Graybeard Outdoors banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering how many of the lever action guys here use a bore guide, and specially coated cleaning rods.

I've been away from guns and hunting for a few years, and am just now getting back in. Just bought myself a H&R Handi 30-30, and a Marlin 336W.

One thing that's changed since I was a young hunter is the obsession with cleaning equipment. Back in the 70's, we used an aluminum cleaning rod, a brass brush, Hoppes #9, and patches. Cleaning a gun took 5 minutes. Nowadays, people take it as serious as if they had a million dollar gun to care for. Bore guides and specially coated (expensive) cleaning rods are the norm. Expensive barrel break-in procedures. The works.

Anybody here think this is overkill, especially for a short-medium-range gun like a lever 30-30?

Just wondering if all this modern, expensive cleaning equipment is a solution to a non-existent problem.

Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
For guns cleaned from the muzzle I like bore guides. They save the muzzle which can affect the accuracy if worn. I also like stainless steel uncoated rods because they tend not to pick up abrasive particles like aluminum or some of the coated rods. Guides and good rods don't cost much, and if they let me enjoy my guns longer then they are a good investment in my opinion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,821 Posts
Since I only lightly clean my barrels once a year, I don't worry about it too much. The Marlin and the Handi can be cleaned from the breech end of the barrel. I believe excessive/obsessive cleaning is the worst thing you can do to a modern rifle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
I generally will clean my lever 30-30s each time I go to the range. But I'll usually shoot at least a 100 or more cast bullets. And while I rarely see any leading, the barrels do get filthy from the powder and lube. Plus we live right on the salt water and I'd have to oil them up anyway if I don't want a rusty barrel next week. Consequently it's just as easy to clean and oil them at the same time. I can't say that my cleaning rods are anything exotic though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
419 Posts
Anyone with a metallurgy background knows that aluminum and brass (rods) are TOO SOFT to scratch or damage your steel bore. Coated rods are a waste of money and a gimmick to get deeper in your pocket book.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,821 Posts
Aluminum Oxide on the rods and even wooden rods can ruin those crisp rifling at the bore. Unless you clean from the breech any rod will ruin your accuracy. That's why I don't clean much.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,526 Posts
bigmac - you said "One thing that's changed since I was a young hunter is the obsession with cleaning equipment. Back in the 70's, we used an aluminum cleaning rod, a brass brush, Hoppes #9, and patches. Cleaning a gun took 5 minutes". Yep, still does and that's the way I've been cleaning my rifles since the 60s.

One difference for me is when using a sectional cleaning rod I will wrap the 'jig to rod' connection with electricians tape to make certain the edges are covered and will also wrap the tape around the rod in a couple of places (at the connections) to try and keep the jig centered in the bore. Just a little added protection for the muzzle but at least it is there (and it lasts through a bunch of uses) but otherwise it is still the Hoppes #9, brass brush and patches. Mikey.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
six_gunz said:
Anyone with a metallurgy background knows that aluminum and brass (rods) are TOO SOFT to scratch or damage your steel bore. Coated rods are a waste of money and a gimmick to get deeper in your pocket book.
Aluminum and brass are to soft to scratch steel, but they are soft enough to pick up grit and get it embedded into the rod turning it into something like an abrasive lap that will ruin your bore. Most coated rods can do this as well. My preference is for stainless steel, and I clean them prior to running them down the bore. I also use bore guides. I think my guns are worth it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
419 Posts
Keith said:
six_gunz said:
Anyone with a metallurgy background knows that aluminum and brass (rods) are TOO SOFT to scratch or damage your steel bore. Coated rods are a waste of money and a gimmick to get deeper in your pocket book.
Aluminum and brass are to soft to scratch steel, but they are soft enough to pick up grit and get it embedded into the rod turning it into something like an abrasive lap that will ruin your bore. Most coated rods can do this as well. My preference is for stainless steel, and I clean them prior to running them down the bore. I also use bore guides. I think my guns are worth it.






Like what? Lead or copper? They too are too soft to scratch steel
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,869 Posts
Like sand, dirt, metal filings that may be on the bench etc.

Do what you want to. You will anyway. I want my guns to last. I clean mine when I need to and haven't ruined one yet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
I'd just as soon spend money on ammo, as to spend it on new cleaning equipment every couple of years? I like to shoot my guns! Can anyone say they cleaned guns with the old fashion aluminum cleaning rods and lost accuracy within a few thousand rounds?
I think this train of thought started during military training when steel cleaning rods were used?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
54 Posts
As a child cleaning a gun was an excuse to play with the guns. (No ammo involved) So I cleaned my father's single shot 12 gauge alot. In the military, I cleaned my issued weapons every chance I got, Because they were always being inspected and that was part of the game. Now, I wipe my guns down with oil, (Silicone Oil) every chance I get and after they have been handled or shot. I also run a patch or a bore snake through the barrel after I shoot them and apply a little oil. Every now and then I use the Hoppes. I do wipe down the moving parts but I only disassemble the gun if needed. (after being in the Rain) I have been doing this on some of my guns over twenty years And I have never noticed any problems at the range and no rust. I don't let the gun sit more than a couple of hours after I shoot. Cleaning a gun probably takes me about 5 minutes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,557 Posts
Ditto the bore snakes, I like them also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
Bore guide with a carbon fiber rod in the shop, pulling the bolt out the 336. Boresnake when I am in the field.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top