form you need to fill out in order to bring your guns into Canada. It won't hurt to have it filled out and ready to present when you drive up. Ask if you have to stop on the way out of Canada


Now when you return to the U.S. have your U.S. Customs Registration form out and ready to present. You may be allowed to pass or you may be inspected. If you have game make sure you declare it when you drive up. You will have to fill out a Fish and Wildlife form.

If you plan these three stops into your trip you will find the whole thing a lot less stressful.
 

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bigbore - There are lots of guys on this site on this site that know more about this than me but a friend of mine has a 100 or so guys come up
for goose hunting every fall and if your paperwork is in order it is not a big deal. You have to (at least he does) apply for a permit in advance of
showing up at the border and I think it is $60.00 to bring your own gun
and $30.00 if you are going to borrow one. I might be wrong on those numbers. If you look up Canadian Firearms on the website and again
I'm sure of the actual site name I think you will come up with the info you
need. The phone # is 1 800 731 4000 and be prepared to wait but at least
you will talk to somebody alive.
As long as you don't have a criminal record you shouldn't have any
problems. All the government wants is your money
 

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border crossing

Check out the gov't site at www.cfc.gc.ca. There is a specific section on visitors to canada. Bear in mind, that you are required to " temporarily" register your firearms while in canada. I wouldn't be surprised if they shared that info with your gov't as well. You can borrow guns from the outfitter if you wish. Most outfitters are accomidating and will probably get you a gun similar to what you own to use while in canada. I cross the border 5 nights a week, so feel free to ask any specific questions.
 

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One of the nightmare stories that I've heard about crossing into Canada lately is that if you've had a DWI anytime in your life, even 20-30 yrs ago and have never had any problems since that they will still deny entry. Any truth to this?

Buckshot Liam
 

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horror stories

While there is some truth to the fact that criminal records are coming under more scrutiny lately, the problems lie in the fact that the same criminal conviction may be different to both countries. Not claming to be a law professor, but a d.u.i. in canada is considered a felony, where in the u.s. it is not that big a deal. Most of the problems I've seen are caused by ignorant people who feel that they don't have to answer questions. ****, I've even seen people pull up to the booth sipping a beer!!! :shock: If your honest, you should have no problem. If you want clarification, e-mail canada customs at:www.ccra.gc.ca. They also have specific info about visiting canada.
 

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I'm a Correctional Officer in Windsor, ON. I can tell you for a fact that many of the horror stories you hear are true. Since 911 our Immigration hold count has tripled. If you are going to cross the border with firearms, make sure your paperwork is in order, BE POLITE, and don't have a criminal record of any kind. I booked a poor American sob in a last fall ago who frequently duck hunts just outside of Windsor. He had a couple of #4 12 guage shells in his trunk that he had forgotten about. He did over 20 days before Immigration deported him.
 
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